NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
429.32
-6.93 (-1.59%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close436.25
Open437.00
Bid428.20 x 800
Ask428.45 x 800
Day's Range427.18 - 439.09
52 Week Range252.28 - 458.97
Volume5,422,334
Avg. Volume9,055,944
Market Cap188.817B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.97
PE Ratio (TTM)86.89
EPS (TTM)4.94
Earnings DateJul. 15, 2020 - Jul. 20, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est449.21
  • HBO Max’s Biggest Competitor: HBO
    Bloomberg

    HBO Max’s Biggest Competitor: HBO

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- HBO Max launches in just two days, and it has the potential to be one of the best streaming-TV apps out there. The only problem is, consumers don’t seem to have a clue what’s on it. In a poll earlier this month conducted by Morning Consult and the Hollywood Reporter, some 2,000 U.S. adults were asked to choose from a list of TV shows and movie titles which ones they think will be available on HBO Max, a new Netflix-like service being introduced by AT&T Inc.’s WarnerMedia division. The results should worry company executives:As the chart shows, hardly any of the respondents knew that HBO Max would be the exclusive streaming destination for the hit sitcoms “Friends” and “The Big Bang Theory” — highly sought-after content rights that WarnerMedia reportedly spent more than $900 million to secure for the new service. It also wasn’t apparent to the survey takers that DC Comics films and “Sesame Street” would reside on HBO Max.HBO has stood as a force all its own for so long that most people just don’t realize it shares a parent company with Warner Bros. studios and other TV networks, such as Cartoon Network, TBS and Turner Classic Movies. That’s too bad since the same poll showed that the inclusion of such content would make many consumers more likely to subscribe. The most telling response, though: Most of the people polled didn’t even think that “Game of Thrones” — the premier series of HBO’s entire 47-year history — would be accessible through HBO Max, even though it has “HBO” in the name. Consumers can be forgiven for the confusion. Americans’ experience so far with streaming-TV apps is that nothing is intuitive and everything is hard to find. For example, it’s not like ESPN+ is a digital replica of regular ESPN; it’s a different product entirely. And for years “Friends” has been available on Netflix, so young people may only know it as a Netflix show. Without being aware of HBO’s ownership and WarnerMedia’s recent dealmaking, there’s no obvious reason Central Perk would be on the same block as Sesame Street, around the corner from Westeros on the streaming continent of HBO Max. To make matters more confusing, streaming regular HBO (through the HBO Now app) and signing up for HBO Max costs exactly the same — $15 a month.Disney+, which has signed up more than 50 million users since its November launch, doesn’t share HBO Max’s branding conundrum. The only thing survey takers seemed to know for sure is that “The Mandalorian” isn’t part of HBO Max. And that’s probably because Walt Disney Co. has so successfully reestablished “Star Wars” as a Disney property, even though it has only owned the franchise since 2012. The same goes for Pixar and Marvel. It’s for that reason that the biggest hangup of Disney+ — being so narrowly focused on superheroes and kid-friendly programming — can also be a strength. The biggest challenge for other streaming services may be building loyalty when viewers aren’t quite sure what to expect. The move away from appointment viewing on cable TV means that while we’re loyal to particular series and trilogies, we don’t necessarily know (or care) what networks or studios they’re tied to. For WarnerMedia, there’s still certainly a powerful advantage in continuing to use the HBO name for its new product — right away it tells people to expect great content (and hopefully that quality isn’t sacrificed while trying to keep up with the Netflix production factory). At the same time, it makes it difficult and costly to educate consumers on what HBO Max even is. That’s especially true when some of its content is temporarily licensed from its very competitors, such as Disney’s “The Mighty Ducks” and “X-Men: Dark Phoenix,” thanks to distribution deals that predate the streaming wars. (Remember, “X-Men” is Marvel, not the DC Extended Universe.)HBO Max could give other apps a run for their money. But how do you easily explain that it’s just like regular HBO, but it has all this other stuff you’ll probably like as well, yet it doesn’t cost anything extra? Good luck fitting that into a compelling advertisement.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    TikTok's In-App Revenue Skyrockets During Lockdowns

    (Bloomberg) -- ByteDance Ltd.’s millennial sensation TikTok and its Chinese twin app Douyin ranked top in the world among mobile apps for April revenue, according to Sensor Tower data that excludes games and advertising.Focusing narrowly on in-app purchases, TikTok and Douyin’s numbers for the month showed a tenfold increase to $78 million, propelling them ahead of more established names like YouTube, Tinder and Netflix, which rely more on existing subscriptions.The Chinese market, served by Douyin, contributed 86.6% of the app income, followed by the U.S. with 8.2%. In either version of the video-streaming app filled with dance videos and memes, users can purchase virtual currency to spend on supporting their favorite creators.Like many social media platforms, ByteDance is testing the waters of online commerce, even while it continues to rely on advertising as its main source of income. Emarketer expects that more than 75 million US social-network users aged 14 and older will make at least one purchase from a social channel in 2020, up 17.3% from 2019.In 2020’s first quarter, TikTok and Douyin generated 315 million downloads globally, up from 187 million a year earlier, said Sensor Tower, noting the positive influence of Covid-19 on the video-sharing apps’ popularity.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 2 Stocks You Can Buy and Hold Forever
    Motley Fool

    2 Stocks You Can Buy and Hold Forever

    Netflix and Microsoft have demonstrated the ability to meet challenges while delivering explosive returns for investors.

  • The Dow Is Getting Crushed in the Recovery Trade
    Bloomberg

    The Dow Is Getting Crushed in the Recovery Trade

    (Bloomberg) -- This week marks a milestone for the Dow Jones Industrial Average: its 124th birthday. Not that anyone watching markets needs a reminder it’s getting old.Wrinkles show in the gaping divide between the venerable gauge and its younger brethren. Like many grandparents, it’s struggling to keep up with tech. Plunges in Boeing Co. -- its biggest member at the start of February -- were very costly, and some wonder if the benchmark represents the 21st century economy at all, especially in the coronavirus age.“The Dow has been on its way out for years,” said John Ham, associate adviser at New England Investment and Retirement Group. “Obviously it’s going to stick around just because so many people are familiar with it. But as far as relevancy goes, it’s your grandfather’s index.”Rarely have differences among indexes been more stark than they are now, in a market where the outbreak has made heroes of New Economy firms. Deprived of their benefits, the Dow remains down 14% in 2020 and was off 35% at its worst point. Meanwhile, the Nasdaq 100 has gained more than 7% this year, and the S&P 500 is 9% away from a positive return.Of course, the Dow has been consigned to history before, and survived. While it might be showing its age now, brief divergences among broad indexes are extremely common, and over long enough intervals they tend to even out.“Yes it is old,” said Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices. “If you constructed something today, you would probably do it differently. But it’s worked for 124 years. Even currently. And it is a much smaller portfolio yet it does track over time to the broader S&P 500.”Judging an index by whether it rises more than another misconstrues the purpose of stock benchmarks, which is to measure the progress of a market. The S&P 500’s edge over the Dow in 2020 doesn’t make it a better or more useful tool. It does, however, shine a light on what in the economy is calling the shots during the lockdown -- online and automated companies like Amazon.com Inc. and Netflix Inc.Divergences among the gauges also matter to the masses of investors who invest in funds that track them. Roughly $11.2 trillion is indexed or benchmarked to the S&P 500, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices, and $4.6 trillion in passively managed assets are tied to it. About $31.5 billion is benchmarked to the Dow, with $28.2 billion of passively managed funds linked.Thanks to tech’s dominance, those divisions are getting especially pronounced. Less than halfway through the year, the Nasdaq has already outperformed the Dow by a full percentage point on 17 different days. That’s more than in any full year since 2009, data compiled by Bloomberg show.A lot of the discrepancy boils down to which companies don’t make the Dow’s cut. Take Amazon.com, for example, whose 35% gain this year has accounted for almost half of the Nasdaq’s advance and 10% of the S&P 500’s. Because of the stock’s $2,500 price tag, the Dow’s old-fashioned price-weighting system makes it impossible to let Amazon in.Other high-fliers that have proved themselves in a stay-at-home world also don’t appear in the Dow. Nvidia Corp., Netflix Inc. and PayPal Holdings Inc. -- all winners in the coronavirus age -- are each up at least 30% this year. The venerable Dow has gotten none of that boost.“If all you’re following is the Dow, you’re missing some big components,” said Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial. “I hate to say it’s old, but there’s no question that it’s behind the times if you look at the way it’s broken down.”The Dow Jones Industrial Average, created on May 26, 1896, is different from other indexes. It’s weighted by share price rather than market cap, which is more commonly used today. Such methodology essentially rules out inclusion of several of the largest companies in the world, among them Google parent Alphabet Inc., whose shares trade above $1,000 and would likely take up too much of the index.A committee chooses members, not an objective, rules-based process. According to Dow Jones Averages methodology papers found on its website, the Dow seeks to maintain “adequate sector representation” and favors a company that “has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors.”As a result, a company like jet-maker Boeing Co., down 60% this year, is more influential on the Dow’s performance than even the fourth largest American company, Alphabet, is on the S&P 500’s returns. Industrial firms, as the name of the index suggests, make up a notable 13% of the Dow -- 5 percentage points more than the sector’s weight in the S&P 500 and 11 percentage points more than the Nasdaq.Such focus has hurt in a pandemic-arranged stock market, where closed factories and shuttered economies have left industrials as one of the worst performing groups. The emphasis on the old-age economy is all the more striking in a world where companies that can operate with little face-to-face contact excel and a technological shift is accelerated.“That’s the unique nature of this particular recession, and it’s coming from the virus,” said Luke Tilley, chief economist at Wilmington Trust Corp. “If you take those contours of both big companies tend to have a buffer because of their access to capital markets and then you compound what is expected to be a dramatic change to the economy, you can get that bifurcated performance.”That leaves another way to view the index gap: the Dow is perhaps the stock gauge that is most representative of the broad economy precisely because it’s not dominated by these megacap firms. Surging shares of Amazon or Netflix certainly don’t reflect an America with over 20 million people unemployed and a collapse in spending.While the S&P 500 and Nasdaq may be methodologically optimized for a stay-at-home world, the Dow is certainly not.“Covid is actually amplifying all types of inequalities in the economy but the inequality in the market in terms of market concentration is also being amplified,” said Nela Richardson, an investment strategist at Edward Jones. “That rally is highly concentrated in a handful of firms. Most firms are still in bear territory.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why ending coronavirus lockdowns 'won't be enough' to get people back to the movies
    Yahoo Finance

    Why ending coronavirus lockdowns 'won't be enough' to get people back to the movies

    As coronavirus restrictions lift, one expert says 'simply opening the doors will not be enough.'

  • Imagine Buying Netflix Stock 18 Years Ago
    Motley Fool

    Imagine Buying Netflix Stock 18 Years Ago

    You probably didn't get a party invitation, but Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) is blowing out 18 candles on its IPO birthday cake on Saturday. Netflix executed a 2-for-1 stock split two years after going public, followed by a 7-for-1 split in 2015. Put another way, investing $1,000 in Netflix when the stock was born would be worth $400,698.67 today as an 18-year-old adult.

  • Is Netflix Stock on the Verge of Collapse?
    Motley Fool

    Is Netflix Stock on the Verge of Collapse?

    Not everyone is a fan of Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX). Morningstar analyst Neil Macker is particularly bearish on the streaming video leader's prospects. Finance, Macker listed a number of risks he sees for Netflix's investors.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Netflix (NFLX) closed the most recent trading day at $429.32, moving -1.59% from the previous trading session.

  • Stock Market Wrap-Up: Why the Latest Netflix Panic Is Ridiculous
    Motley Fool

    Stock Market Wrap-Up: Why the Latest Netflix Panic Is Ridiculous

    Throughout the current crisis, investors have focused on video streaming giant Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX). Recently, Netflix followers have been concerned about the stock's pullback during what was otherwise a good week for the market, with Friday's drop marking the fifth day in a row that Netflix shares lost ground. One analyst sees the recent pullback as just the beginning of a huge move downward, but others remain optimistic that Netflix is on the cutting edge of the trend away from traditional home television viewing and toward on-demand streaming.

  • Why this analyst sees Netflix stock crashing more than 60%
    Yahoo Finance

    Why this analyst sees Netflix stock crashing more than 60%

    Netflix shares are overvalued at current levels, one Wall Street analyst argues.

  • Daily Crunch: Facebook embraces remote work
    TechCrunch

    Daily Crunch: Facebook embraces remote work

    Facebook takes more steps to support and expand a remote workforce, IBM announces layoffs and TechCrunch's big annual conference is going virtual. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg estimated that over the course of the next decade, half of the company could be working fully remotely. As the next step toward that goal, Facebook will be setting up new company hubs in Denver, Dallas and Atlanta.

  • Apple (AAPL) to Beef Up TV+ Content Library With Popular Shows
    Zacks

    Apple (AAPL) to Beef Up TV+ Content Library With Popular Shows

    Apple (AAPL) looks to build backlog content library in Tv+ streaming services to boost subscriber growth amid intensifying competition.

  • Why Is Netflix Getting Rid of Its Most Profitable Customers?
    Motley Fool

    Why Is Netflix Getting Rid of Its Most Profitable Customers?

    The leading premium service is watching the people who aren't watching -- and it's doing something surprising about it.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, Apple and Microsoft
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, Apple and Microsoft

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, Apple and Microsoft

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Apple, Facebook, Netflix and Amazon.com
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Apple, Facebook, Netflix and Amazon.com

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Apple, Facebook, Netflix and Amazon.com

  • Turn a $69,500 TFSA Into $2,000,000 by Doing This
    The Motley Fool

    Turn a $69,500 TFSA Into $2,000,000 by Doing This

    Investing in growth stocks such as Kinaxis (TSX:KXS) can increase your TFSA portfolio value exponentially. The post Turn a $69,500 TFSA Into $2,000,000 by Doing This appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Top economist says it will take economy years to recover from COVID-19
    Yahoo Finance

    Top economist says it will take economy years to recover from COVID-19

    The economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic will be slow, one top economist tells Yahoo Finance.

  • Netflix Is Helping Inactive Users Cancel Their Accounts
    Motley Fool

    Netflix Is Helping Inactive Users Cancel Their Accounts

    The media-streaming veteran expects to close "a few hundred thousand" inactive customer accounts.

  • Netflix to start cancelling inactive customers' subscriptions
    TechCrunch

    Netflix to start cancelling inactive customers' subscriptions

    Netflix said Thursday it will ask customers who have not watched anything on the on-demand video streaming service in a year or more if they wish to maintain their subscription -- and will cancel their membership if it does not hear back. The unusual move illustrates just how much confidence Netflix has on its loyal customer base. Netflix said these inactive accounts -- more popularly known as zombie accounts in the industry -- only represent a few hundred thousand users, or less than half of 1% of its overall member base -- a fact that the company already factors into its financial guidance.

  • Why Is Netflix (NFLX) Up 6.2% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Netflix (NFLX) Up 6.2% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Netflix (NFLX) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Has Netflix (NFLX) Outpaced Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?
    Zacks

    Has Netflix (NFLX) Outpaced Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?

    Is (NFLX) Outperforming Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?

  • 70% would rather watch new movies at home than at the theater: Study
    Yahoo Finance Video

    70% would rather watch new movies at home than at the theater: Study

    Yahoo Finance's Alexandra Canal breaks down how coronavirus second wave fears could impact live events.

  • Netflix cancelling subscriptions 'is more a positive PR move than anything else': Analyst
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Netflix cancelling subscriptions 'is more a positive PR move than anything else': Analyst

    Neil Macker, Morningstar Analyst, joins Yahoo Finance's Alexis Christoforous and Brian Sozzi to discuss Netflix's latest announcement that it plans to cancel inactive membership. Macker also weighs in on the overall streaming industry, including how a lack of production in 2020 could leave an impact in years to come.

  • Fed's Powell: U.S. economy faces ‘great uncertainty’
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Fed's Powell: U.S. economy faces ‘great uncertainty’

    Invesco Chief Global Market Strategist Kristina Hooper joins Yahoo Finance’s Brian Cheung and Seana Smith to discuss Jerome Powell's remarks as the Fed chair notes the U.S. economy faces ‘great uncertainty.’