Advertisement
Canada markets closed
  • S&P/TSX

    21,961.55
    +74.21 (+0.34%)
     
  • S&P 500

    5,421.03
    +45.71 (+0.85%)
     
  • DOW

    38,712.21
    -35.21 (-0.09%)
     
  • CAD/USD

    0.7285
    -0.0004 (-0.06%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    78.32
    -0.18 (-0.23%)
     
  • Bitcoin CAD

    93,790.46
    +1,537.45 (+1.67%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,449.67
    +54.63 (+3.92%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    2,336.20
    -18.60 (-0.79%)
     
  • RUSSELL 2000

    2,057.10
    +32.75 (+1.62%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    4.2950
    -0.1090 (-2.48%)
     
  • NASDAQ futures

    19,617.00
    +120.50 (+0.62%)
     
  • VOLATILITY

    12.04
    -0.81 (-6.30%)
     
  • FTSE

    8,215.48
    +67.67 (+0.83%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    38,987.10
    +110.39 (+0.28%)
     
  • CAD/EUR

    0.6733
    -0.0006 (-0.09%)
     

Business Lookahead: scaling the peaks

STORY: From a big hint about what the Fed does next, to a key moment for Sterling, these are the top stories in business and finance to watch out for in the coming days.

Critical U.S. inflation data out Friday may determine what the Fed does next.

Any sign that price rises are cooling off will add to bets that rates have peaked.

Also looming is the June 1 deadline for lifting the debt ceiling, with recent days offering hope that a deal will be done.

China’s central will set its loan prime rate on Monday.

With a recovery sputtering, there are growing expectations of more stimulus measures from Beijing.

ADVERTISEMENT

Tuesday’s closely watched U.S. purchasing managers’ index will measure business conditions.

A strong number might actually disappoint equity investors in Europe.

Shares there have benefited as signs of U.S. economic weakness drove some buyers to seek assets in other regions.

Sterling has been the top performing major currency against the dollar this year.

That could change if Wednesday’s UK inflation numbers show price rises are moderating.

Any such signs will support a belief that interest rates have peaked.

And Shell faces an acrimonious annual meeting.

The oil giant is trying to balance shareholder pressure for more profits, against demands by activist investors for faster action on climate change.

The Church of England Pensions Board is among those to say it will vote for more progress on an energy transition.