MSFT - Microsoft Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
133.43
-4.35 (-3.16%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

133.45 +0.02 (0.01%)
After hours: 7:59PM EDT

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Previous Close137.78
Open137.25
Bid133.32 x 4000
Ask133.70 x 800
Day's Range132.73 - 137.58
52 Week Range93.96 - 138.40
Volume29,599,336
Avg. Volume23,511,539
Market Cap1.022T
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.05
PE Ratio (TTM)29.64
EPS (TTM)4.50
Earnings DateJul 17, 2019 - Jul 22, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield1.84 (1.34%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-14
1y Target Est143.16
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Microsoft debuts Personal Vault for OneDrive, offers more storage
    Yahoo Finance7 hours ago

    Microsoft debuts Personal Vault for OneDrive, offers more storage

    Microsoft has debuted a new feature called Personal Vault that adds an extra level of security to its OneDrive service.

  • DOD Tech Chief Prepares for `JEDI' Cloud Amid Court Battle
    Bloomberg2 hours ago

    DOD Tech Chief Prepares for `JEDI' Cloud Amid Court Battle

    (Bloomberg) -- The Pentagon is preparing for the rollout of its controversial cloud services program even though the requirements of the $10 billion contract are still being challenged in court by Oracle Corp.Dana Deasy, the Pentagon’s chief information officer, asked department leaders for recommendations about how they plan to use the contract and told them not to initiate any other cloud agreements without his consent, according to a copy of the memo obtained by Bloomberg News.Deasy sent the memo dated May 20 to a wide range of Pentagon officials outlining guidance for the “fourth estate” -- the Defense Department agencies that provide human resources, services contracting and other support services to the military -- to identify technology programs that could be transitioned to the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud, or JEDI, and to a preexisting cloud program called milCloud 2.0.The memo sheds insight on how the Defense Department is moving ahead with implementation of the JEDI cloud program even while a legal dispute raises questions about the contract’s terms. Asked whether the Pentagon’s choice for the JEDI award is contingent on a decision in the Oracle lawsuit, Deasy told a group of reporters at a breakfast on Tuesday that “they are two disconnected events.”He added that the JEDI award will likely be decided “sometime toward the end of August.”Deasy’s memo also said that departments that have already gained approval to migrate data to other computing storage centers may continue, but must “evaluate JEDI as the General Purpose cloud solution at the end of the period of performance.” The memo also contained a list of more than 50 expected data center closings. The Defense Department has said JEDI should become the department’s general-purpose cloud to store the “majority of systems and applications.Defense Department spokeswoman Elissa Smith confirmed the authenticity of the memo and added that the Air Force, Army, and Navy have also “begun identifying and prioritizing programs and migrations to JEDI.”Deasy said Tuesday that over the last six months his team has contacted U.S. regional commanders, such as the U.S. Central Command, for a series of “cloud-awareness sessions.”“There is a significant amount of pent-up demand just waiting to use the capability once it comes online,” Deasy said. The U.S. Transportation Command that’s in charge of maritime, aviation and land transport has developed a set of tasks they want to migrate to the Jedi Cloud “as soon as that contract is awarded.”Contested ContractThe contract has been contested by Oracle, which the Pentagon eliminated from the bidding in April along with International Business Machines Corp. for not meeting minimum criteria. That move left Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. as the last remaining competitors.Oracle filed a lawsuit in December in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims alleging that the Pentagon crafted overly narrow contract requirements and failed to investigate relationships between former Defense Department employees and Amazon. In May, Oracle filed an amended complaint alleging that Amazon offered two former Pentagon employees jobs while they were working on the contract.The Government Accountability Office and an internal Pentagon investigation determined the conflict of interest allegations didn’t compromise the integrity of the procurement. Oral arguments in the court case are expected to occur in July.(Adds that a lawsuit raises questions about the contract's terms in fourth paragrah. The full name of JEDI was corrected in a previous version of the story.)To contact the reporters on this story: Naomi Nix in Washington at nnix1@bloomberg.net;Tony Capaccio in Washington at acapaccio@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Baystreet4 hours ago

    Stocks Bruised Tuesday

    Equities in Toronto took body blows Tuesday, as resource and tech stocks teamed up to dampen investor ...

  • Stock Market News: AbbVie Bets Big; Can Microsoft Stay on Top?
    Motley Fool8 hours ago

    Stock Market News: AbbVie Bets Big; Can Microsoft Stay on Top?

    Stocks lost ground on Tuesday morning.

  • Investing.com9 hours ago

    Stocks - Wall Street Slides as Hopes Fade Fed Will Go for Big Rate Cut

    Investing.com - Stocks fell back Tuesday as investors became more certain the Federal Reserve will only enact a modest rate cut at its July meeting. In addition, unease grew about the prospects for a meeting between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping

  • These Jobs Are, Like, So L.A.
    Bloomberg10 hours ago

    These Jobs Are, Like, So L.A.

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What do people do for a living in the New York-Newark-Jersey City metropolitan area? If you rank the sectors with the most jobs, it’s health care, retail, leisure and hospitality — which rank near the top almost everywhere. A more revealing way to sort things is by employment location quotient, which is provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of its Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages data and measures how much more prevalent an industry is in one area than in the nation as a whole. These are, in effect, the New Yorkiest industries:The list goes to 19 because when it went to 20 I got warning messages from Bloomberg’s in-house charting app that the graphic was too big. Which made me sad, because the next two “industries” in the ranking were the oh-so-New Yorky theater companies and art dealers. These are all what are known as four-, five- and six-digit industries under the North American Industry Classification System, meaning not broad sectors but narrow and sometimes very narrow ones. I weeded out overlap, so there should be no double-counting of jobs in the above numbers. Someone who really cared about about design and readability wouldn’t try to squeeze so much into one table, I know, but I was more interested in the gloriously true-to-cliché but also quite informative picture of the New York-area economy that such a long list provides.Related: Where Microbrewery Jobs Are OverflowingFinancial Jobs Aren’t Just in New YorkA Booming Local Health-Care Industry Isn’t Always a Good Thing The Internet Is Everywhere, But Internet Jobs Aren’tThere’s journalism, represented by the two parts that I’ve been working in since coming to New York in 1996 (news syndicates and periodical publishers), and its relatives in advertising and public relations. There’s high finance. There’s fashion. There’s books. There’s music (that’s the kind of record production they’re talking about). There’s performing arts. There’s fashion. There’s the diamond guys. There’s the newsstands. There’s the photo-equipment stores, or at least the photo-equipment wholesalers. And there’s … libraries and archives, for which the best explanation seems to be that the New York Public Library is a private nonprofit that gets funding from the city, meaning that its employees are almost certainly included in the by-industry data (which excludes government workers) while public library workers in most cities are not.Here’s the same exercise for the nation’s second-largest metropolitan area, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim. It delivers on the clichés as well, with agents — of course! — coming in first place.Just missing the cut here was “other aircraft parts and equipment,” a remnant of an industry that used to be a very big deal in the Los Angeles area but has been decimated since the early 1990s.(2) Overall the list is a mix of well-paid entertainment industry work and grittier, less-well-remunerated manufacturing and wholesaling jobs (although pay is pretty good in doll, toy and game manufacturing, thanks to the presence of industry leader Mattel Inc.’s headquarters in El Segundo). This preponderance of blue-collar industries won’t come as a surprise to people in the Los Angeles area — which is also home to the country’s two busiest ports, among other things — but it doesn’t exactly accord with the area’s global image. Oh, and the high location quotient for HMO (short for health management organization) medical centers is a California-wide thing: Kaiser Permanente, an Oakland-based nonprofit HMO(3) that runs its own network of hospitals, has a 50% share of the state’s health insurance market. Here are the top-location-quotient industries in the nation’s third-largest metropolitan area, Chicago-Naperville-Elgin:They still make a lot of stuff in and around Chicago! Manufacturing employment in the area is not what it used to be, with a 39% decline since 1990 compared with 27% nationwide, but it’s been mostly rising since 2010. There are also signs here of Chicago’s role as a mid-American economic hub: the commodities markets, the professional organizations, the credit bureaus. There’s not much sign of likely growth industries of the future, though — and to some extent, that’s true of all three of the biggest metro areas.One can make these lists for every U.S. metropolitan area, and even every county, using the BLS’s QCEW data viewer. The agency suppresses local industry data when it might reveal details about individual employers, so smaller areas will often deliver less accurate rankings. Still, it’s a wonderful way to explore the nation’s far-from-uniform economic geography, as I’ve been doing in my columns for the past few days. And I really should stop there, but as I was looking through a few other metro areas’ most distinctive industries, I came across this great top 10 for Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue: One can find all the Seattle area’s iconic modern corporations reflected here: aircraft manufacturer Boeing Co. (which moved its corporate headquarters but not much else to Chicago in 2001), software giant Microsoft Corp., “electronic shopping and mail-order house” Amazon.com Inc., coffee juggernaut Starbucks Corp.(4)  But signs of the area’s past are apparent, too, in the form of fishing, seafood packaging, the port — and the by-now-totally-retro monorail. Local economic data can tell some very interesting stories.(1) Worse than decimated, actually. Employment in transportation equipment manufacturing in the Los Angeles area is down 65% since 1990.(2) The preferred term for what Kaiser does now seems to be integrated managed care consortium, but the acronym IMCC hasn't really caught on.(3) Starbucks headquarters employees do not appear to be included in the tally for coffee and tea manufacturing, but workers at its "flexible roasting plant" in the Seattle suburb of Kent probably are.To contact the author of this story: Justin Fox at justinfox@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brooke Sample at bsample1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Justin Fox is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He was the editorial director of Harvard Business Review and wrote for Time, Fortune and American Banker. He is the author of “The Myth of the Rational Market.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com10 hours ago

    Microsoft Stock Will Plunge, Analyst Says

    Jefferies’ John DiFucci kept his Underperform rating on the shares, citing high valuations and growing competition from Amazon.

  • Zacks.com featured highlights include: LPL, Intuit, Cadence and Microsoft
    Zacks12 hours ago

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: LPL, Intuit, Cadence and Microsoft

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: LPL, Intuit, Cadence and Microsoft

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Chevron, Cisco, Merck and Visa
    Zacks12 hours ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Chevron, Cisco, Merck and Visa

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Chevron, Cisco, Merck and Visa

  • Capgemini Buys Altran for $4.1 Billion to Expand in Tech
    Bloomberg17 hours ago

    Capgemini Buys Altran for $4.1 Billion to Expand in Tech

    (Bloomberg) -- Capgemini SE said it will acquire Altran Technologies SA in a 3.6 billion-euro ($4.1 billion) deal in order to win more tech clients and keep up with rivals.Paris-based Capgemini is looking to maintain its position as a major IT consultancy in a consolidating industry, as competitors such as Accenture have been building out their sales from digital projects.Capgemini’s shares rose as much as 8% in early morning trading in Paris Tuesday, the most since October 2011. Altran rose 21% to 13.9 euros, trading just below the 14 euros-a-share offer price.Analysts broadly backed the deal. "We think this deal should bring strong value creation and provides scale that can help Capgemini close the valuation gap to larger rivals such as Accenture," said Neil Campling, analyst at Mirabaud.The 14 euros-a-share cash portion of the deal amounts to 3.6 billion euros excluding net debt of 1.4 billion euros, the companies said in a statement Monday. The offer is a 22% premium to Altran’s closing price on Friday.The proposal is a “positive step, as it looks to significantly expand into R&D and engineering, two areas becoming main growth drivers for IT-outsourcing companies,” said Anurag Rana, a Bloomberg Intelligence analyst. “The deal would enable Capgemini to compete more aggressively with Accenture, which generates more than 60% of sales from digital projects.”When combined Capgemini and Altran -- also based in Paris -- will be able to help clients in areas such as cloud computing, the internet of things, 5G, and artificial intelligence software, Capgemini Chief Executive Officer Paul Hermelin said in a statement.In an interview with Bloomberg TV, Hermelin added that Altran adds "beautiful accounts" such as Intel Corp, Cisco Systems Inc. and Microsoft Corp., but added that the group still needed to develop its business in Asia. The combination of the two companies will result in a group with 17 billion euros in annual revenue and more than 250,000 employees.Hermelin expressed confidence on a conference call Monday that there are no antitrust issues associated with the takeover since “the market is very fragmented.”Still, the companies’ businesses do overlap, as they provide some of the same services to similar industries. Capgemini expects the deal to boost earnings per share by 25% by 2023, from 15% before the transition is completed.(Updated with CEO interview.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.net;Francois de Beaupuy in Paris at fdebeaupuy@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Molly Schuetz, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Microsoft (MSFT) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
    Zacks2 days ago

    Microsoft (MSFT) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    Microsoft (MSFT) closed at $137.77 in the latest trading session, marking a +0.58% move from the prior day.

  • Barrons.com2 days ago

    Microsoft Has Dethroned Apple at the Top of the Russell 1000

    Microsoft’s total market cap of $974.2 billion makes it the new king of the Russell 1000, leapfrogging Apple, Alphabet and Amazon.com. Apple had held the top slot since 2012.

  • Is This Supplier for Ford, Tencent, Baidu, and MSFT Going Public?
    Market Realist2 days ago

    Is This Supplier for Ford, Tencent, Baidu, and MSFT Going Public?

    Velodyne LiDAR seems to be preparing for its IPO. The company “has hired bankers for an initial public offering,” Reuters said. According to the report, Velodyne LiDAR has chosen Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Canada, and William Blair to work on its potential exchange listing.

  • Investing.com2 days ago

    Stocks - Market Flat Ahead of G20 Meeting

    Investing.com - Stocks basically stood still on Monday after a weekend of worry about global economic concerns and relief, perhaps, the United States didn't attack Iran over the downing of a spy drone last week.

  • 4 GARP Stocks to Scoop Up for Maximum Returns
    Zacks2 days ago

    4 GARP Stocks to Scoop Up for Maximum Returns

    If you're looking for a profitable portfolio of stocks that will offer the best of value and growth investing, try the growth at a reasonable price or GARP strategy.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Cisco, Twitter, Akamai and Cadence Design
    Zacks2 days ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Cisco, Twitter, Akamai and Cadence Design

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Cisco, Twitter, Akamai and Cadence Design

  • Bloomberg2 days ago

    Google to Spend $1.1 Billion on New Data Centers in Netherlands

    (Bloomberg) -- Alphabet Inc.’s Google said it would invest 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) to expand its data center infrastructure in the Netherlands.A new facility will be built in Agriport, about 30 miles north of Amsterdam, while an existing site about 130 miles further north, in Eemshaven, will be expanded.In a statement Monday, Joe Kava, vice president of Google’s Global Data Centers, noted that the Netherlands was attractive for its "ample sustainable energy sources."Tech companies are choosing to locate their data centers in regions of the world with access to renewable power, reducing their reliance on fossil fuels. Rich wind and hydroelectric resources, as well as cooler climates that help save on air conditioning, make places like the Netherlands prime destinations. Facebook Inc. has a facility in Lulea, northern Sweden, and Microsoft Corp.’s data center in the Netherlands is a regional hub for its cloud computing services.Google didn’t specify what its new facilities would be used for.In 2018, the search giant announced it had invested 1.5 billion euros into its Netherlands data center operations. The expansions announced Monday bring that total to 2.5 billion euros, it said.To contact the reporter on this story: Nate Lanxon in London at nlanxon@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Peter ChapmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow on Pace for Best June: 5 Blue Chip Stocks to Buy
    Zacks2 days ago

    Dow on Pace for Best June: 5 Blue Chip Stocks to Buy

    Dow eyes best June in 80 years as investors cheer the Fed's shift to a more dovish stance.

  • Investing.com4 days ago

    3 Things Under the Radar This Week

    Investing.com - Here’s a look at three things that were under the radar this past week.

  • Bloomberg5 days ago

    Oracle Women Fight for Class-Action Status in Gender Pay Lawsuit

    (Bloomberg) -- Call it the class ceiling.Women suing major technology companies for gender discrimination would have much stronger leverage against their employers if they could press their claims on behalf of a large group of female colleagues. But last year, the first two cases to reach that critical juncture -- against Microsoft Corp. and Twitter Inc. -- failed to advance as class actions.Now three women at Oracle Corp. are trying to persuade a state court to let them represent more than 4,000 peers in a case claiming that the database giant pays men better for doing the same jobs, in violation of California’s Equal Pay Act. They were to make their case Friday, but the judge postponed it to September after a brief hearing.It won’t be easy because the U.S. Supreme Court set a high bar for employment discrimination cases to win class-action status in a 2011 decision that blocked 1.5 million female workers at Walmart Inc. from pursuing their gender-bias claims as a group. The barriers imposed by the high court played into the Twitter and Microsoft rulings, both of which are being appealed.The case against Oracle was filed by former company engineer Sue Petersen and two other women, all of whom worked at PeopleSoft Corp. before it was acquired by Oracle in 2005.The women allege that Oracle for years has paid women less than men for “substantially similar work, when viewed as a composite of skill, effort, and responsibility, and performed under similar working conditions.” To bolster their bid for class-action status, the plaintiffs emphasize that company-wide compensation is determined at Oracle’s headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.Wrong ComparisonOracle contends the lawsuit wrongly compares women and men tagged with the same job codes even though such coding doesn’t mean the work requires similar skills, effort or responsibility, because Oracle’s products and services vary so widely.Relying on the codes doesn’t “account for the tools or programming languages an employee must master, the hours her work requires, or the number and complexity of the sub-areas of a product for which she is responsible,” the company said in a court filing.Dorian Daley, Oracle executive vice president and general counsel, said in an emailed statement that the lawsuit was “meritless,” based on false allegations and relies “on cherry picked statistics rather than reality. We fiercely disagree with the spurious claims and will continue in the process to prove them false. We are in compliance with our regulatory obligations, committed to equality, and proud of our employees.”Oracle is also fighting a case over gender-pay disparities brought by the U.S. Labor Department in the waning days of the Obama administration.The case is Jewett v. Oracle America Inc., 17-CIV-02669, California Superior Court, County of San Mateo (Redwood City).(Updates with Oracle statement.)\--With assistance from Nico Grant and Robert Burnson.To contact the reporters on this story: Peter Blumberg in San Francisco at pblumberg1@bloomberg.net;Joel Rosenblatt in San Francisco at jrosenblatt@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Steve Stroth, Joe SchneiderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Do You Like Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) At This P/E Ratio?
    Simply Wall St.5 days ago

    Do You Like Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) At This P/E Ratio?

    This article is written for those who want to get better at using price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll show...

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, Spotify, Microsoft, Cisco and Facebook
    Zacks5 days ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, Spotify, Microsoft, Cisco and Facebook

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, Spotify, Microsoft, Cisco and Facebook

  • General Mills, Douglas Dynamics, CDW, Applied Materials and Microsoft highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks5 days ago

    General Mills, Douglas Dynamics, CDW, Applied Materials and Microsoft highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    General Mills, Douglas Dynamics, CDW, Applied Materials and Microsoft highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Norway's $1T Money Manager to Ditch Oil Stocks: Here's Why
    Zacks5 days ago

    Norway's $1T Money Manager to Ditch Oil Stocks: Here's Why

    Norway's $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund maintained that the decision was prompted by financial considerations and is not an ethical drive.