GOOGL - Alphabet Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
1,520.86
+8.63 (+0.57%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close1,512.23
Open1,492.79
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 1200
Day's Range1,485.93 - 1,522.80
52 Week Range1,008.87 - 1,576.36
Volume1,905,400
Avg. Volume2,051,276
Market Cap1.038T
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.06
PE Ratio (TTM)30.68
EPS (TTM)49.57
Earnings DateJul. 30, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est1,550.93
  • Brief's mobile news app aims to tackle information overload and media bias
    TechCrunch

    Brief's mobile news app aims to tackle information overload and media bias

    Founded by former Google engineers, Brief is a newly launched news app that aggregates and summarizes the news in hopes of tackling a number of problems with today’s news cycle, including information overload, burnout, media bias, and algorithms that prioritize engagement over news accuracy. Before Brief, co-founder and CEO Nick Hobbs was a Google product manager who had worked on AR, Google Assistant, Google's mobile app, and self-driving cars, among other things during his time at the company. Co-founder and CTO Andrea Huey, meanwhile, was a Google senior software engineer.

  • Google Cloud launches Assured Workloads for Government, its version of a government cloud
    TechCrunch

    Google Cloud launches Assured Workloads for Government, its version of a government cloud

    Google Cloud today announced the private beta launch of Assured Workloads for Government, the company's version of what some of its competitors would call their "government cloud." With Assured Workloads for Government, Google Cloud ensures that government agencies and their contractors can ensure that all data stays in its U.S. regions. Government agencies can also limit access to Google Cloud support personnel based on their citizenship, background check and geography.

  • Google Is in Advanced Talks to Invest $4 Billion in Jio Platforms
    Bloomberg

    Google Is in Advanced Talks to Invest $4 Billion in Jio Platforms

    (Bloomberg) -- Google is in advanced talks to buy a $4 billion stake in Indian billionaire Mukesh Ambani’s technology venture, people familiar with the matter said, seeking to join rival Facebook Inc. in chasing growth in a promising internet and e-commerce market.The Mountain View, California-based company has been discussing the investment in Jio Platforms Ltd., the digital arm of Ambani’s Reliance Industries Ltd., the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private. An announcement could come as soon as the next few weeks, according to the people.Jio is at the center of the Indian tycoon’s ambition to transform his energy conglomerate into a homegrown technology behemoth akin to China’s Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. The venture has turned into a magnet for Silicon Valley investors, attracting almost $16 billion from Facebook to KKR & Co. in the past three months.Should the talks with Google result in a deal, that would further burnish Jio’s credentials in its push to upend online retail, content streaming, digital payments, education and health care in a market of more than a billion people.Global technology leaders from Facebook to Intel Corp. are looking for multiple ways to grab a slice of the Indian market, where millions of first-time internet users are added every month. Jio Platforms, which boasts almost 400 million customers through its wireless network, offers the largest base of such users who are increasingly buying consumer goods online and downloading music and video, using cheap smartphones and Jio’s own cut-price data services.Trade war politics have all but eliminated Google’s odds of returning to China. That leaves India as one of the remaining large digital markets where Google’s key business lines, Search and YouTube, have room to grow. It’s also a country where Google has made headway in more nascent efforts, such as payments and health care.Chetan Sharma, a tech industry consultant, said cloud-computing is the main reason Google is investing in Jio. The move would also support Google’s Android smartphone operating system and its mobile payments efforts in the country, he added.Telecom giants are turning to cloud-computing for their next wave of expansion. As a provider, Google has lagged behind competitors in this growing sector, Sharma said. “Google has been more reactive than proactive,” he said. “This gives them a leg in.”Last year, Reliance entered a 10-year deal with Microsoft Corp. for cloud services. The announcement did not describe the partnership as exclusive, and Google’s cloud strategy has centered on offering businesses ways to spend across multiple providers.Read more: Facebook Helps Asia’s Richest Man Shed Dependence on OilAn arm of Qualcomm Inc. is the latest in Jio’s growing list of high-profile investors, which also includes Intel Capital, Silver Lake Partners and Mubadala Investment Co. As of July 12, Reliance had sold 25.2% of Jio, valuing the venture at $65 billion.Google invests widely in companies, through its venture capital units as well as off its own balance sheet. A $4 billion investment would be the largest Google has made in a company outside of the U.S.Here’s a list of confirmed investors in Jio Platforms:Details of the potential deal with Google could change, and negotiations could still be delayed or fall apart, the people said. Reliance’s representatives didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. A spokeswoman for Google in California declined to comment on Tuesday.The string of investments in Jio has spurred a rally in the shares of parent Reliance. The stock has more than doubled from its March 23 low, rewarding investors who will get to hear Ambani, 63, lay out his road map for the future of the group at the conglomerate’s annual shareholders meeting on Wednesday.The stock surge has also helped Ambani, Asia’s richest man, to break into the exclusive club of the world’s 10 wealthiest people. With a net worth of $72.4 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, the titan has rocketed past Elon Musk, Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, as well as legendary investor Warren Buffett in the past few days to become sixth on the list.Just like Facebook, Google is expanding its presence in the Indian market. On Monday, the company said it plans to spend $10 billion over the next five to seven years to help accelerate the adoption of digital technologies in the country. The amount could be put into partnerships and equity investments among others, it said.Sundar Pichai, who was born in the country and is now chief executive officer of Google parent Alphabet Inc., said the coronavirus outbreak has made clear the importance of technology for conducting business and connecting with friends and family.Founded in 1998 in Silicon Valley, Google entered India six years later with offices in Bangalore and Hyderabad. The India business has since grown into one of the company’s most important. The country now has more than 500 million internet users, second only to China, with growth that has proved a lure to a raft of American technology giants.In the last decade, Google has successfully launched several products in India, including an Internet Saathi service to bring women in rural areas online and its Google Pay service.(Updates with Google strategy in sixth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google faces lawsuit over tracking in apps even when users opted out
    Reuters

    Google faces lawsuit over tracking in apps even when users opted out

    Alphabet Inc's <GOOGL.O> Google records what people are doing on hundreds of thousands of mobile apps even when they follow the company's recommended settings for stopping such monitoring, a lawsuit seeking class action status alleged on Tuesday. The data privacy lawsuit is the second filed in as many months against Google by the law firm Boies Schiller Flexner on behalf a handful of individual consumers. The firm's clients also have included Google competitors such as Facebook Inc <FB.O> and Oracle Corp <ORCL.N>.

  • Google hit with 600,000 euro Belgian privacy fine
    Reuters

    Google hit with 600,000 euro Belgian privacy fine

    Google has received a record fine from Belgium's data protection authority (APD) of 600,000 euros for not complying with European rules on a person's "right to be forgotten" online. Google <GOOGL.O> failed to remove links from its search results to articles which APD said were "obsolete" and damaging to the reputation of a person with a public profile in Belgium. Google was "negligent" in deciding not to remove the links, given that the company had evidence that the facts were irrelevant and out of date, APD said.

  • Value Stocks’ Advantage Is Probably Short-Lived
    Bloomberg

    Value Stocks’ Advantage Is Probably Short-Lived

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Legendary investor Bill Miller, this week's guest on Masters in Business, is anything but your standard-issue value-stock money manager. He has owned high-flying stocks such as (Google parent) Alphabet and Amazon since their initial public offerings. At one time, he was one of the 100 biggest holders in Bitcoin, personally, buying the cryptocurrency between $200 and $400 (it recently traded at about $9,200). He has not yet sold any.Miller says that “value has led markets out of every recession as far back as the data goes.” That is because value stocks tend to be more cyclical and their returns on capital decline when the economy peaks. Whatever advantage value may have had will be short -ived, as growth will reassert itself.  Low nominal growth rates and low inflation are much more challenging for value stocks and make growth stocks look cheap.Miller rebooted his investing philosophy after the 1987 stock-market crash and his fund’s terrible market returns in 1989 and 1990. He began integrating academic research that had showed a benefit of focusing on return on capital through a market cycle. Instead of the using traditional measures embodied in generally accepted account principles, he focused on free cash flow yield, return on invested capital and full-cycle earnings.The result of these changes was the fund he was managing, Legg Mason’s Capital Management Value Trust, soon went on an unprecedented winning streak: after-fees returns beat the S&P 500 Index for 15 consecutive years from 1991 through 2005.Today, his firm, Miller Value Partners, manages more than $2 billion in client assets.A list of his favorite books are here; a transcript of our conversation is here.You can stream and download our full conversation, including the podcast extras on iTunes, Spotify, Overcast, Google, Bloomberg and Stitcher. All of our earlier podcasts on your favorite pod hosts can be found here.Be sure to check out our Masters in Business next week with Martin Franklin of Mariposa Capital. Franklin is credited with successfully reviving the use of special purpose acquisition companies, or so-called blank-check companies, as public vehicles for mergers and acquisitions with closely held companies.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is chairman and chief investment officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management, and was previously chief market strategist at Maxim Group. He is the author of “Bailout Nation.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google to Ban Tracking Technology Ads, Boost Data Privacy
    Zacks

    Google to Ban Tracking Technology Ads, Boost Data Privacy

    Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google to change its policy in a bid to restrict advertising for unauthorised tracking technology like spyware.

  • Baystreet

    Stocks Flat at Tuesday Open

    Canada's main stock index was virtually unchanged soon after the open on Tuesday, as energy shares fell ...

  • Google Has a New Solution to Win More Government Cloud Contracts
    Bloomberg

    Google Has a New Solution to Win More Government Cloud Contracts

    (Bloomberg) -- Google released a slate of new cloud-computing products on Tuesday, including an unorthodox approach to securing lucrative public sector deals.That particular service, called Assured Workloads for Governments, is designed to meet government security and compliance requirements with mostly software rather than a specialized data center.U.S. agencies, such as the Defense Department, are shifting billions of dollars in information technology spending to the cloud. But Alphabet Inc.’s Google has largely sat those deals out, as the company lacked key credentials and sales operations, and faced resistance from some of its employees.Yet Google is now intent on competing. The company’s cloud division improved its government security clearance last year and has hired several executives with experience selling to the public sector. The latest feature is the first from the company's cloud service tailored specifically for government buyers.To date, many major government cloud deals involve setting up special data centers to keep sensitive information physically separate from other clients’ data. Google deemed that model unnecessary, said Jeanette Manfra, who joined Google recently from the Department of Homeland Security.“Our approach is to make the entire commercial cloud a secure and protected one that works for the public sector,” Manfra, director of global security and compliance for Google Cloud, said.With Assured Workloads, customers can pick the region of the country where their data is stored and can limit which Google customer support staff they work with, through background checks or based on citizenship, Google said. It is releasing the new service this fall in the U.S. and expects to expand to other markets.Google failed to renew a contract with the Pentagon in 2018 after employee protests. That prompted criticism from U.S. politicians and military officials. Since then, Google has tried to mend ties. The company pursued one option to meet growing public sector security demands with a solution involving physically isolated data centers. The company closed that effort earlier this year, Bloomberg News reported.It’s new solution was announced along with a handful of other security-focused products as part of Google’s Next cloud conference. A continued focus for the third-placed cloud provider is its “multi-cloud” offering that lets customers more easily store data and run applications through a variety of providers.That approach could help it in the public sector, where it’s becoming a more attractive strategy. The Central Intelligence Agency is planning to hire multiple cloud providers in a new program that will give rivals a chance to take on market leader Amazon.com Inc.. In 2018, President Donald Trump’s administration released guidance that urged federal agencies to adopt cloud technology and consider hybrid and multi-cloud models because they “can be effective and efficient.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why 1Life Healthcare Stock Surged Last Week
    Motley Fool

    Why 1Life Healthcare Stock Surged Last Week

    Shares of 1Life Healthcare (NASDAQ: ONEM) rose more than 14% last week, and the stock is up more than 124% over the past three months after closing at $41.60 on Friday. The membership-based healthcare company, which emphasizes its telemedicine options, is obviously well-positioned to grow in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, but is there more behind the stock's rise? San Francisco-based 1Life, which also goes by One Medical, went public Jan. 31 with its shares initially priced at $14, so it has already made a lot of its early investors happy.

  • TikTok’s Massive Data Harvesting Prompts U.S. Security Concerns
    Bloomberg

    TikTok’s Massive Data Harvesting Prompts U.S. Security Concerns

    (Bloomberg) -- TikTok has become one of the world’s most popular apps by serving up a steady beat of lip-syncing videos and viral memes. But behind the scenes the company, owned by one of China’s biggest tech firms, is also scooping up massive amounts of data on Americans and tracking users’ every move.Security researchers say TikTok’s information-collection practices are consistent with Facebook Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google and other U.S. tech companies looking to tailor ads and services to their users. The bigger issue lies in what TikTok does with the intel it gathers. Some groups, like the Democratic and Republican national committees and Wells Fargo & Co., have discouraged or banned people from using the app.“The problem here is not the quantity of data that’s being collected, but rather who else can access it. And those problems exist on the end of data transmission that no one but TikTok can see,” said Oded Vanunu, head of products vulnerability research at Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., who discovered a security hole in the app last year that has since been resolved.There’s little doubt the backlash against TikTok stems in part from the ongoing economic and political rivalry between Washington and Beijing. When U.S. President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Michael Pompeo said that they were considering banning the app last week, both indicated such a move would be one way to retaliate against China over its handling of the coronavirus.The company, part of ByteDance Ltd. and incorporated in the Cayman Islands, has consistently denied that it hands over data to Beijing and has taken measures to try to distance itself from its Chinese roots. ByteDance is considering changing TikTok’s corporate structure to include a new management board and a separate global headquarters, people familiar with the plans said last week. In June, former Walt Disney Co. executive Kevin Mayer became TikTok’s first American chief executive officer.U.S. officials haven’t provided any proof publicly that TikTok is sharing information with the Chinese government. The company says American user data is stored in servers in the U.S. and Singapore, not China.TikTok’s terms of service do, however, stipulate that the company may share information with its parent, subsidiary or other affiliate. Previous versions of TikTok’s privacy policy warned users it could exchange information with its Chinese businesses, law enforcement agencies and public authorities, if legally required to do so.Another reason why TikTok prompts more concern than other social media sites is that the app, which counts more than 2 billion users worldwide including 165 million American users, has attracted a large proportion of young people. TikTok starts collecting data the minute you download the app, according to researchers. It tracks the websites you’re browsing and how you type, down to keystroke rhythms and patterns, according to the company’s privacy policies and terms of service. The app warns users it has full access to photos, videos and contact information of friends stored in the device’s address book, unless you revoke those permissions.Even when you’re not singing and dancing around your living room, the app tracks everywhere you go using your IP address and GPS coordinates, providing the app with your precise location while working, voting, attending protests, traveling, or simply picking up milk from the grocery store. You can disable all GPS collection on your devices, but that would shut off access to apps that need location data to function, like Google maps.Once you use TikTok for a few days, the app has a good idea of what you look like, how you hold your phone, who your friends are, what videos you like to watch, what topics you’re interested in and what websites you visit. It reads the messages you compose and exchange on the app. TikTok can then match this data to other information collected about users from third-party services and publicly available sources.TikTok’s iPhone version verifies users and their devices using an authentication tool researchers have identified as vulnerable to a malicious cyber attack, according to a report by cybersecurity firm Zimperium Inc. TikTok hasn’t been used as a platform to launch such an attack, according to ZecOps, a sister company to Zimperium.American tech companies have also been accused of bending data privacy rules to enhance information gathering. In June, Google was sued for illegally collecting users’ browser history even when set to ‘incognito mode,’ a claim it denies.“We know that Google and Facebook collect a lot of the same data, but they use it to make more money,” said Kirsten Martin, professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business. “The problem lies in not knowing what TikTok is doing with the data, if they are manipulating it and whether the data is going into the hands of an adversary.”Most recently, researchers found that TikTok had access to the words and images users had cut and paste on their devices, whether it was an innocuous shopping list or sensitive passwords. Researchers identified 56 other apps doing the same thing, including AccuWeather and The New York Times. TikTok has said it has since disabled the function on iOS.“TikTok collects much less U.S. user information than many of the companies in our space and stores it in the U.S. and Singapore,” a company spokesman said. “We have not, and would not, give it to the Chinese government.”The ability to track a person’s every move and assemble a behavioral profile is a key reason the Pentagon warned U.S. military personnel in January to delete TikTok from their phones. That precise data could be deadly in the wrong hands, said Republican Senator Josh Hawley, who has introduced a bill to ban TikTok on all government-issued devices.Amazon.com Inc. last week sent a notice to employees to delete TikTok, but later said the email was sent in error. TikTok was also among the dozens of apps from Chinese companies banned by India last month over security and privacy concerns.ByteDance is already under a U.S. national security review for its 2017 acquisition of Musical.ly, a startup it later merged with TikTok. Critics say the app could be used for foreign influence campaigns and that it censors videos in line with Beijing’s priorities. TikTok’s data practices are also the subject of inquiries by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice and at least two class action suits.Experts question why TikTok would be treated any differently than any other company expected to give Beijing whatever data it asks for, as required by China’s cybersecurity laws.“At the end of the day TikTok is a Chinese company,” said Kiersten Todt, a former Obama administration official and resident scholar at the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Cyber Law, Policy and Security.And in any case, TikTok doesn’t necessarily have to hand over data to Beijing for China to gain access to it, Todt said. U.S. intelligence officials have documented decades of Chinese espionage, including a massive 2017 hack of U.S. credit reporting agency Equifax and the personal data of about 145 million Americans, she said. “The prevalence and saturation of TikTok gives the Chinese government tremendous access.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google in talks to invest $4 billion in Reliance's digital arm, Bloomberg reports
    Reuters

    Google in talks to invest $4 billion in Reliance's digital arm, Bloomberg reports

    Alphabet Inc's Google is in advanced talks to invest $4 billion for a stake in the digital arm of Indian conglomerate Reliance Industries Ltd, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter. Google declined to comment, while Reliance did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The funding spree, which began late April, and a share sale by Reliance have helped make India's biggest company by market value net-debt free.

  • Bloomberg

    India's Digital Future Means a Google Search

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- For a long time, U.S.-based internet giants entertained the idea of finally accessing the world’s biggest market and tapping into a base of more than 1.3 billion potential consumers. Now, just as the door to China appears firmly shut, the next giant market is opening up.Alphabet Inc. CEO Sundar Pichai is ready to realize India’s potential with the one way executives know best: a big fat check. The American search-engine giant said its Google unit plans to spend $10 billion over the next seven years on operations, infrastructure and investments as a “reflection of our confidence in the future of India and its digital economy.”American corporate leaders from Apple Inc.’s Tim Cook and Amazon.com Inc.’s Jeff Bezos to Facebook Inc.’s Mark Zuckerberg have all known that India could be the next big thing. Pichai, himself Indian-born, hasn’t sat idly by, either.Their entry has been slowed by lack of broad-based demand for services offered only in English, a national market fragmented by whimsical local taxation, and an inadequate road and warehousing network that would facilitate quick e-commerce logistics.Favorable Chinese treatment, and protectionism, allowed Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and Tencent Holdings Ltd. to develop super-apps that deliver a smorgasbord of offerings from instant messaging to news and deliveries to financial services. No U.S. giant offers anywhere near the breadth and depth of services as their Chinese counterparts.Indian oil billionaire Mukesh Ambani has designs on doing in his home country just what the Americans couldn’t do in theirs. Four years ago, he upended the telecommunications sector with a new entrant that offered free voice calls and really cheap data. Suddenly, hundreds of millions more Indian consumers had a mobile phone in their hands and a reliable, affordable internet connection. Ambani followed that up by getting Facebook to buy a 10% percent stake in Jio Platforms Ltd. — Ambani’s holding company for telcos, media and other digital assets — for $5.7 billion. With Facebook now owning a stake in Jio, it makes sense for Google to look for its own telco dance partner, be it Bharti Airtel Ltd. or Vodafone Idea Ltd. — the only two meaningful competitors to Jio’s wireless service that are still left in the fray.Google’s big move is well-timed. The nation’s largely state-owned banking system was in bad shape even before Covid-19. After the inevitable pandemic-linked losses, institutions will be grateful to limp again and digital commerce will present a new growth avenue. When Indian consumers need loans, they’ll be giving consent to lenders to digitally piece together their credit history by pulling scraps from everywhere. Suppliers of goods and services will also want to tap cheaper working capital by sharing a real-time snapshot of their cash flows.Indian banks are at a disadvantage in the coming shakeup. Information collection, analysis and distribution is exactly what the U.S. internet companies do best. Jio with Facebook, Google (with or without a chosen partner), and even Amazon.com could have deeper insights into consumer and supplier habits than the traditional financiers. A Jio or Google-backed finance app could dish out a loan faster than a banker could pull out a ballpoint pen. That would leave the state-owned lenders offering little more than their vast balance sheets for credit creation.Not only is India finally getting the fast mobile coverage it sorely needs, its payments infrastructure is also ready. Pichai has built a payments service specifically for India, using the local platform that allows any two parties, holding accounts at different banks, to send and receive money instantly without knowing anything more than each others’ virtual IDs. The revamped network is so modern and innovation-friendly that Google has asked the U.S. to consider emulating it.Jio has garnered much of the recent attention, helped by a splashy fundraising spectacle that adds up to half of the investment in global telecom deals this year. But Google’s payment app as well as WalMart’s PhonePe have been quietly scaling up. Now, when Indian consumers want deliveries, entertainment, or a loan there’s a good chance they’ll be searching Google. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andy Mukherjee is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies and financial services. He previously was a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He has also worked for the Straits Times, ET NOW and Bloomberg News.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • S&P 500 Swings From Gains to Losses as Tech Giants Tumble
    Motley Fool

    S&P 500 Swings From Gains to Losses as Tech Giants Tumble

    PepsiCo giant kicked off the week with solid earnings, and a major gambling market is set to reopen this week. It wasn't enough to keep stocks from turning down sharply at the end of the day as we head into earnings season.

  • Google, Facebook side with colleges in ICE fight
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Google, Facebook side with colleges in ICE fight

    Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Keenan joins The First Trade with Alexis Christoforous and Brian Sozzi to discuss tech giants including Google, Facebook siding with colleges after the Trump administration ruled international students would have to leave if their colleges go “online only" due to COVID-19.

  • Google offers data pledge in bid to win EU okay for Fitbit buy
    Reuters

    Google offers data pledge in bid to win EU okay for Fitbit buy

    Alphabet Inc's Google has offered not to use health data of fitness tracker company Fitbit to help it target ads in an attempt to address EU antitrust concerns about its proposed $2.1 billion acquisition, the U.S. tech company said late on Monday. The bid, announced in November last year, would help Google take on market leader Apple and Samsung in the fitness-tracking and smart-watch market, alongside others including Huawei and Xiaomi.

  • Baystreet

    Stocks Finish Wild Day Negative

    Equities in Canada’s largest centre shook off gains accumulated Monday, and nose-dived into the red ...

  • Motley Fool

    Meal-Delivery Space Consolidates Further

    In this episode of Industry Focus: Tech, Dylan Lewis chats with Motley Fool contributor Brian Feroldi about the latest news from Wall Street. They discuss further consolidation happening in the meal-delivery space and how it will impact the companies, restaurants, and consumers.