IVR - Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
2.8800
+0.1100 (+3.97%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

2.9300 +0.05 (1.74%)
Pre-Market: 8:22AM EDT

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Previous Close2.7700
Open2.7600
Bid2.9200 x 34100
Ask2.9300 x 21500
Day's Range2.7000 - 2.9100
52 Week Range1.8200 - 18.3000
Volume9,892,207
Avg. Volume12,207,604
Market Cap475.102M
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.41
PE Ratio (TTM)1.19
EPS (TTM)2.4160
Earnings DateJun. 15, 2020 - Jun. 25, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.00 (69.44%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 20, 2020
1y Target Est1.96
  • Does Market Volatility Impact Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc.'s (NYSE:IVR) Share Price?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Market Volatility Impact Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc.'s (NYSE:IVR) Share Price?

    If you own shares in Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes to the...

  • Business Wire

    NOTICE TO INVESCO MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC. (IVR) INVESTORS – KlaymanToskes commences investigation on behalf of IVR Investors Who Sustained Losses in Excess of $100,000 as a Result of a Recommendation from their Financial Advisor

    KlaymanToskes ("KT"), http://www.klaymantoskes.com, announces an investigation on behalf of investors who sustained losses from the purchase of Invesco Mortgage Trust, Inc. (NYSE:IVR) ("IVR") a Real Estate Investment Trust ("REIT"). IVR closed at 18.23 on February 21, 2020, prior to the significant market event that was precipitated by COVID-19. Today, IVR trades at 3.63, or more than 80% lower than its market value on February 21, 2020. This product may have been marketed and sold to investors who were risk averse, such as retirees or other conservative investors, that were seeking income and capital preservation and were not explained the potential risks.

  • A Rent Wipeout Could Ignite a Mortgage Crisis
    Bloomberg

    A Rent Wipeout Could Ignite a Mortgage Crisis

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The rent is too high. And that’s causing consternation across Wall Street desks still traumatized by the 2008 financial crisis.As the days go by in an unprecedented shutdown of the U.S. economy to slow the coronavirus outbreak, any amount of rent looks increasingly difficult to cover for a wide swath of Americans, from recently fired service workers to local small-business owners. Unfortunately for those most affected, these payments can’t simply be wiped out — at least, not without dire repercussions. My Bloomberg Opinion colleague Noah Smith wrote a column this week arguing that people need a break on all sorts of debts. But when it comes to rent, there’s pretty much no way around people eventually paying what they owe, ideally with the help of the U.S. government, or else risk “turning a health crisis into a banking crisis.”This, more or less, is the catastrophic “domino effect” that real-estate investor Tom Barrack, chief executive officer of Colony Capital Inc., warned about this week. Simply put, if commercial tenants don’t pay rent because of a lack of cash, then property owners might be squeezed and default on their mortgage payments. The same goes for homeowners. That could bring the problem squarely onto the balance sheets of large U.S. banks, which will suffer steep losses on their loans.At first, it might have seemed as if Barrack was simply talking his book. But as more details emerged about the carnage across the $16 trillion U.S. mortgage market, it’s clear that the complex web of financial obligations tied to real estate could again be the flashpoint that leads to a financial crisis without some sort of intervention.Part of the reason that mortgages are again veering into crisis mode is because the modern market has so many moving parts. My Bloomberg Opinion colleague Matt Levine laid it out in a five-part list, which you can (and should) read here. Suffice it to say, if money is being lent twice-over in the repo market, the players are highly leveraged and vulnerable to an unexpected shock. The coronavirus outbreak certainly qualifies as such — some 47,000 U.S. chain stores temporary closed in the span of a week, Bloomberg News reported Tuesday. The median estimate for initial jobless claims on Thursday is 1.5 million, up from 281,000 previously.This mortgage-market meltdown is happening largely because everyone in the money chain is anxious and wants to cash out at the same time. But it also comes back to rent. It’s anyone’s guess when the American economy will be up and running again and what sort of assistance the federal government will provide to those companies forced to close and those individuals suddenly out of a job. It’s hard to blame banks for not wanting to wait around for answers and instead issue margin calls on mortgage real estate investment trusts.Those jitters caused emergency sales from the REITs, including relatively safe (and more liquid) agency debt. But that can’t last forever. On Tuesday, Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. said it could longer fund margin calls, following in the footsteps of AG Mortgage Investment Trust Inc., which said it failed to meet some margin calls on Friday and doesn’t expect to meet them in the future, and TPG RE Finance Trust Inc., which is seeking flexibility from lenders. They’re almost certainly not the only ones.For now, there’s only so much the Federal Reserve can do to address these strains. It announced open-ended purchases of both U.S. Treasuries and agency mortgage-backed securities on Monday. The central bank is wasting no time flexing its muscle: It’s targeting $250 billion of agency MBS purchases this week after buying $67 billion last week. The previous record was $33 billion in March 2009, according to Morgan Stanley. Many observers are confident that the Fed’s “whatever it takes” model will restore order to the agency MBS market in no time.For non-agency securities, there’s not yet a dedicated lifeline. My Bloomberg Opinion colleague Marcus Ashworth suggests these assets may be the next order of business for the Fed. It’s hard to argue with that, given the central bank’s already unprecedented moves into the corporate and municipal markets.Before the Fed launches yet another emergency facility, though, central bankers should assess the fiscal stimulus package from Congress. If lawmakers provide enough relief for the most affected Americans to get through these next few months and cover their rent, lease and mortgage payments, it might be enough to prevent the first domino from falling in Barrack’s example.The coronavirus outbreak has suddenly halted cash flows of all kinds. Washington needs to keep the spigot open.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brian Chappatta is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering debt markets. He previously covered bonds for Bloomberg News. He is also a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Real Estate Billionaire Is Right to Sound the Mortgage Alarm

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The U.S. commercial real estate sector could be the next shoe to drop for the Federal Reserve; it may need some emergency triage. There were $3.66 trillion of commercial mortgage-backed securities outstanding at the end of 2019, more than one-fifth of the overall U.S. mortgage securities market. And the signs of distress are appearing.Real estate investor Tom Barrack has issued dire warnings of a “domino effect” of margin calls, cross defaults and other related debt failures if financing in the sector dries up. To prove his fears might be well placed, Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc., a real estate investment trust, said on Tuesday that it can’t make its margin calls (demands for extra capital or securities that kick in when asset prices fall). It won’t be alone.The coronavirus-inflicted crisis of confidence is also afflicting the primary market for commercial property debt as deals slated for sale aren’t being completed. A syndicate of banks led by Citigroup Inc. — and including Deutsche Bank AG, Barclays Plc and Societe Generale — has been left holding billions of dollars of debt on a Las Vegas casino deal, involving currently shuttered MGM Grand and Mandalay Bay properties, according to Bloomberg News.This won’t be the last project that debt investors back away from, leaving the underwriting banks exposed. And unfortunately, this isn’t just about large, well-capitalized banks being overgenerous in financing risky projects. This could become a systemic problem if risk appetite is pared to the bone. If things keep heading in this direction, the world’s other central banks will be looking to take their lead from how the Fed’s prepared to respond. The commercial property market is under severe strain internationally because of the Covid-19 enforced shutdowns of retail and leisure businesses.That said, the commercial mortgage-backed security market is considerably larger in the U.S. than elsewhere, and has a much wider variety of credit quality. In Europe, there are measures in place to manage the fallout from similar asset-backed securities, although commercial mortgage-backed stuff is rarer there. The European Central Bank doesn’t buy the latter, but it has already purchased more than 30 billion euros ($33 billion) of investment grade asset-backed securities in an ongoing program.A crisis in commercial property could force the Fed and other central banks to ease up on a lot of accounting regulations, maybe by not making lenders mark assets to market prices and allowing more forbearance on loans. It might even require the Fed and the U.S. Treasury to build further on its bailout template from the last financial crisis and restart the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) to buy toxic assets directly. It used the Public-Private Investment Program (P-PIP), unveiled back in March 2009, to buy legacy loans and securities.This time around, the U.S. has already restarted the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF), but that doesn’t include non-public distressed real-estate assets and commercial property derivatives. The Fed has fired several bazookas in response to the virus crisis, including unlimited Quantitative Easing for Treasury bonds and residential mortgage-backed debt. It’s even buying investment-grade corporate bonds, to the despair of some. But it won’t end there. The wider risk now is how commercial real estate copes if the banking system gums up its access to financing.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Marcus Ashworth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering European markets. He spent three decades in the banking industry, most recently as chief markets strategist at Haitong Securities in London.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of IVR earnings conference call or presentation 20-Feb-20 2:00pm GMT

    Q4 2019 Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc Earnings Call

  • Have Insiders Been Buying Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR) Shares This Year?
    Simply Wall St.

    Have Insiders Been Buying Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR) Shares This Year?

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. The flip side of that is...

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of IVR earnings conference call or presentation 8-Nov-19 2:00pm GMT

    Q3 2019 Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc Earnings Call

  • Invesco Mortgage Capital (NYSE:IVR) Shareholders Have Enjoyed A 11% Share Price Gain
    Simply Wall St.

    Invesco Mortgage Capital (NYSE:IVR) Shareholders Have Enjoyed A 11% Share Price Gain

    Buying a low-cost index fund will get you the average market return. But across the board there are plenty of stocks...

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of IVR earnings conference call or presentation 8-Aug-19 1:00pm GMT

    Q2 2019 Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc Earnings Call

  • Is There Now An Opportunity In Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is There Now An Opportunity In Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR)?

    Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR), which is in the mortgage reits business, and is based in United States...

  • Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc (IVR) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc (IVR) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

    IVR earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

  • Do Institutions Own Shares In Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Do Institutions Own Shares In Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR)?

    Every investor in Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc. (NYSE:IVR) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups...

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of IVR earnings conference call or presentation 9-May-19 1:00pm GMT

    Q1 2019 Invesco Mortgage Capital Inc Earnings Call