AMD - Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
52.74
-0.45 (-0.85%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close53.19
Open53.27
Bid0.00 x 1200
Ask0.00 x 1100
Day's Range49.09 - 53.28
52 Week Range27.29 - 59.27
Volume101,990,806
Avg. Volume80,468,696
Market Cap61.769B
Beta (5Y Monthly)2.17
PE Ratio (TTM)123.80
EPS (TTM)0.43
Earnings DateJul. 28, 2020 - Aug. 03, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateApr. 27, 1995
1y Target Est53.37
  • AMD Offers Early Entry
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    AMD Offers Early Entry

    AMD moved above downward-sloping trend line in handle, moved to/above short-term resistance in handle. Still below actual handle – also NVDA earnings loom.Leaderboard stock

  • AMD Still Setting Up
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    AMD Still Setting Up

    AMD is working toward a 58.93 cup-with-handle buy point. AMD lagged some data-center chip peers in recent weeks after earnings, but is trying to catch up.

  • Nasdaq Today: What's Sending Chip Stocks AMD and NVIDIA Lower Wednesday?
    Motley Fool

    Nasdaq Today: What's Sending Chip Stocks AMD and NVIDIA Lower Wednesday?

    The Nasdaq Composite (NASDAQINDEX: ^IXIC) has held up better during the coronavirus bear market than many of its broader benchmark peers, as investors have generally been optimistic about the prospects for the high-growth tech stocks that make up the bulk of the biggest companies that trade on the Nasdaq. Among the outstanding performers in the Nasdaq so far in 2020 have been NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) and Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD). NVIDIA came into Wednesday up nearly 50% year to date, and AMD had been higher by 16%.

  • This Huge Opportunity Can Supercharge AMD’s Growth
    Motley Fool

    This Huge Opportunity Can Supercharge AMD’s Growth

    Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) is showing no signs of slowing down despite the adverse impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on businesses and economies around the globe. According to Mercury Research, AMD held 4.5% of the server processor market at the end of 2019. There are rumors that the chipmaker is aiming to attain 10% market share in server CPUs (central processing units) by the end of 2020 -- and seems to be making solid progress toward its goal.

  • Where Will Advanced Micro Devices Be in 1 Year?
    Motley Fool

    Where Will Advanced Micro Devices Be in 1 Year?

    One of the biggest winners in the semiconductor space over the past few years has been Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD). The CPU and GPU designer had long been an also-ran in the chip space, with minimal market share relative to CPU leader Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) and GPU leader NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA). Look no further than AMD's stock price relative to the market for the last five years as evidence of its renaissance under CEO Lisa Su, who took over in 2014.

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    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Adobe, Advanced Micro Devices, Wynn Resorts and Everest Re Group

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    Top Research Reports for Intel, Adobe & AMD

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  • Intel's (INTC) New Chips to Boost Efficiency Amid Remote Work
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  • Intel CEO: Expectations for the second quarter are relatively strong
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    Intel CEO: Expectations for the second quarter are relatively strong

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  • Is Advanced Micro Devices a Safe Coronavirus Stock?
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    Is Advanced Micro Devices a Safe Coronavirus Stock?

    The company that powers the new PlayStation and Xbox expects revenue to grow approximately 25% in 2020.

  • Baystreet

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  • Bloomberg

    TSMC Plans $12 Billion U.S. Chip Plant in Victory for Trump

    (Bloomberg) -- Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. plans to spend $12 billion building a chip plant in Arizona, a decision designed to allay U.S. national security concerns and shift more high-tech manufacturing to America.TSMC said Friday it will start construction of its next major fabrication facility in 2021, to be completed by 2024. While the investment falls short of its previous expenditure on cutting-edge factories, it’s a shift for a company that now makes semiconductors for major names like Apple Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co. mainly from its home base of Taiwan.As the world’s largest and most advanced maker of chips for other companies, TSMC plays a crucial role in the production of devices from smartphones and laptops to servers running the internet. Its decision to situate a plant in the western state comes after White House officials had warned repeatedly about the threat inherent in having much of the world’s electronics made outside of the U.S. TSMC had negotiated the deal with the administration to create American jobs and produce sensitive components domestically for national security reasons, according to people familiar with the situation.The Asian chipmaker’s U.S. investment underscores the delicate balance it needs to strike between its huge roster of American clients and China, which views independently governed Taiwan as part of its territory. Beijing’s ambition of creating a world-class domestic semiconductor industry has unnerved Washington, which fears the country’s technological ascendancy may pose a longer-threat. Executives at TSMC, which operates plants in Nanjing and Shanghai and makes chips that go into everything from 5G networks to American fighter jets, have emphasized the company is neutral.“The scale & technology is similar to what TSMC did in China, suggesting a balance between the U.S. & China,” Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. analysts led by Mark Li wrote after the announcement. “Overall, this is probably the minimal price to stay neutral. TSMC needs both U.S. & China to maintain scale & stay competitive and this is probably the minimal cost to keep this strategy.”Read more: Huawei Warns of ‘Pandora’s Box’ If U.S. Curbs Taiwan SupplyThe envisioned facility represents a small step in global industry terms. Upon completion, it will crank out 20,000 wafers a month, versus the hundreds of thousands that TSMC’s capable of from its main home base. And it will employ 5-nanometer process technology, a current standard that will likely become a few generations old by the time output begins in a few years.The higher cost of operating in America may have been a factor ahead of the decision. A true cutting-edge fab is expensive to build: The company spent NT$500 billion ($17 billion) to build an advanced facility in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan that will supply new iPhones this year. It plans another $16 billion in capital spending in 2020. The Arizona plant still requires approval from TSMC’s board, which may hinge on incentives.“There is a cost gap, which is hard to accept at this point. Of course, we have -- we are doing a lot of things to reduce that cost gap,” TSMC Chairman Mark Liu said on a recent analyst conference call.U.S. Won’t Tolerate Tech Fence-Sitters Any Longer: Tim CulpanIf the federal government provides cash for a U.S. plant, it’ll mark a shift in policy and rhetoric from a Republican administration. Trump’s White House has rarely supported such direct industrial intervention, favoring market dynamics. A similar government-backed effort with Foxconn -- Apple’s main iPhone assembler -- in Wisconsin has so far not created as many jobs as expected.However, emerging trends may be forcing a reconsideration. The U.S. government is already giving or lending billions of dollars to keep companies afloat in the midst of a pandemic-fueled recession. The crisis has also highlighted how vulnerable global supply chains are to such shocks.The White House may also be motivated by broader political factors. Trump has attacked international trade deals and tried to limit China’s access to semiconductor technology, seeking to contain the country’s technological ascent. TSMC said its Arizona facility will create 1,600 jobs and a deal to bring highly skilled work to Arizona may help Trump’s re-election prospects this year.“TSMC’s plan to build a $12 billion semiconductor facility in Arizona is yet another indication that President Trump’s policy agenda has led to a renaissance in American manufacturing and made the United States the most attractive place in the world to invest,” U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in a statement.By producing chips for many of the leading tech companies, TSMC has amassed the technical know-how needed to churn out the smallest, most efficient and powerful semiconductors in the highest volumes. It manufactures important components designed by Apple and most of the largest semiconductor companies, including Qualcomm Inc., Nvidia Corp., Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and China’s Huawei. Shares of Applied Materials Inc., Lam Research Corp. and KLA Corp. rose on optimism that these U.S.-based providers of chipmaking equipment may face fewer export controls when supplying TSMC.Concentrating such valuable capabilities in the hands of one company in Asia is a concern for the U.S., especially when, across the Strait of Taiwan, China is rushing to develop its own semiconductor industry.TSMC’s local rival, GlobalFoundries Inc., has given up on advanced manufacturing and Intel Corp., the world’s largest chipmaker, mainly manufactures for itself. Its attempt to become a so-called foundry for external clients has failed to gain major customers. TSMC’s only other significant challenger is South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co., which is investing more than $116 billion in its effort to keep up with the leader.“TSMC welcomes continued strong partnership with the U.S. administration and the State of Arizona on this project,” the company said in a statement. “This project will require significant capital and technology investments from TSMC. The strong investment climate in the United States, and its talented workforce make this and future investments in the U.S. attractive to TSMC.”Read more: Foxconn Factory Subsidy Estimate Slashed by Wisconsin Agency(Updates with analyst’s comment from the fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • AMD's New Radeon Pro VII GPUs Enhance Workstation Experience
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    AMD's New Radeon Pro VII GPUs Enhance Workstation Experience

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  • Covid-19 Pandemic Weighs on the Earnings Picture
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    Covid-19 Pandemic Weighs on the Earnings Picture

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  • American States Should Chase This Taiwan Company Instead
    Bloomberg

    American States Should Chase This Taiwan Company Instead

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Less than three years after Wisconsin won a beauty contest to lure Taiwanese manufacturer Foxconn Technology Group to the state, local leaders and voters have been left with buyers remorse. Founder Terry Gou’s stated plans to build a $10 billion plant making flat screens were illogical from the start, and taxpayers there now realize it.There’s another Taiwanese company that might be looking for a new American foothold. And this time, such a project makes complete sense.Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. is the world’s most important chip company. It makes high-end components using the best technology for clients including Apple Inc., Qualcomm Inc., Nvidia Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. Yet it produces the bulk of its chips at three locations in Taiwan with additional capacity in China. TSMC has barely any footprint in America, owning one old factory in Washington state which it bought 20 years ago.U.S. national security concerns, protectionis, and a growing need to diversify have led me to conclude that a new American facility for TSMC is inevitable. A plan is now under discussion, but not yet confirmed, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal this week.The only question — beyond when, and how much — is where TSMC will put it.State governors need to pay attention. They’ve been burnt before, or at least Wisconsin’s Scott Walker has. His decision to push ahead with the Foxconn facility in 2017, at the cost of up to $3 billion in taxpayer-funded subsidies, is a major reason that the Republican governor lost reelection the following year.When then-presidential candidate Donald Trump started talking up a renaissance in U.S. manufacturing in 2016, Foxconn’s Gou put his team to work. The company is famous for assembling iPhones using hundreds of thousands of factory workers, mostly in China. As he built his empire, Gou accumulated decades of experience pitting local and national governments against each other with the promise of jobs and economic prosperity. Quite often, the plans never came to fruition, no matter how willing the locals were to make him a sweetheart deal. Within months of Trump’s victory, Gou had governors of rust-belt states — including Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Illinois and Indiana —  eager to land what was described as a once-in-a-generation opportunity. In the end, Wisconsin’s package convinced Foxconn to break ground in Racine County as preparation for a massive flat-panel display factory that would provide 13,000 manufacturing jobs.I wrote back then, many times, that these plans didn’t add up. Flat screens aren’t native to American industry and the country lacks the trained personnel to staff such a facility. There’s already a global oversupply and little chance of strong growth. The product is too fragile to ship long distances. Foxconn has since scaled back its plans and failed to hit some employment targets required to receive incentives. But just 60 miles away from Foxconn’s Taipei headquarters sits TSMC, a company that would be a much better fit for the U.S. With tensions rising between Beijing and Washington, and the Covid-19 pandemic highlighting the risks to America having much of its technology supply chain overseas, TSMC is facing increasing pressure to boost its U.S. presence.At first thought, California might seem the obvious place to host a new factory. After all, that’s where TSMC’s largest clients are based. Ironically, given that it’s home to Silicon Valley — a name derived from the metal used to make integrated circuits — the state has relatively few chip manufacturing facilities. The big names of three decades ago have either merged, or gone fabless — meaning they design without making their own chips.In fact, America’s semiconductor production sector is spread across at least a dozen states around the country, according to my analysis of company data and press reports. (1)That could make a new TSMC facility in the U.S. up for grabs. And if making high-end display panels was a bad fit for Wisconsin, a chip factory fits well in the current and future structure of American industry. To this day, the U.S. remains the global leader in semiconductor design, development and manufacturing, with its universities churning out the best electrical and electronics engineers. TSMC founder Morris Chang is an alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford, while the current chairman, Mark Liu, got his Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley. Exactly how many jobs a U.S. fab might create is hard to predict. Earlier this year, Liu told investors that any factory there would deploy the company’s most advanced technologies, which work best at scale.As a comparison, TSMC employs over 10,000 people at its Tainan facilities, which utilize leading-edge manufacturing processes for Apple’s iPhone chips, and expects to add another few thousand in coming years. Given that semiconductor manufacturing engineer salaries in America can top $100,000, luring even half that number of jobs would be a boon for any state.The eagerness with which communities chased Amazon.com Inc. for the e-commerce company’s second headquarters shows that many local leaders are as eager to chase high-paid employment as they are factory jobs.With the prospect of the world’s eighth-largest tech company by market value looking for a new place to set up shop, U.S. governors are likely to find themselves back in the chase.(1) Data was collated from company statements, annual reports, and press reports for the past 5 years.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Why Shares of Advanced Micro Devices Rose 15.2% in April
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Advanced Micro Devices Rose 15.2% in April

    Shares of Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) rose 15.2% in April, according to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence. The company also reported earnings late in the month, which met analyst expectations. Much of the April boost for AMD shares came from data points from other large technology companies.

  • AMD Is Quietly Taking Aim at a Big Growth Opportunity
    Motley Fool

    AMD Is Quietly Taking Aim at a Big Growth Opportunity

    The novel coronavirus pandemic has given the cloud gaming market a shot in the arm. Online gaming services like NVIDIA's (NASDAQ: NVDA) GeForce Now and Microsoft's (NASDAQ: MSFT) Project xCloud have seen a surge in traffic as shelter-in-place orders and lockdowns across the globe have kept people confined to their homes. This could be a big deal for Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD), as the tech giant has been gradually expanding its reach in the cloud gaming space.