SQ - Square, Inc.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
57.05
-0.80 (-1.39%)
As of 12:19PM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close57.85
Open57.07
Bid56.83 x 1000
Ask56.86 x 1000
Day's Range56.39 - 57.43
52 Week Range49.82 - 101.15
Volume3,948,405
Avg. Volume8,791,447
Market Cap24.367B
Beta (3Y Monthly)3.11
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.13
Earnings DateNov 5, 2019 - Nov 11, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est81.03
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Bloomberg

    No Banking Charter? No Problem. Fintechs Team Up With Small-Town Banks

    (Bloomberg) -- Customers of Square Inc., the Silicon Valley payments behemoth, might assume that the cash they send to friends on the platform is housed in a glassy building in Silicon Valley, tended to by hoodie-clad tech workers. Actually, that money is more likely to be sitting in a 117-year-old community bank in Iowa.Partnerships between high-flying tech companies and traditional banks, many of them tiny by comparison, are a key force behind the financial technology boom. Because virtually no tech companies have the license required to perform banking services, many of them partner with existing banks to offer a suite of services including checking accounts, credit cards and the back-end and regulatory work the tech companies aren’t equipped—or allowed—to handle.Now, driven by the tech industry’s thirst to jump into finance, a new crop of businesses are looking to broker the connections between tech and banks. One such business is Cambr, a little-known division of an investment company called StoneCastle, which counts Square and other fintechs as customers. StoneCastle works with more than 800 small banks, spread across the country, ready to take and hold deposits from Silicon Valley startups like Square.“Airbnb, one would argue they are one of the largest hotel chains that doesn't own a room,” said Josh Siegel, chief executive of StoneCastle Partners LLC. “Our network works in a similar way. We have an account at the bank, it's the room we rent, and we can rent it out to whoever we want.”Cambr’s service launched last year as a partnership between StoneCastle, which provides the bank connections, and digital banking platform Q2 Holdings Inc., which works on the software and programming. Square’s Cash App was one of Cambr’s first customers, Siegel said, and it has since added startups like Acorns Grow Inc., MoneyLion Inc., Qapital Inc. and robo-adviser Betterment LLC, in a recently announced deal.What Cambr aims to offer tech companies is a ready-made strategy to accept deposits that they wouldn’t otherwise have the license to handle. Here’s how it works: A tech company or startup might give Cambr as much as $100 billion of customers’ cash, and could then ask the service to spread the money around to potentially hundreds of different financial institutions. A result of spreading out the deposits is that more of the fintech’s cash is insured under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.’s $250,000-per-account guarantee, offering more coverage than if the money were deposited at a single institution.A Salve for Digital DisruptionThe partnership model, which has rapidly become the go-to for financial technology companies, does pose some risks for banks, particularly if fast-moving startups draw the ire of regulators, as has happened before. “The banks are the supervised entities so the buck stops with them,” said Brian Korn, partner and head of fintech practice at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips. “The regulators are waiting for situations where there’s a breakdown.”But many community banks have embraced such partnerships, seeing them as a salve in times of digital disruption. More deposits can allow small banks to grow and make more local loans. In Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the 117-year-old Lincoln Savings Bank, which works with Cambr, has boosted its revenue by partnering with fintechs, said Mike McCrary, who runs e-commerce and emerging technology for the bank. McCrary said that when Lincoln Savings Bank considered how it could best position itself for the next 10 years, fintech partnerships were an obvious answer. “In order for us to be relevant years from now, there had to be something digital,” he said. “Now we’re putting a lot of resources into this area of our business,” including, he said, building out a new team dedicated to working with tech companies.  While the partnerships have injected cash into many small banks, some industry watchers have wondered if those banks could be left in a lurch if fintechs eventually got their own banking charters. If they did, community banks could find themselves as direct competitors to tech companies, without the same digital capabilities. But so far tech companies have made scant progress toward winning banking charters, particularly as government concern over digital financial services has grown. Some members of the U.S. Federal Reserve have voiced concern over fintech’s risk management capabilities. And Facebook Inc.’s foray into cryptocurrency has drawn ire from lawmakers.One option for tech companies has been to apply for an Industrial Loan Charter, which would effectively grant them license to provide financial services. Square first applied for the charter in the fall of 2017, but its request shows no signs of being approved. Social Finance Inc. also applied for an ILC, but withdrew its application altogether.“It’s not easy to become a bank here, and we haven’t seen much traction in general with the ILC,” Matt Burton, partner at venture capital firm QED Investors, said. “What we have seen is continued demand for non-banks to offer banking solutions.”Picking PartnersPartnering with multiple small banks is just one option for fintechs. Some, like Apple Inc. which developed a credit card with Goldman Sachs Group Inc., have teamed up with one big bank instead. But there are advantages to Cambr’s many-bank strategy. Some tech companies favor “the network approach over the big bank because they can negotiate better rates because both parties are getting something they want,'' said Lindsay Davis, a senior analyst at CB Insights. Smaller banks are also more likely to play ball because they aren’t developing competing services.“For the big banks, they are optimizing for customer acquisition and cross-selling services,” Davis said. “So a tech firm getting into financial services might be cannibalizing an existing business.” Joe Yeres, Cambr’s vice president of business development, is partly responsible for brokering the connections with community institutions, and travels a few times a month to places like Waterloo, Iowa, and Kansas City, Mo., where some of the banks it works with are located. The trips were eye-opening, Yeres said.“I was born and raised in New York metro, so the whole thing is a little funny to me,” Yeres said. “I was done with one of the leads of the banking team, and we went out for drinks after work one day, and walking around Waterloo it was like this guy was the mayor, everyone knew him. It was like, ‘Wow, this is how this part of the world works.’”Eventually, Cambr has its sights set on a bigger prize: It wants to handle deposits from the tech giants, not just the startups. Many industry watchers believe large tech companies will eventually move to offer more financial services, as Apple already has with the Apple Card. But Siegel realizes that Cambr, the little-known product of the relatively little-known StoneCastle and Q2, faces some hurdles. “Do they want to take a risk on a younger platform?” he asks, and in doing so, “upset big finance, which they’ll still have to work with on some things?”Still, Siegel is pitching the titans of tech, as they continue to march deeper into the world of finance. He adds: “We've probably been out and visited with almost all of them.”To contact the author of this story: Julie Verhage in New York at jverhage2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.net, Mark MilianFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Square Stock: Jim Cramer Says It’s Worth Buying
    Market Realist

    Square Stock: Jim Cramer Says It’s Worth Buying

    Jim Cramer thinks that Square stock is worth owning. The stock has upside potential. According to Cramer, investors should buy the stock when it falls.

  • Square (SQ) Stock Moves -1.21%: What You Should Know
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    Square (SQ) Stock Moves -1.21%: What You Should Know

    Square (SQ) closed at $59.03 in the latest trading session, marking a -1.21% move from the prior day.

  • Western Union Partners Amazon for Cash Payments Facility
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    Western Union Partners Amazon for Cash Payments Facility

    Western Union (WU) teams up with Amazon to provide payment services to online shoppers.

  • Why Are Analysts Losing Confidence in Square Stock?
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    Why Are Analysts Losing Confidence in Square Stock?

    Square (SQ) stock has remained highly volatile this year. The company's troubles started in October 2018 when CFO Sarah Friar decided to leave the company.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PayPal, Square, Intuit, Apple and JPMorgan Chase
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    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PayPal, Square, Intuit, Apple and JPMorgan Chase

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PayPal, Square, Intuit, Apple and JPMorgan Chase

  • Does JPMorgan's Same-Day Deposit Put PYPL & Others in Danger?
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    Does JPMorgan's Same-Day Deposit Put PYPL & Others in Danger?

    Digital payments space heats up with growing proliferation of instant and same-day deposit services being offered by JPMorgan Chase, Square, PayPal and others.

  • Facebook Faces EU Scrutiny, France & Germany to Block Libra
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    Facebook Faces EU Scrutiny, France & Germany to Block Libra

    Facebook's (FB) Libra cryptocurrency is facing enhanced scrutiny from central bankers and government regulators, worldwide.

  • Bull of the Day: Fiserv, Inc. (FISV)
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    Bull of the Day: Fiserv, Inc. (FISV)

    Bull of the Day: Fiserv, Inc. (FISV)

  • Square (SQ) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
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    Square (SQ) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    Square (SQ) closed the most recent trading day at $58.32, moving +0.92% from the previous trading session.

  • Jack Dorsey's Square Is Testing a New Free Stock-Trading Service
    Bloomberg

    Jack Dorsey's Square Is Testing a New Free Stock-Trading Service

    (Bloomberg) -- Jack Dorsey’s Square Inc. already lets customers buy and sell Bitcoin on its popular Cash App. Soon, it may let them buy and sell stocks. Square is testing out a new Cash App feature that would enable users to make free stock trades, according to a video outlining the product’s features seen by Bloomberg. While the exact date of its launch is yet to be determined, employees began testing the new feature in recent weeks, according to a person familiar with the company who asked not to be identified discussing private matters.A spokesman for Square declined to comment.The free stock trading feature would position Square as a direct competitor to fintech startup Robinhood Markets Inc., which has gained millions of customers by offering no-fee trading, and most recently garnered a valuation of $7.6 billion. Robinhood has since expanded into other offerings such as options trading and margin trading, which would not be offered in Square’s initial product, the person said. Eventually, Square’s new service and others like it could pose a challenge to more established online brokers, like E*Trade Financial Corp.“We are seeing the cadence of free trading increase and I do think that’s something the broader industry can’t dismiss,” said Devin Ryan, an analyst with JMP Securities. “As a result, the pricing in those areas will continue to move lower.”Cash App and other peer to peer payment platforms are known for having a young customer base, similar to Robinhood. If Robinhood is any indication of the interest in free trading, Square could quickly gain a lot of traction. Prior to Robinhood's launch, it had a waitlist of 1 million people. Near the end of 2018, it said it had more than 6 million users, though it's unclear how many of them are active on the platform.Square’s Cash App started out by letting users send money to friends, and has since expanded into debit cards and Bitcoin trading. While Square doesn't consistently give updates on how many people are using Cash App, the company said it had more than 15 million monthly active users as of last December. Though there isn’t an immediate path to profitability for most free financial products, the race to add more users to platforms like Cash App has been fierce, with other businesses like PayPal Holdings Inc.’s Venmo also seeing big growth.Right now, fintech companies offering such products largely make money on the interchange fees when customers use their debit cards or on fees they charge for transferring funds to banks instantly. In its most recent letter to shareholders, Square said that revenue from Cash App was $135 million for the quarter, excluding Bitcoin. In a note published earlier this month, KeyBanc analyst Josh Beck said revenue from Cash App could reach $2 billion over the next three years. (Updates with analyst quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the author of this story: Julie Verhage in New York at jverhage2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.net, Mark MilianTom GilesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Western Union to Expand in Canada With Paramount Commerce
    Zacks

    Western Union to Expand in Canada With Paramount Commerce

    Western Union (WU) ties up with Paramount Commerce to enable online account-funded money transfers.

  • What in the WORLD is going on?
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    What in the WORLD is going on?

    John Blank joins us to discuss possible solutions for the current trade war and what we can expect moving forward in the current environment.

  • Fintech Stocks To Add To Your Portfolio Of The Future
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    Fintech Stocks To Add To Your Portfolio Of The Future

    It is time to put some money into the future of our economy.

  • 3 Hot Stocks to Buy in September
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    3 Hot Stocks to Buy in September

    The weather might be getting cooler, but these stocks have what it takes to keep heating up.

  • Bloomberg

    Fintech Startup Stripe Will Lend Money to Customers

    (Bloomberg) -- Stripe Inc. became one of the most valuable financial-technology startups by helping businesses accept online payments. Now it’s getting into lending.The San Francisco-based company launched Stripe Capital on Thursday. The service will start in the U.S. and will make loans to businesses that are already Stripe customers, as well as merchants selling on services like Shopify that use Stripe to process payments. Stripe will use the data it has on customers to help determine loan eligibility and terms. The first target market will be smaller businesses that use Stripe, rather than larger customers, such as Amazon.com Inc., that already have access to cash.Stripe Capital will start out by focusing on loans of about $10,000 to $20,000, according to Stripe Co-Founder John Collison. Much like Jack Dorsey’s payments firm Square Inc., which has its own lending service called Square Capital, Stripe has access to a wide swath of data on its customers. “We can constantly be looking at the businesses on Stripe, their cash flow, how they are growing, and who can be productively underwritten for a loan,’’ Collison said.Tech companies have become an increasingly popular lending source in recent years. After the 2008 financial crisis, traditional banks pulled back on small business loans, prompting many companies to look elsewhere for capital. Almost a third of loan applicants turned to online lenders in 2018, up from 24% in 2017 and 19% in 2016, according to a Federal Reserve survey.As the industry has become more digital, PayPal Holdings Inc., Square and even Amazon have introduced small business lending programs, as have a slew of startups including SoftBank Group Corp.-backed Kabbage Inc. and public company OnDeck Capital Inc.Though lending poses risks, Stripe, much like other payment services, says the extra data it has on customers will give it a better idea of whether borrowers can repay loans. The company believes that edge will protect it from significant losses during an economic downturn.“Lending is fundamentally a business that performs very differently based on where we are in the business cycle,” Collison said. “We’re doing as much as we can at the current point with models based on data that we can get from business performance and how small businesses performed in the financial crisis.’’ He added that the product was built with the possibility of an economic shock in mind, and that the company plans to be  “appropriately cautious.’’To contact the author of this story: Julie Verhage in New York at jverhage2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Will Square Do With Its Caviar Money?
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    What Will Square Do With Its Caviar Money?

    The payment processing specialist sold the food delivery service for $410 million last month.

  • Square Is Getting a Lot of Love From Analysts
    Motley Fool

    Square Is Getting a Lot of Love From Analysts

    The payment services provider's stock has struggled of late, but some analysts think the company is on the rebound.

  • Is It Time to Get Bullish on Square Stock?
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    Is It Time to Get Bullish on Square Stock?

    Three analysts think so.

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    3 Growth Stocks to Buy and Hold for the Next 50 Years

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    Here's My Top Stock to Buy in September

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  • 3 Top Stocks to Buy in September
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    3 Top Stocks to Buy in September

    Summer is winding down. But these three stocks should be hot for a long time to come.

  • Why Is Square (SQ) Down 23.6% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Square (SQ) Down 23.6% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Square (SQ) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Zacks Value Trader Highlights: Square, Keycorp, Comerica, Delta and Apple
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    Zacks Value Trader Highlights: Square, Keycorp, Comerica, Delta and Apple

    Zacks Value Trader Highlights: Square, Keycorp, Comerica, Delta and Apple

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    Fintech Stocks to Make Your Portfolio Shine

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