Canada markets close in 1 hour 19 minutes

Alphabet Inc. (GOOG)

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
Add to watchlist
155.17-2.29 (-1.45%)
As of 02:41PM EDT. Market open.
Full screen
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
Previous Close157.46
Open157.75
Bid155.11 x 200
Ask155.20 x 100
Day's Range153.91 - 157.99
52 Week Range103.27 - 161.70
Volume11,607,701
Avg. Volume22,996,025
Market Cap1.919T
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.05
PE Ratio (TTM)26.75
EPS (TTM)5.80
Earnings DateApr 23, 2024 - Apr 29, 2024
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est165.29
  • Yahoo Finance Video

    Streaming: Are consumers fed up with subscription costs yet?

    Streaming services have raised subscriptions costs in recent years with a potential for prices to keep increasing down the line. With inflation making its way through consumer goods and services, how are consumers feeling about these price increases? Will they continue to opt in to select services or should streaming companies like Amazon Prime Video (AMZN) be worried? D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University Associate Dean of Research and Professor of Marketing Koen Pauwels joins Wealth! to give insight into how consumers are reacting to rising subscription costs from streaming providers.  "If you're the kind of consumer who is relatively price insensitive and you don't want to be bothered with ads and you want all of your shows to be on one kind of data provider so you don't have to lose the time to figure out which show is where, then you're going to settle [and] select for this ad-free tier," Pauwels points out, "which also means that Netflix (NFLX) can continue raising prices on that one because their pool of consumers choosing for this non-ad service is going to be more restricted, more selective who don't care about prices that much." For more expert insight and the latest market action, click here to watch this full episode of Wealth! This post was written by Nicholas Jacobino

  • Reuters

    Google scraps minimum wage, benefits rules for suppliers and staffing firms

    Alphabet Inc's Google on Friday said it will roll back requirements that U.S. suppliers and staffing firms pay their employees at least $15 an hour and provide health insurance and other benefits, a move that could allow the tech giant to avoid bargaining with unions. The elimination of the 2019 policy, along with other steps such as limiting access by temporary workers and vendors to internal systems, are designed to comply with shifting U.S. and global labor regulations related to contingent workers, a spokesperson for Mountain View, California-based Google told Reuters. "These updates bring us in line with other large companies and simply clarify that Google is not, and has never been, the employer of our suppliers’ employees," the spokesperson said.

  • The Telegraph

    Google staff ordered to leave politics at home after anti-Israel protests

    Google’s chief executive has told staff to leave their politics at home in a rebuke to employees who have campaigned against its work with the Israeli government.