WMT - Walmart Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
119.78
+1.12 (+0.94%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close118.66
Open119.08
Bid119.53 x 800
Ask119.77 x 900
Day's Range118.92 - 119.80
52 Week Range85.78 - 125.38
Volume4144655
Avg. Volume5,058,195
Market Cap340B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.38
PE Ratio (TTM)23.96
EPS (TTM)5.00
Earnings DateFeb. 18, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.12 (1.79%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-05
1y Target Est130.24
  • 5 Cheap Stocks Under $10 to Buy for December Heading into 2020
    Zacks

    5 Cheap Stocks Under $10 to Buy for December Heading into 2020

    Today we found five stocks, with the help our Zacks Stock Screener, that are currently trading for under $10 per share that also sport a Zacks Rank 2 (Buy) or better that investors might want to buy in December heading into 2020...

  • Costco Sustains Decent Comparable Sales Run in November
    Zacks

    Costco Sustains Decent Comparable Sales Run in November

    Costco's (COST) better price management and strong membership trends have been playing a crucial role in driving comps. The metric improves 5.3% during the month of November.

  • 5 Blue Chip Stocks to Buy on the Dip for a Stronger Portfolio
    Zacks

    5 Blue Chip Stocks to Buy on the Dip for a Stronger Portfolio

    As stock market volatility continues, the blue-chip index is showing fluctuation. However, a closer look into the index reveals that not all stocks are erratic.

  • The Wrong Way to Fight Porch Pirates
    Bloomberg

    The Wrong Way to Fight Porch Pirates

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- One consequence of America’s Cyber Monday shopping binge is the imminent arrival of $9.4 billion worth of merchandise on the nation’s doorsteps. And that will cue the annual cries of frustration about porch pirates — along with a raft of local news stories on how to evade them, and a few viral tales of consumers attempting to spook them with booby-trapped packages or glitter bombs.The fixation on thwarting porch pirates is understandable. (I, for one, will confess to being irrationally angry recently when a $27 baby onesie was swiped from my front stoop.) But it is also a flawed way of thinking about a legitimate and persistent problem with e-commerce.The problem is not just theft. It is that shipping giants such as United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp., as well as big retailers, are not moving fast enough to make delivery of online orders more flexible and to turn over more control to shoppers.Consumers and neighborhood associations should spend less time trying to answer the question, “How can we create a world where expensive goods can sit on my doorstep for hours and not get stolen?” Instead, they should be asking, “How can we make it so that expensive goods are not left on my doorstep in the first place?”UPS and FedEx, to be fair, have made strides toward giving customers more options. Each has a network of thousands of access points where shoppers can pick up packages, including at ubiquitous stores such as Dollar General or CVS Pharmacy. Both shippers have apps that allow residents to provide delivery instructions for a driver.Retailers, too, are getting more creative. Amazon.com Inc. now offers the option of choosing a single day each week for all of your recent orders to arrive, making it easier to ensure you’ll be home when your haul is delivered. And both Amazon and Walmart Inc. are piloting services that rely on smart-home technology that allows a driver one-time, secure access to your home.Surely such a service, or some variation of it, will become commonplace within a decade. (After all, there was once a time when it was creepy to get in a stranger’s car, but thanks to Uber and Lyft that’s now ordinary.) For now, though, the choices for consumers are underwhelming or confusing — or, in some cases, both.For example, UPS and FedEx both trumpet the convenience of letting you reroute an in-progress shipment to an access point. But online shoppers aren’t able to fully take advantage because retailers can put restrictions on packages preventing the recipient from redirecting them. This is likely a well-intentioned anti-fraud tactic, but it means access points aren’t the reliable solution they’re cracked up to be.And retailers aren’t always great at steering customers toward desirable secure options. Amazon, for example, routinely tries to nudge me at checkout to try a pickup point that is a 30-minute drive from my home, even though there is a Whole Foods Market with Amazon lockers in walking distance.But there are bigger ideas that could do even more to ensure package security. What if UPS or FedEx were to more routinely provide narrower time windows for drop-offs, or to allocate more workers for nighttime deliveries when nine-to-fivers are likely to be at home? What if retailers allowed customers to choose their shipping provider at checkout, which might force shippers to compete for their loyalty?Such changes would further complicate the “last-mile” delivery challenges the industry has been addressing for decades, and would likely add costs. But these are the same logistics experts and retailers that were able to make speedy two-day delivery standard.  It’s not unreasonable to expect them to innovate their way to giving shoppers more choice.Even if it’s difficult, improved delivery flexibility is a far better remedy for porch piracy than other headline-grabbing approaches. Police departments have experimented with planting bait packages on doorsteps that are outfitted with GPS trackers, potentially allowing them to catch individual thieves. Texas has a new law on the books that makes package theft punishable by up to 10 years in prison.Never mind that there are already laws against theft. These kinds of punitive measures are not useless, but they are likely to be helpful only in a limited area for a limited period of time.The more productive approach is to focus on reducing the unsecured supply of porch treasures. And no one is better equipped to attack that problem than the retailers and shippers. So shoppers should raise their expectations of these companies and demand that they do more.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • How a Vegan, Alcohol-Free Christmas Is Taking Over the World
    Bloomberg

    How a Vegan, Alcohol-Free Christmas Is Taking Over the World

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- This Christmas, instead of a free-range turkey, how about a beef-less Wellington washed down with a few glasses of “Nosecco”? And rather than falling asleep watching the Queen, why not tune in to your inner self with a spot of meditation?This might not sound like traditional festive fun, but now that the craze for all things vegan has crossed the Atlantic, it’s what British retailers are betting on to lift sluggish supermarket sales and see off brutal conditions on the high street, at least for a spell.A rough estimate suggests that across the big U.K. supermarket chains, meat-free offerings of traditional Christmas fare are up by between 40% and 400% this year. This underlines how veganism has moved from niche to mainstream over the course of 2019 as more  consumers cut out animal products altogether, or reduce their meat intake with a “flexitarian” diet. Just look at the popularity of the vegan sausage roll introduced by baker Greggs Plc. There’s likely to be at least one vegan at any big Christmas gathering, and so being able to cater for them with plant-based canapés is crucial. And while many families won’t ditch the turkey altogether, they may well replace another meat protein, such as beef or gammon, with a fancy nut roast, savory yule log or vegetable wreath. Sales of plant-based substitutes still represent a small share of the overall grocery market, but they can have a significant influence over shopping habits. Being able to buy a good selection of food for a vegan daughter, for example, is likely to determine where shoppers fill up their grocery carts for the whole family. No wonder the category has become a key battleground.There’s another reason why it’s worth supermarkets’ while to go vegan. Plant-based versions of festive favorites such as pigs in blankets tend to be more complex to make and require innovative ingredients. J Sainsbury Plc is this year offering party food made from the blossom of the banana tree, which can be used as a substitute for fish. This builds on the popularity of the jackfruit, a tropical fruit that is a good alternative to pulled pork. All of this added value means supermarkets can charge a premium.QuicktakeThe Vegan EconomyThat won’t last forever though. The U.K. arms of the German discounters Aldi and Lidl are piling into this market too. Lidl has two Christmas-specific vegan lines, while Aldi has nine, including pastry crowns and vegan cocktail sausage rolls. Neither had a plant-based offering last year. Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc recently cut the price of its foods that are free from certain ingredients, such as gluten, while Tesco Plc has launched an affordable plant-based range.In another sign of the times, supermarkets this Christmas season are bulking up on party drinks that are low in alcohol, or contain none at all. Not only do they  tend to be premium products, particularly non-alcoholic spirits, but retailers don’t pay duty. So, while they can charge the same or more for a fancy but sober drink, they get to keep a bigger slice of the selling price.It helps that the market is growing rapidly, as many consumers, particularly younger people captivated more by their social media feeds than their real social life, reduce their alcohol intake. Beer led the way, spawning Budweiser’s Prohibition Brew and Brewdog’s Nanny State, with wines and particularly spirits exploding this year. Demand from supermarket shoppers follows the trend in clubs and pubs where “mocktails” are now a staple of the cocktail menu. Going on the wagon is usually associated with January, but the run-up to Christmas can also be a time for restraint as people become more conscious of pacing themselves through rounds of festive events, not to mention all of those designated drivers. Asda, the U.K. arm of Walmart Inc., estimated that December sales of low- and no-alcohol drinks are double those of the average month. It’s all part of the new mood around Christmas, characterized by rising environmental awareness and a focus on health and wellness. Throw in the ongoing uncertainty around Brexit and the general election, and there are fewer celebrity blockbuster Christmas advertisements this year, with most retailers returning to traditional themes such as family and nostalgia for the past.Even tree trimmings are falling in with the trend. The Sanctuary range from John Lewis features pastel hued baubles including Buddha heads and an ornament depicting a woman reclining in a luxurious bubble bath. Its focus is on serenity — something that’s often in short supply over the busy festive season.After the decorations come down, consumers may continue to embrace plant-based diets with Veganuary, which has rocketed in popularity over the past five years. Dry January will bolster sales of no- and low-alcohol ranges.  But beyond that, it could well be retailers themselves that are in need of some self-care. The months following the holidays are often lean ones, as consumers rein in spending after the excess of Christmas. It can also be tricky for supermarkets to accurately gauge demand and control waste when consumers switch in and out of different food and drink trends so dramatically. This year could be particularly hard if the election is followed by the return of fretting over Brexit. So these swings will be an extra burden to manage.The New Year hangover may still be with us, even if it is an alcohol-free one.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Kroger (KR) Earnings Miss Estimates in Q3, Decline Y/Y
    Zacks

    Kroger (KR) Earnings Miss Estimates in Q3, Decline Y/Y

    Kroger's (KR) third-quarter sales fell short of the Zacks Consensus Estimate. This was the second straight quarter of sales miss. Nonetheless, management forecast identical sales growth of 2-2.25% for fiscal 2019.

  • Kroger Needs to Pare Down Its Grocery List
    Bloomberg

    Kroger Needs to Pare Down Its Grocery List

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It was never going to be easy for Kroger Co., the nation’s largest supermarket chain, to play defense at a moment of colossal change in the grocery business.That was apparent in its Thursday earnings report, in which revenue and adjusted earnings per share revenue came in slightly below analysts’ expectations, sending shares down. (On the bright side, comparable sales growth accelerated, increasing 2.5% from a year earlier.)The patchy results are the latest reason to doubt that this company is going to be able to transform itself for a more digital-centric future before it’s too late.At a presentation for analysts last month, CEO Rodney McMullen acknowledged that, two years into a three-year turnaround plan, the company has come up short. In particular, he said, “we asked our store associates to do too many things at once,” a reference to its efforts to remodel stores and make better use of shelf space while simultaneously ramping up its click-and-collect business.It is concerning that Kroger apparently has found it so difficult to do retailing battle on multiple fronts. After all, that is simply the reality of being a major brick-and-mortar chain these days, and key rivals seem to be managing it just fine.Target Corp. has renovated about 700 stores since 2017 and has also managed to roll out same-day delivery via Shipt and expand curbside pickup. In the latest quarter, 80% of its digital growth came from those and other same-day fulfillment options. Walmart Inc. has had similar success, developing an online grocery operation that is competitive with Amazon.com Inc.’s while also making physical stores cleaner and better-stocked.It’s not just that Kroger needs to be able to multitask. It also needs a better plan to win at online grocery.In a recent press release, Kroger proudly touted that, as a holiday season promotion, it would offer online grocery pickup for free and waive the usual $4.95 fee. Are shoppers seriously supposed to be impressed by that when pickup is always free at Walmart and Target? If Kroger can’t match that offering, it’s hard to see how it is going to fight effectively for digital grocery market share.Kroger’s biggest e-commerce bet is its partnership with Ocado Group Plc to build automated warehouses for grocery delivery. But those efficiencies will only matter if it can build a substantial base of online customers. And the cost of building these one-of-a-kind facilities, executives have said recently, is coming in higher than expected.In the meantime, Kroger continues to make head-scratching moves such as its foray into the world of so-called “dark kitchens,” or delivery-only food preparation facilities. Through a partnership with the cheekily named ClusterTruck, it announced this week, Kroger will experiment with on-demand delivery of prepared meals.This effectively puts the supermarket chain in competition for the diners that Grubhub, Doordash and Uber Eats are after. This category has enormous growth potential, so Kroger’s ambitions are understandable. But it’s also an area in which restaurant and technology companies have a head start and seem destined to outflank Kroger. And the whole venture seems like a distraction from the more pressing mission of shoring up its positioning in its core grocery business.Kroger’s three-year plan was underwhelming when it was unveiled two years ago, and since then the company hasn’t consistently impressed with its execution. Kroger is undoubtedly a busy company, but it’s not clear all the hustle is making it a better one.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bitcoin shopping app Lolli has quietly added big names like Walmart and Ulta
    Yahoo Finance

    Bitcoin shopping app Lolli has quietly added big names like Walmart and Ulta

    Lolli, a plug-in that gives shoppers cash-back rewards in bitcoin, has added big names like Walmart, Macy's, Ulta, and Hilton. But that doesn't mean those companies are publicly supporting bitcoin.

  • Kroger (KR) to Report Q3 Earnings as Amazon Guns for Supermarket Space
    Zacks

    Kroger (KR) to Report Q3 Earnings as Amazon Guns for Supermarket Space

    Kroger (KR) will report its third quarter financial performance before the opening bell on Thursday, December 5.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, Target, Amazon, eBay and Macy's
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, Target, Amazon, eBay and Macy's

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, Target, Amazon, eBay and Macy's

  • Income Investors: This High Dividend Paying Canadian REIT Makes a Great Addition to Your Portfolio
    The Motley Fool

    Income Investors: This High Dividend Paying Canadian REIT Makes a Great Addition to Your Portfolio

    Here's why you need to invest in SmartCenter REIT which has an occupancy level of 98% and counts Walmart as its largest client.

  • Not Santa, Trade Will Rule This December: ETFs to Your Rescue
    Zacks

    Not Santa, Trade Will Rule This December: ETFs to Your Rescue

    Despite the age-old trend of a Santa rally, 2018 was a massive downer. Since 2019 is giving the same cues, investors can seek refuge in these safer ETFs.

  • Dollar General Q3 Earnings on Deck: Can DG Stock Reach New Highs?
    Zacks

    Dollar General Q3 Earnings on Deck: Can DG Stock Reach New Highs?

    Dollar General (DG) is set to report its third quarter earnings before the market opens on Thursday, December 5.

  • This Misunderstood High-Yield Canadian REIT Is Too Cheap to Ignore
    The Motley Fool

    This Misunderstood High-Yield Canadian REIT Is Too Cheap to Ignore

    SmartCentres REIT (TSX:SRU.UN) is a cheap high-yield retail REIT that many Canadian investors don't fully understand.

  • Top ETF Stories of November
    Zacks

    Top ETF Stories of November

    Inside the key ETF events of the month of November.

  • Can Retailers Close in on Amazon (AMZN) this Holiday Season?
    Zacks

    Can Retailers Close in on Amazon (AMZN) this Holiday Season?

    Competition between major retailers and e-commerce companies is heating up as they elbow for position during Cyber Monday and beyond.

  • Walmart tops Amazon as most-downloaded US shopping app on Black Friday
    TechCrunch

    Walmart tops Amazon as most-downloaded US shopping app on Black Friday

    Amazon says Cyber Monday 2019 has now become the retailer's biggest shopping day of all time, based on the number of items sold worldwide. This year, Walmart became the No. 1 shopping app in the U.S. on Black Friday for the first time ever, according to Sensor Tower's analysis. Walmart's app reached No. 1 among all shopping in the U.S. after peaking on Thanksgiving as No. 6 among all apps (not just shopping), noted App Annie, based on both iOS and Android downloads.

  • Kroger Partners With ClusterTruck for Meal Delivery Service
    Zacks

    Kroger Partners With ClusterTruck for Meal Delivery Service

    Kroger (KR) has been strengthening its position in the omnichannel food retail space. With the help of ClusterTruck, the company will be able to offer multiple food items from one central kitchen.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, NIKE, Citigroup, Intel and ResMed
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, NIKE, Citigroup, Intel and ResMed

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, NIKE, Citigroup, Intel and ResMed

  • A Sneak Peek Into Hits & Flops of Black Friday in 2019
    Zacks

    A Sneak Peek Into Hits & Flops of Black Friday in 2019

    Although Black Friday 2019 witnesses a steep slump in offline shopping, it gains traction from a solid surge on the online platform. Given this scenario, we enumerate some winners and losers.

  • Buy Dollar General (DG) Stock Ahead of Earnings Amid Retail Strength?
    Zacks

    Buy Dollar General (DG) Stock Ahead of Earnings Amid Retail Strength?

    Let's take a look at what's going on with Dollar General and what to expect from its upcoming third-quarter earnings report to see if investors should consider buying the discount retailer's stock...

  • More than half of all Black Friday purchases came from a mobile device: Salesforce
    Yahoo Finance

    More than half of all Black Friday purchases came from a mobile device: Salesforce

    Smartphone shoppers increased this holiday season, according to Salesforce data.

  • Top Stock Reports for Walmart, Nike & Citigroup
    Zacks

    Top Stock Reports for Walmart, Nike & Citigroup

    Top Stock Reports for Walmart, Nike & Citigroup

  • Etsy is off to a hot start this holiday online shopping season
    Yahoo Finance

    Etsy is off to a hot start this holiday online shopping season

    Etsy sees impressive start to the holiday shopping season.

  • Industrial fire triggers emergency air-quality alerts in Arkansas town
    ABC News Videos

    Industrial fire triggers emergency air-quality alerts in Arkansas town

    The blaze at a Styrofoam factory threw a huge plume of smoke into the air over Bentonville; students at local schools were ordered to stay inside but no injuries were reported.