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Big Game Advertising Winners

Big Game Advertising Winners

2.02k followers8 symbols Watchlist by LikeFolio

Among companies that advertised during the big game, these generated the highest positive social media activity as measured by LikeFolio.

Curated by LikeFolio

Background

The TD Ameritrade Ad Challenge, powered by LikeFolio, used proprietary social data tracking technology to see which publicly traded companies got the right buzz during the Big Game. The Ad Challenge tracked social sentiment of the public companies that advertised during the Big Game from 6 pm through 11 pm ET. The two key data points considered were the volume of tweets about the advertiser and the overall sentiment of the tweets. These companies were then ranked based on total number of positive tweets to determine the winner.

“These publicly traded companies spent a not-trivial amount of their advertising budget to run a spot in the big game," said Nicole Sherrod, managing director of trading, TD Ameritrade. “Just like our clients use social sentiment to validate whether consumers are favoring the products that a brand produces, we can use the same capability to gauge consumer reaction to TV commercials."

It’s one last gut check every investor should make before clicking buy or sell.

How did we choose these stocks?

We identified US-listed stocks and American Depository Receipts of companies that advertised during Super Bowl 51. We filtered out companies with a share price of less than $1.00 or a market capitalization less than $100 million, and excluded illiquid stocks by screening companies for liquidity i.e. average bid-ask spreads, dollar volume traded, etc.

Finally our proprietary optimization engine determined the constituent stocks based on the number of “definitely positive” mentions for their brands and products during the game. The eight companies with the highest positive mentions made it onto this list.

Who made these selections?

LikeFolio is a social data analytics firm specializing in quantifying consumer mentions of the brands and products owned by publicly traded companies.

How are these weighted?

Companies are equally weighted.

Performance

WatchlistChange Today1 Month Return1 Year ReturnTotal Return
Big Game Advertising Winners-0.93%+15.88%-24.95%-16.01%
^GSPC----

8 Symbols

SymbolCompany NameLast PriceChange% ChangeMarket TimeVolumeAvg Vol (3 month)Market Cap
KOThe Coca-Cola Company50.45-0.10-0.20%4:00 p.m. EDT23.75M15.51M216.70B
PEPPepsiCo, Inc.131.47-1.73-1.30%4:00 p.m. EDT7.47M4.12M182.04B
TMUST-Mobile US, Inc.110.72-1.19-1.06%4:00 p.m. EDT8.82M7.10M144.14B
BUDAnheuser-Busch InBev SA/NV57.56-0.44-0.76%4:00 p.m. EDT1.45M1.78M113.16B
GMGeneral Motors Company31.5-0.42-1.32%4:00 p.m. EDT15.02M14.70M45.08B
HMCHonda Motor Co., Ltd.24.72-0.21-0.84%4:00 p.m. EDT775.50k680.11k42.64B
VLKAYVolkswagen Aktiengesellschaft---6:07 p.m. EDT---
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