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Recent 52-Week Lows

Recent 52-Week Lows

2.81k followers31 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track stocks that have set 52-week lows within the last week. This list is generated daily, ranked by market cap and limited to the top 30 stocks that meet the criteria.

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  • Stephen Ross isn’t Trump’s only supporter — Here are other business leaders who have backed Trump
    Yahoo Finance

    Stephen Ross isn’t Trump’s only supporter — Here are other business leaders who have backed Trump

    CEOs of consumer-facing brands have been careful to align their companies in partisan Trump era politics. Here are some of the business leaders who have thrown dollars behind the President.

  • 3 Dividend Stocks Ideal for Retirees
    Motley Fool

    3 Dividend Stocks Ideal for Retirees

    These income stocks can make your retirement funds go even further.

  • Ferrari will expand its lineup of road cars, but not too much
    Reuters

    Ferrari will expand its lineup of road cars, but not too much

    Italian premium sports car maker Ferrari NV will expand sales of easier-driving grand touring cars, but will not try to chase rival Porsche's annual sales volume, Ferrari Chairman John Elkann told an audience of classic car enthusiasts gathered at this storied golf resort on the Pacific coast. Elkann also reiterated that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV , of which he is chairman, remains open to opportunities to combine with other automakers, but is positioned to remain independent. Fiat Chrysler in May proposed a merger with French automaker Renault SA, but the deal fell apart after the French government intervened and Elkann withdrew the proposed merger.

  • This Oil Stock Continues to Prove It's a Cash Flow-Gushing Machine
    Motley Fool

    This Oil Stock Continues to Prove It's a Cash Flow-Gushing Machine

    ConocoPhillips is not only producing gobs of free cash flow but also returning most of it to shareholders.

  • Top Stock Reports for Cisco, Medtronic & Novo Nordisk
    Zacks

    Top Stock Reports for Cisco, Medtronic & Novo Nordisk

    Top Stock Reports for Cisco, Medtronic & Novo Nordisk

  • Touch-Screens in Cars Don’t Make Us Safer – Yet
    Bloomberg

    Touch-Screens in Cars Don’t Make Us Safer – Yet

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Two years ago, 10 sailors died when the U.S. Navy’s guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with a chemical tanker off Singapore. An investigation has determined that insufficient training and inadequate operating procedures were to blame, and both factors were related to a new touch-screen-based helm control system. The Navy has decided to revert its destroyers back to entirely physical throttles and helm controls.It’s worth exploring the Navy’s rationale for installing touch-screens (“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” says Rear Admiral Bill Galinis), as well as its rationale for getting rid of them:Galinis said that bridge design is something that shipbuilders have a lot of say in, as it’s not covered by any particular specification that the Navy requires builders to follow. As a result of innovation and a desire to incorporate new technology, “we got away from the physical throttles, and that was probably the number-one feedback from the fleet – they said, just give us the throttles that we can use.”There are lessons here — including a prescient one from 50 years ago — for other, more mundane transport-control interfaces as well.Large, interactive touch-screens are becoming increasingly prevalent in passenger cars; in the case of Tesla, they’re the only control interface. They’re lovely to look at, but as the Navy’s experience suggests, they might be more confusing than physical controls. That confusion isn’t academic, either: Distracted driving is an increasingly dangerous problem. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 10% of all fatal crashes from 2012 to 2017 involved distracted drivers. Mobile phones are a major cause of distraction, as we’d expect, but they’re an even bigger problem for younger drivers.Almost 50 years ago, robotics professor Masahiro Mori wrote an extraordinary essay, “The Uncanny Valley,” on people’s reactions to robots as they became more and more humanlike. As Mori said, our affinity for robots rises as they more closely resemble humans. That affinity plunges, becoming negative and finally rising again once a robot reaches the (possibly unattainable) full likeness of a human being.Something similar is at work in our current touch-screen-filled vehicles. To an extent, adding more screen real estate give us more information, and with it more safety — until it begins to provide an overwhelming amount of information and an overly complex set of choices for visual navigation. And moving from one information-rich interface to another is increasingly difficult, as another Navy rear admiral said in reviewing the John S. McCain collision:When you look at a screen, where do you find heading? Is it in the same place, or do you have to hunt every time you go to a different screen? So the more commonality we can drive into these kind of human-machine interfaces, the better it is for the operator to quickly pick up what the situational awareness is, whatever aspect he’s looking at, whether it’s helm control, radar pictures, whatever. So we’re trying to drive that.There are two ways our in-car screens could evolve. The first is that, for safety’s sake, they’ll move back down the curve, so to speak, and be less ambiguous and more full of knobs and dials and physical throttles. That’s the Navy’s new approach. The second, though, is that we won’t go back, at least in passenger applications, to a more tactile interface of specific controls. We’re probably going to get more screens, with more information. Maybe the only way out of this valley is to shift the interface completely to voice or, in the very long run, to obviate the issue by having cars drive themselves. That could be how we navigate this uncanny valley of vehicle interfaces — the removal of any need to control the vehicle at all, and the chance to fill our cars’ screens with pure entertainment. Weekend readingA greener energy industry is testing investors’ ability to adapt. One coal CEO says “make money while you can” in an industry that is in terminal decline. The venture capital arm of Royal Dutch Shell Plc has invested in Corvus Energy, a maritime and offshore battery systems company. America’s obsession with beef is killing leather. A look at how Phoenix comes alive at night, and how other cities might too in a hotter world. An exploration of how extreme climate change has arrived in America. The Anthropocene is a joke. On a geological time scale, human civilization is an event, not an epoch. Three years of misery inside Google, the happiest company in tech. Here’s what happens when Apple Inc. locks you out of its walled garden after fraud suspicions. Machine vision can spot unknown links between classic artworks. When Midwest startups sell, their hometown schools often lose. A programmer in California got a “NULL” vanity license plate in the hopes that the word would not compute in a database of traffic offenders. Instead, he was fined $12,049. Robert Ballard, discoverer of the Titanic, is exploring a startling clue that may help him find Amelia Earhart’s plane.   Bugatti’s one-off La Voiture Noire debuted at the Pebble Beach Concours D’Elegance. It’s already been sold, for $18.68 million. Bloomberg Businessweek’s Peter Coy looks back on the 40 years since the magazine declared “ the death of equities.” Get Sparklines delivered to your inbox. Sign up here. And subscribe to Bloomberg All Access and get much, much more. You’ll receive our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, the Bloomberg Open and the Bloomberg Close.To contact the author of this story: Nathaniel Bullard at nbullard@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brooke Sample at bsample1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nathaniel Bullard is a BloombergNEF energy analyst, covering technology and business model innovation and system-wide resource transitions.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Motley Fool

    Why You Should Invest In International Stocks

    Especially if you're an American investor, chances are good that you'd benefit from more international diversification.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - S&P Rallies as Techs Climb and Trade Tensions Ease

    Investing.com - Stocks rallied Friday, finishing near their highs for the day, as trade tensions appeared to ease and reports suggested Germany might consider ideas to stimulate its faltering economy.

  • U.S. Oil Supplies Up for 2nd Week, Adds to Bearish Sentiment
    Zacks

    U.S. Oil Supplies Up for 2nd Week, Adds to Bearish Sentiment

    A U.S. government report reveals that crude inventories rose by 1.6 million barrels for the week ending Aug 9, very different to the 2.7 million barrels drawdown that energy analysts had expected.

  • Pharma Stock Roundup: Pipeline/Regulatory Updates From JNJ, LLY, AZN, RHHBY
    Zacks

    Pharma Stock Roundup: Pipeline/Regulatory Updates From JNJ, LLY, AZN, RHHBY

    FDA approves Roche's (RHHBY) tumor-agnostic medicine, Rozlytrek, J&J's Sirturo for young TB patients.

  • What to Expect From Baidu's Second-Quarter Earnings Report
    Motley Fool

    What to Expect From Baidu's Second-Quarter Earnings Report

    Expectations are low as the company faces tough headwinds.

  • Equinor's Mariner Oil Platform Comes Online at UK's North Sea
    Zacks

    Equinor's Mariner Oil Platform Comes Online at UK's North Sea

    Equinor's (EQNR) Mariner project is likely to churn out more than 300 million barrels of oil during its production cycle of 30 years and create 700 long-term jobs in the process.

  • Alibaba’s Tsai to Buy Brooklyn Nets and Barclays Arena for $3.5 Billion
    Bloomberg

    Alibaba’s Tsai to Buy Brooklyn Nets and Barclays Arena for $3.5 Billion

    (Bloomberg) -- There’s a new owner of the Brooklyn Nets.Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. Executive Vice Chairman Joe Tsai exercised his option to buy the rest of the team that he didn’t already control -- along with the Barclays Center arena -- ending Mikhail Prokhorov’s ownership tenure and bringing another deep-pocketed international presence to the National Basketball Association’s ranks.Financial terms weren’t disclosed, but a person familiar with the deal said Tsai paid about $3.5 billion, including debt, for the team and building.Tsai -- who has a net worth of $10.3 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index -- previously bought a 49% stake in the team at a $2.3 billion valuation, which is a record for a U.S. pro sports franchise. He had until 2021 to buy the remaining 51% of the franchise, which had its already-improved fortunes buoyed this off-season by the acquisition of star free agents Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant.Excitement is surging around the team, which has spent most of its New York City tenure in the shadow of the Manhattan-based New York Knicks. The Nets made the playoffs last season for the first time in four years, and adding Durant and Irving could drive all business-related activity such as ticket and suite sales and sponsorship.A Yale Law School graduate, Taiwan-born Tsai is one of Alibaba’s 18 founding members. Before being recruited by Jack Ma, chairman of the Chinese e-commerce giant, in 1999, he worked as a tax lawyer at Sullivan & Cromwell LLP. Tsai also owns the WNBA’s New York Liberty, and moved to the U.S. in 1977 to attend an elite boarding school in New Jersey.The sale requires approval of NBA owners, which is considered a formality since Tsai has already been vetted. The transaction should close by the end of September.As part of the shake-up at Prokhorov’s BSE Global, the parent company of the Nets and arena, Chief Executive Officer Brett Yormark announced his resignation.As the point person for the Nets relocation and revamp, Yormark led the transformation of the team from a moribund brand to a hip and trendy one. The team finished its first season in Brooklyn in the top five in merchandise sales after coming last the previous year. And a spot on the squad, 42-40 last season, is now coveted by top players in the NBA.The $3.5 billion price tag represents a hefty profit for Prokhorov, whose Onexim Sports & Entertainment in 2010 paid $223 million for an 80% stake of the team and a 45% share of the arena. In 2015, he consolidated ownership of the Nets and the arena in a deal with real estate developer Bruce Ratner’s Forest City Enterprises Inc. that valued the assets at around $1.7 billion.The National Basketball Association prefers that one owner control the team and the arena where it plays.Prokhorov, the first non-North American owner of an NBA team, also controls the Nassau Coliseum on Long Island. That building isn’t part of the sale to Tsai, whose sports holdings also include the National Lacrosse League team in San Diego.Rich Asians have been plowing money into professional sports franchises in Europe and around the world, though buying an NBA team is rare. Indonesian Erick Thohir, chairman of the Mahaka Group, was part of the group that owned the league’s Philadelphia 76ers, but has sold his stake.Chinese investors have taken more stakes in European soccer teams, including Aston Villa, West Bromwich Albion, Wolverhampton Wanderers and Southampton in England, Italy’s A.C. Milan and Inter Milan, Spain’s Atletico Madrid, and Slavia Prague in the Czech Republic. Though some of the deals haven’t worked out. The Atletico Madrid stake was subsequently sold, and Chinese billionaire Tony Xia, chairman of the Recon Group logistics firm, has given up control of Aston Villa.To contact the reporter on this story: Scott Soshnick in New York at ssoshnick@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Cécile DauratFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Gilead's (GILD) Filgotinib MAA for RA Accepted in Europe
    Zacks

    Gilead's (GILD) Filgotinib MAA for RA Accepted in Europe

    The EMA accepts Gilead (GILD) and Galapagos' MAA for filgotinib as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

  • E*TRADE's (ETFC) July 2019 DARTs Increase 1% From June
    Zacks

    E*TRADE's (ETFC) July 2019 DARTs Increase 1% From June

    E*TRADE's (ETFC) Daily Average Revenue Trades (DARTs) of 255,423, for July, mark an increase of 1% from the prior month.

  • LyondellBasell's Spheripol Selected by Sonatrach and TOTAL JV
    Zacks

    LyondellBasell's Spheripol Selected by Sonatrach and TOTAL JV

    LyondellBasell's (LYB) Spheripol technology enables customers to diversify and enhance their polypropylene product portfolio with outstanding monomer efficiency.

  • Near-Term Prospects for Investment Bank Industry Appear Gloomy
    Zacks

    Near-Term Prospects for Investment Bank Industry Appear Gloomy

    Near-Term Prospects for Investment Bank Industry Appear Gloomy

  • UBS Group Displays Prudent Cost Management: Should You Hold?
    Zacks

    UBS Group Displays Prudent Cost Management: Should You Hold?

    UBS Group's (UBS) is focused on achieving its performance targets through execution of cost management and several restructuring initiatives.

  • Schwab Declines 3% as July Net New Assets Fall Sequentially
    Zacks

    Schwab Declines 3% as July Net New Assets Fall Sequentially

    Decline in new asset balance is likely to hurt Schwab's (SCHW) financials going forward.

  • 'Too much damage has been done': strategist on US-China trade war
    Yahoo Finance

    'Too much damage has been done': strategist on US-China trade war

    Liz Ann Sonders the chief investment strategist and a senior vice president at Charles Schwab & Co. is skeptical about a comprehensive trade deal.

  • Here's Why Schlumberger (NYSE:SLB) Has A Meaningful Debt Burden
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's Why Schlumberger (NYSE:SLB) Has A Meaningful Debt Burden

    Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...

  • Bloomberg

    Apple, EU Set for September Showdown Over Record Tax Bill

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc.’s 13 billion-euro ($14.4 billion) battle with the European Union reaches the bloc’s courts next month in a hearing set to throw the spotlight on antitrust commissioner Margrethe Vestager’s crackdown on tax deals doled out to big companies.The EU’s General Court, its second-highest tribunal, will hear arguments in the challenges by the iPhone maker and Ireland over two days set for Sept. 17-18. The U.S. last year lost a bid to intervene in the case in support of Apple.The European Commission in August 2016 ordered Ireland to recoup the record sum plus interest, saying the world’s richest company was handed an unfair advantage. The EU decision reverberated across the Atlantic, triggering criticism from the U.S. Treasury that the EU was making itself a "supra-national tax authority" that could threaten global tax reform efforts.The Irish government said in an email it “profoundly disagrees” with the EU’s decision and “is engaging fully with the process and ensuring the best presentation of the state’s position.” The commission in Brussels declined to comment.Apple didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.Appeals over tax cases have been piling up at the EU’s courts since 2015, when the commission issued its first orders against Luxembourg and the Netherlands to recoup unpaid taxes from a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV unit and Starbucks Corp. respectively.The court heard arguments in both cases last year with rulings yet to come. A first ruling in the series of decisions by EU antitrust chief Vestager ended in a setback in February for the EU when Belgium won a bid to overturn an order to recoup about 800 million euros from 35 companies, including Anheuser-Busch InBev NV.(Updates with EU response in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Peter Flanagan.To contact the reporter on this story: Stephanie Bodoni in Luxembourg at sbodoni@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Christopher ElserFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Malaysia's Economic Growth Picks Up, Bucking Regional Headwinds
    Bloomberg

    Malaysia's Economic Growth Picks Up, Bucking Regional Headwinds

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Malaysia’s economic growth quickened in the second quarter as strong domestic demand and a rebound in commodity prices helped it weather a regional slowdown.Gross domestic product expanded 4.9% in the second quarter from a year ago, up from 4.5% in the previous three months, according to figures from the central bank. That was the strongest expansion since early 2018 and beat economists’ median estimate of 4.7%.Bank Negara Malaysia Governor Nor Shamsiah Mohd Yunus said the central bank expects full-year GDP growth of 4.3%-4.8%, affirming the previous estimate.Malaysia’s strong showing bucks the trend across the region, where the U.S.-China trade war has taken a toll on trade-reliant economies. Earlier this week neighboring Singapore cut its full-year growth forecast to almost zero, and Thailand is expected to roll out a stimulus package later Friday. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analysts on Thursday downgraded their forecasts for Asia’s four “Tiger” economies amid growing trade tensions.Weathering the StormIn addition to commodities strength, Malaysia’s manufacturing has also proven resilient, said Brian Tan, a regional economist at Barclays Bank Plc in Singapore. The question is how long Malaysia can skirt the headwinds."Our base scenario is that this is likely the peak for growth this year and we’ll see a slowdown in the second half," Tan said. "Headwinds from the trade war will grow ever harder, and on an aggregate level it won’t benefit anyone, not even Malaysia."Other key points from Friday’s data include: The economy grew 1% on a seasonally adjusted quarterly basis, slightly above the 0.9% estimate.All sectors expanded in the quarter but private consumption “remained as the main anchor to the economy,” growing 7.8%, chief statistician Mohd Uzir Mahidin said in a release. Net exports grew 22.9%, services gained 6.1% and manufacturing grew 4.3%.The current-account surplus stood at 14.3 billion ringgit in the second quarter, down slightly from 16.4 billion ringgit a quarter earlier but far above the 6.8 billion ringgit estimate.The mining sector expanded 2.9% on-year after shrinking in at least four previous quarters. Alex Holmes, an economist at Capital Economics, wrote in a research note that the economy would still struggle to pass the low end of the central bank’s target range, predicting it would come in at 4.2%. While consumer spending has surged since the government scrapped a goods and services tax last June, that boost will fade from the statistical base going forward."We doubt this is the start of a sustained rebound," Holmes said. "We are forecasting a renewed slowdown in the second half of this year, driven by weaker consumer spending and a challenging external environment."(Recasts lead, adds analyst comments from sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Anisah Shukry in Kuala Lumpur at ashukry2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nasreen Seria at nseria@bloomberg.net, Yudith Ho, Michael S. ArnoldFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • USD/CAD Daily Forecast – Bulls Awaiting the Critical US July Housing Data
    FX Empire

    USD/CAD Daily Forecast – Bulls Awaiting the Critical US July Housing Data

    US July Housing Market data releases would remain as the critical point of interest for traders today. On the daily chart, the Loonie pair was heading to the south side, recalling the Death Cross of mid-July.