NCLH - Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
15.66
-0.41 (-2.55%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close16.07
Open15.28
Bid15.86 x 1100
Ask15.85 x 3200
Day's Range15.05 - 16.06
52 Week Range7.03 - 59.78
Volume66,161,850
Avg. Volume44,096,165
Market Cap4.014B
Beta (5Y Monthly)2.77
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-4.99
Earnings DateAug. 06, 2020 - Aug. 10, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est30.54
  • Why Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Stocks Sank Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Stocks Sank Today

    Cruise-ship stocks gave up some of their recent gains on Thursday. Shares of Carnival (NYSE: CCL), Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL), and Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings (NYSE: NCLH) fell 7.6%, 4.8%, and 8.6%, respectively. Many travel-related companies saw their stock prices rally as the markets resumed trading after Memorial Day weekend.

  • GlobeNewswire

    NCL Corporation Ltd. Announces Closing of $400 Million Investment by L Catterton

    NCLC expects to use the net proceeds from the placement of the Private Exchangeable Notes for general corporate purposes. The Private Exchangeable Notes will be general senior unsecured obligations of NCLC, guaranteed by NCLH, and will be exchangeable at the holder’s option at any time prior to the close of business on the business day immediately preceding the maturity date into Series A Preference Shares of NCLC, which shall be automatically exchangeable into a number of ordinary shares of NCLH.

  • If You Invested $1,000 in Norwegian Cruise Line’s IPO, Here's How Much Money You’d Have Now
    Motley Fool

    If You Invested $1,000 in Norwegian Cruise Line’s IPO, Here's How Much Money You’d Have Now

    With shares down 70% for the year, Norwegian Cruise Lines (NYSE: NCLH) is feeling the same pain as all cruise lines right now. Cruise line don't offer a huge amount of utility to the average consumer. The success of an investment in the cruise liner's IPO is no longer there.

  • Norwegian Cruise Line (NCLH) Looks Good: Stock Adds 9.7% in Session
    Zacks

    Norwegian Cruise Line (NCLH) Looks Good: Stock Adds 9.7% in Session

    Norwegian Cruise Line (NCLH) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 9% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • Why Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Stocks Jumped -- Then Slumped -- Wednesday
    Motley Fool

    Why Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Stocks Jumped -- Then Slumped -- Wednesday

    In the first few minutes of trading Wednesday, shares of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings (NYSE: NCLH), Carnival Corporation (NYSE: CCL), and Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL) rushed forward in near lockstep, rising 11.3%, 11.5%, and 11.6% -- but the rally didn't last the hour. Seems investors can't make up their minds what's going on with the cruise industry today. Clearly cruise stocks are moving as a group, and not based on how investors weigh their individual merits -- which isn't surprising.

  • Why Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Stocks Surged 10% (and More) Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Stocks Surged 10% (and More) Today

    A holiday weekend, a new week, and a new coronavirus vaccine candidate -- these three factors helped spark a new stock rally Tuesday, and cruise line stocks Carnival Corporation (NYSE: CCL), Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL), and Norwegian Cruise Line (NYSE: NCLH) are key beneficiaries of the optimism today. In 1 p.m. EDT trading, shares of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings stock are up a whopping 15.0%, with Carnival (up 12.7%) and Royal Caribbean (up 13.8%) shares not far behind.

  • Credit Suisse initiates Royal Caribbean, Norwegian Cruise Lines at outperform
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Credit Suisse initiates Royal Caribbean, Norwegian Cruise Lines at outperform

    On Thursday, Credit Suisse analysts led by Benjamin Chaiken initiated coverage of the cruise line industry with an outperform rating of Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Lines, and a neutral rating of Carnival Corporation. The firm thinks that while COVID-19 will likely have "a lasting impact on the cruise industry, the unmatched value proposition of the product will be a driving force behind a recovery". The Final Round panel discusses the sector’s outlook.

  • Why Shares of Norwegian Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean, and Carnival All Jumped on Thursday
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Norwegian Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean, and Carnival All Jumped on Thursday

    Volatility continues to be the name of the game for cruise line stocks in May, and Thursday's trading is no different. Today, the catalyst for shares surging was a Credit Suisse analyst initiating relatively positive coverage on cruise line stocks. Shares of Norwegian Cruise Line (NYSE: NCLH) jumped as much as 12.3%, Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL) was up 10.7% early in trading, and Carnival (NYSE: CCL) rose 6.9%.

  • This Analyst Sees Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean as Good Bets
    Motley Fool

    This Analyst Sees Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean as Good Bets

    The cruise ship industry has been tempest-tost as the COVID-19 pandemic shipwrecked the stocks of Carnival (NYSE: CCL), Norwegian Cruise Line (NYSE: NCLH), and Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL) over the last three months with losses of 60% or more. Chaiken initiated coverage on Carnival, Norwegian, and Royal, though he sees the latter two cruise lines as better investments.

  • Analyst Lowers Price Target on Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean
    Motley Fool

    Analyst Lowers Price Target on Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean

    The cruise ship industry is getting a major haircut from an analyst at investment firm SunTrust Robinson, who says we may not have seen the bottom of Carnival (NYSE: CCL), Norwegian Cruise Line (NYSE: NCLH), and Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL) shares. Analyst C. Patrick Scholes lowered his price target on Carnival 27% from $51 to $37, on Royal Caribbean 38% from $164 to $102, and on Norwegian Cruise Line 32% from $66 to $45.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. Announces Extension of Suspension of Voyages

    Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. (“Norwegian” or “the Company”) (NCLH), a leading global cruise company which operates the Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises brands, today announced an extension of its previously announced suspension of global cruise voyages to include voyages embarking between July 1 and July 31, 2020 for its three cruise brands. The voyage suspension contributes to global efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19.

  • Markets mixed ahead of Powell, Mnuchin testimony
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Markets mixed ahead of Powell, Mnuchin testimony

    Victoria Fernandez, Chief Market Strategist at Crossmark Global Investments, joins Yahoo Finance's Alexis Christoforous and Brian Sozzi to break down the latest earnings report, weigh in on the state of carnival and airlines stocks and discuss overall markets around Tuesday's opening bell.

  • America’s Zombie Companies Are Multiplying and Fueling New Risks
    Bloomberg

    America’s Zombie Companies Are Multiplying and Fueling New Risks

    (Bloomberg) -- As the Federal Reserve pulls out all the stops to bolster credit markets, corporate America is gorging on debt.From Carnival Corp., Marriott International Inc. and Delta Air Lines Inc. to Gap Inc. and Avis Budget Group Inc., many of the companies hardest hit by the coronavirus outbreak have priced billions of dollars of bonds and loans in recent weeks.Never mind that profits have been wiped out, and that their business operations aren’t viable right now or likely anytime soon. As long as they’re propped up by the Fed, investors are willing to lend.Yet as expectations of a V-shaped economic recovery vanish rapidly, more and more industry veterans are starting to express concern about these debt dynamics. Some warn that the Fed is putting credit markets on course for a future wave of defaults that makes the current stretch of corporate bankruptcies look timid by comparison.Others see an outcome even more dire.In this scenario, they say, moribund companies in industries deeply scarred by the pandemic will just keep borrowing. Market watchers such as Deutsche Bank AG chief economist Torsten Slok fear that a new breed of so-called zombie companies -- firms that don’t earn enough to cover interest payments and are kept alive in part by central bank largess -- could have profound and painful consequences for everyone from workers to investors for years to come.“The Fed and the government are interfering in the process of creative destruction,” Slok said in an interview. “The consequence is that we are at risk the longer this persists –- companies being kept alive that would otherwise have gone out of business -- that it will begin to weigh on the overall potential for growth of the economy and on productivity.”It’s not that these risks mean the Fed’s current policy tack is misguided. Given the scope of the economic collapse and the unprecedented spike in unemployment that has accompanied it, most analysts say policy makers had to throw everything they could at the problem. It’s just that such dramatic intervention comes with great risks that will have to be addressed down the road.“The Fed had no other choice than to do what it did,” Slok said.Still, it’s precisely this dramatic intervention that’s emboldening money managers to take greater chances and seek fatter returns.“You can’t say ‘we’ll do whatever it takes’ and not do it,” said Jack McIntyre, who helps oversee about $60 billion at Philadelphia-based Brandywine Global Investment Management. “Otherwise, the Fed will lose credibility.”McIntyre said he’s buying select investment-grade corporate bonds in lieu of Treasuries “because the Fed has backstopped the market -- if spreads widen, the Fed will step in.”That’s just the sort of sentiment that can ultimately lead to the proliferation of zombies, economists say.Fed BackstopThe actual definition of what makes a company a zombie varies depending on who you ask, but most agree that it’s generally meant to encompass firms that can’t cover their debt servicing costs from current profits over a select period.A snapshot of the market reveals no shortage of companies that would fit that description should the economic rebound take time to gain momentum.Earnings for companies, excluding financials, in the S&P 500 are forecast to drop a staggering 42% in the second quarter from the previous year as the full effect of global lockdowns are felt, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg.At the same time, net corporate debt issuance has ballooned, and could approach as much as $1 trillion this year, according to Bloomberg Intelligence.Delta and Marriott declined to comment, while Avis didn’t respond to requests seeking comment.Carnival referred Bloomberg to a press release highlighting the strength of its balance sheet and continued customer bookings for the second half of the year and 2021.A representative for Gap directed Bloomberg to a statement noting its financing and cash preservation efforts, adding that the company plans to have 800 stores open by the end of May.If the pace of the recovery is quick enough, corporate-bond buyers say plenty of hard-hit companies should be able to turn things around.But the question on the minds of investors and economists alike is: how long will the Fed be willing to support firms via its pledge to buy corporate debt if the recovery is slower to develop than expected?“The government has done more than I could have imagined to allow businesses to access capital, and if the markets shut down again the government will do even more,” said Bill Zox, chief investment officer of fixed income at Diamond Hill Capital Management, which manages around $19.5 billion.Borrowing BingeIt’s an especially salient question when it comes to the sectors hardest hit by the Covid-19 outbreak.Cruise lines have borrowed more than $8 billion via the bond market in recent weeks, selling notes secured by everything from ships to islands. Airlines, for their part, have gotten more than $14 billion in new financing from banks and investors, even as the vast majority of flights remain grounded.“We have entire industries that are going to be protracted long-term if not permanently disrupted because of this,” said Vicki Bryan, a veteran credit analyst who runs Bond Angle LLC. “The cruise industry is ripe for elimination of companies. It should logically renounce the weaker players but that’s not happening because we have dirt-cheap money that we’re willing to throw back into the market from the Fed.”Beyond just lending them money, creditors are also waiving or loosening financial markers on existing debt, allowing companies that have seen revenue dry up stave off potential tumult.Vail Resorts Inc. -- owner of the eponymous winter vacation destination -- was granted a two-year reprieve on key debt covenants last month, paving the way for the company to raise $600 million with a new bond offering. Marriott, one of the world’s largest hotel chains, struck a similar agreement with lenders.A representative for Vail said that the company’s bank covenant waiver provided additional flexibility given the short-term dislocation from Covid-19, and that it remains confident in the long-term outlook for both profit and cash flow.‘Catch-22’Yet amid the waivers, lenders are extracting higher interest rates or other concessions.Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd., AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc. and Avis all paid double-digit yields to borrow in recent weeks. That could depress their capacity to make capital expenditures and adapt to shifting consumer tastes as the coronavirus changes how people spend money.“Taken together with margin contraction and leverage that was already near record highs, you may end up with a corporate sector that has less capacity to invest in growth,” said Noel Hebert, director of credit research at Bloomberg Intelligence.Norwegian has a “long-standing track record of strong financial performance which includes over a decade of financial growth,” a company spokesperson said in an emailed response to questions. “The cruise industry has been hit the hardest by Covid-19 as our operations have been completely shut down, which certainly impacts us in the short-term but has no bearing on our long-term success.”AMC didn’t respond to requests seeking comment.Read more: Corporate debt loads are growing fast as Fed opens up spigotsSome say as successful as the Fed has been boosting credit-market liquidity, the support is only temporary, and will result in a wave of distress when it steps back.“There will be plenty” of debt defaults and bankruptcies when corporate borrowers start running out of cash in the months ahead, Howard Marks, co-chairman of Oaktree Capital Group, said in a Bloomberg TV interview. “There are large, highly levered companies and investment vehicles that the government and Fed rescue program is not likely to reach and take care of.”Others see central-bank intervention keeping companies alive for much longer, crowding out investment and employment at healthy firms, similar to what occurred in Japan during the nation’s ‘lost decade’ of the 1990s, where the ‘zombie company’ term was first applied.“You are misallocating capital to businesses that are not productive and in some sense taking resources away from companies that have high growth,” Deutsche Bank’s Slok said.The repercussions may only become apparent years from now, according to Marc Zenner, a former co-head of corporate finance advisory at JPMorgan Chase & Co.“It’s hard for me to think that something like that doesn’t have a cost,” Zenner said. “What you’ll see is some of these costs will probably only emerge years later. Are we going to have reduced capacity to act? Is it that other economies will be less burdened and will attract more capital? Is there another crisis that will come because of this misallocation of capital?”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • We could still see a V-Shaped recovery: Expert
    Yahoo Finance Video

    We could still see a V-Shaped recovery: Expert

    Head of Macro Strategy at Academy Securities Peter Tchir joins Yahoo Finance’s Seana Smith to break down his outlook on the markets as coronavirus cases surpass 1.5M in the U.S., according to John Hopkins.

  • Why Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean Were Soaring Monday Morning
    Motley Fool

    Why Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean Were Soaring Monday Morning

    Shares of cruise line operators Carnival (NYSE: CCL), Norwegian Cruise Line (NYSE: NCLH), and Royal Carribbean (NYSE: RCL) were all soaring by double-digit rates Monday morning. Carnival opened 11% higher today and Norwegian and Royal were up 15% each. A series of positive developments inspired hope among cruise ship investors that the worst may be behind the industry and they could extend their rally for a third consecutive trading day.

  • Why Did Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Plunge This Week?
    Motley Fool

    Why Did Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Plunge This Week?

    All three cruise line stocks moved lower as layoffs and problematic quarterly results offset improving liquidity snapshots.

  • Pinterest, Bank of America, Norwegian Cruise, Royal Caribbean and Carnival as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Pinterest, Bank of America, Norwegian Cruise, Royal Caribbean and Carnival as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Pinterest, Bank of America, Norwegian Cruise, Royal Caribbean and Carnival as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Will Norwegian Cruise Line Be a $26 Stock?
    Motley Fool

    Will Norwegian Cruise Line Be a $26 Stock?

    At least one Wall Street pro thinks the sell-off in Norwegian Cruise Line (NYSE: NCLH) stock has gone too far. James Hardiman, an analyst at Wedbush Securities recently attached a $26 per share price target on the battered cruise ship stock, which equates to more than a 100% return from the current level. The nightmare scenario of insolvency, meanwhile, is unlikely now that Norwegian has raised enough capital to potentially operate through 2021 without resuming its cruise services.

  • GlobeNewswire

    NCL Corporation Ltd. Announces Closing of $675,000,000 of Secured Notes

    NCL Corporation Ltd. (“NCLC”), a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. (NCLH), announced today that it closed its previously announced private offering of $675 million aggregate principal amount of its 12.25% senior secured notes due 2024 (the “Secured Notes”) on May 14, 2020. NCLC expects to use the net proceeds from the offering of the Secured Notes for general corporate purposes. The Secured Notes and certain of the related guarantees will be secured by first-priority interests in, among other things and subject to certain agreed security principles, shares of capital stock in certain subsidiary guarantors, two of our vessels, our material intellectual property and two islands that we use in the operations of our cruise business.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of NCLH earnings conference call or presentation 14-May-20 2:00pm GMT

    Q1 2020 Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd Earnings Call

  • Why Norwegian Cruise Line Stock Rose 4.4% Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Norwegian Cruise Line Stock Rose 4.4% Today

    The beleaguered cruise ship operator said it could survive another 18 months of coronavirus-related sailing restrictions.

  • Norwegian Cruise Lines, Royal Caribbean, and Carnival All Made Big Moves Today
    Motley Fool

    Norwegian Cruise Lines, Royal Caribbean, and Carnival All Made Big Moves Today

    Of all the high-risk, high-upside opportunities in the market today, none are perhaps as interesting as cruise line stocks Norwegian Cruise Lines (NYSE: NCLH), Royal Caribbean (NYSE: RCL), and Carnival (NYSE: CCL). Amid the coronavirus pandemic, all three cruise companies have ceased cruising and are burning cash with no end in sight. On the other hand, all have managed to raise money from the public debt and equity markets in order to tide them over for the intermediate term -- albeit expensively, with significant shareholder dilution.

  • More consumers show interest in traveling on cruises in the near term: Analyst
    Yahoo Finance Video

    More consumers show interest in traveling on cruises in the near term: Analyst

    Norwegian Cruise Line posted its first quarter earnings report on Thursday. Wedbush Securities Leisure & Travel Analyst James Hardiman joins Yahoo Finance’s On The Move to discuss Norwegian Cruise Line’s latest financial results and address the challenges the cruise industry may face post-pandemic.

  • Norwegian Cruise Line Preps for a Worst Case: 18 Months With No Revenue
    Skift

    Norwegian Cruise Line Preps for a Worst Case: 18 Months With No Revenue

    The pandemic is prompting chief executives across the globe to ponder all kinds of hypotheticals about the future performance of their businesses. Here's one laid out by Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings CEO Frank Del Rio on Thursday: 18 months without any revenue. Del Rio offered that worst case scenario during his company's first quarter earnings […]