BBD-A.TO - Bombardier Inc.

Toronto - Toronto Delayed Price. Currency in CAD
0.6900
+0.0100 (+1.47%)
At close: 3:54PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close0.6800
Open0.7000
Bid0.6800 x 0
Ask0.6900 x 0
Day's Range0.6700 - 0.7100
52 Week Range0.6100 - 2.9200
Volume278,219
Avg. Volume305,872
Market Cap1.156B
Beta (5Y Monthly)2.41
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.7630
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateDec. 09, 2014
1y Target EstN/A
  • The Canadian Press

    Most actively traded companies on the TSX

    TORONTO — Some of the most active companies traded Wednesday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (13,925.714, up 311.57 points.)Hexo Corp. (TSX:HEXO). Health care. Down 25 cents, or 26.04 per cent, to 71 cents on 14.4 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Industrials. Up three cents, or 6.74 per cent, to 47.5 cents on 12.5 million shares. Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE). Energy. Up nine cents, or 2.34 per cent, to $3.94 on 10 million shares.Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Up eight cents, or 7.14 per cent, to $1.20 on 7.9 million shares.MEG Energy Corp. (TSX:MEG). Energy. Up six cents, or 2.11 per cent, to $2.91 on 7.8 million shares.Crescent Point Energy Corp. (TSX:CPG). Energy. Up one cent, or 0.71 per cent to $1.42 on 12.7 million shares.Air Canada (TSX:AC). Industrials. Up $2.09, or 12.61 per cent, to $18.66 on 7.3 million shares. Companies in the news:Air Canada — the airline plans to rehire 16,500 laid-off workers via Ottawa's emergency wage subsidy, though the vast majority will remain at home amid the collapse of global travel triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. The company said Wednesday it will apply for the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy to retain or bring back workers who were let go under a cost reduction program that saw nearly half of Air Canada's 36,000 employees lose their jobs as air traffic skidded to a halt due to the virus.Cogeco Inc. (TSX:CCA). Down 40 cents, or 0.42 per cent, to $95.50. The company says its Quebec-based radio business has temporarily laid off about one-quarter of its employees due to a significant decline in advertising from retailers affected by COVID-19 shutdowns. Cogeco chief executive Philippe Jette says its radio stations have maintained good ratings during the pandemic by providing news, information and music during the crisis.Maple Leaf Foods Inc. (TSX:MFI). Down $1.26, or five per cent, to $24.02. The company is suspending operations at its poultry plant in Brampton, Ont., after three employees at the facility tested positive for COVID-19. The company says it's deep cleaning the plant including common areas and offices as it completes an investigation into the casesThis report by The Canadian Press was first published April 8, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • A Weak Canadian Dollar Could Make These 3 Stocks Skyrocket
    The Motley Fool

    A Weak Canadian Dollar Could Make These 3 Stocks Skyrocket

    A weak Canadian dollar is a boon to exporters. The Enbridge stock, Barrick Gold stock, and Bombardier stock could be the beneficiaries. However, the impact of COVID-19 and subsequent recession poses a problem to export-related businesses.The post A Weak Canadian Dollar Could Make These 3 Stocks Skyrocket appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Is Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock an Upside Machine in Disguise?
    The Motley Fool

    Is Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock an Upside Machine in Disguise?

    Bombardier, Inc. (TSX:BBD.B) is a falling knife. But has it hit the bottom, and just how much upside could it offer to investors?The post Is Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock an Upside Machine in Disguise? appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Bombardier faces tough questions about future as share price, credit rating fall
    The Canadian Press

    Bombardier faces tough questions about future as share price, credit rating fall

    MONTREAL — When he officially succeeds Alain Bellemare as CEO of Bombardier Inc. on Monday, Eric Martel will confront sobering questions about the future of a Quebec institution grappling with share-price lows, credit downgrades and a financial position some deem "unsustainable."The plane-and-train maker's stock sunk to its lowest level in more than 25 years on Friday, closing at 40.5 cents.The stock plunge came after Fitch Ratings last week cut its credit rating to CCC from CCC+ several days after the manufacturer suspended Canadian production due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Standard & Poor's has also lowered its rating for the company to CCC+ from B-, entrenching its junk status.Meanwhile, 12,400 Bombardier employees remain on unpaid leave.S&P said Bombardier's “financial commitments appear unsustainable in the long term,” warning that the company may have to restructure its debt within 12 months.The Montreal-based firm carries US$9.3 billion in debt despite multiple asset sales over the past five years. It will be reduced to a single revenue stream — business jets — after announcing the sale of its rail division to French train giant Alstom SA in February, just as demand for private planes falls away amid the broader economic slowdown triggered by the outbreak.The sale once again shrank a company that a year ago boasted three major divisions — commercial aircraft, trains and business jets.“It's not looking great. Just not looking great," said Richard Aboulafia, an aviation analyst with Teal Group in the Washington, D.C., area.The collapse of oil prices around the globe could ripple out to Bombardier, he said, as large oil-producing companies and states pull back on expenditures like large-cabin private jets — Bombardier's Global 7500 lists for US$73 million.Liquidity risks remain a "top-of-mind concern," said Seth Seifman of J.P. Morgan.While the ultra-long-range Global 7500 is sold out through 2022, Seifman lowered his forecast on business jet deliveries by more than 100 for the next two years — to 91 planes from 162 for 2020 and to 129 planes from 164 for 2021."Our downward revisions are the result of supply constraints from COVID-19, with Bombardier closing its Canadian manufacturing operations through at least April 20, as well as expectations for lower business jet demand, including deferrals and cancellations, because of the economic fallout from the virus," Seifman said in a research note.Disruption to the aeronautics supply chain presents another problem, with plane makers depending on hundreds of suppliers that are now at risk as giants like Boeing Co. and Airbus SE halt production.Bombardier spokesman Olivier Marcil took issue with the credit rating agency downgrades."We disagree with the S&P and Fitch analyses. In particular, S&P acknowledges that its analysis is based on a forecast that is 'highly uncertain at this time,'" Marcil noted. "The comments as to the debt measures that we may possibly have to take are only pure speculation."Marcil pointed to the agencies' acknowledgment of Bombardier's solid short-term liquidity. "In addition, the reports recognize Bombardier's advantageous positioning in the large business jet sector and our well-filled order book," he said in an email.Looming on the horizon are debt maturities of US$1.48 billion and US$1.7 billion due in 2021 and 2022 respectively. About 60 per cent of the US$9.32-billion total debt is due within five years.The US$8.2-billion deal with Alstom and other recent transactions will leave Bombardier with net proceeds of between US$4.2 billion and US$4.5 billion after deducting the Caisse de depot's equity position, as well as adjustments for debts and other liabilities, Bombardier said in February.The deal is expected to close in the first half of 2021, if it can move through European Union regulatory hurdles.Bombardier shored up its cash reserves with the sale of its remaining stake in the A220 commercial jetliner program to Airbus in February, netting US$531 million so far with US$60 million more expected as part of a bonus structure in the deal.And it continues to work on closing the US$550-million divestiture of its CRJ region jet program to Mitsubishi and the US$500-million sale of its aerostructures business in Belfast and Morocco to Spirit AeroSystems, both of which were initially expected in the first half of 2020.Bombardier’s price has sunk to roughly half its previous 25-year low in February 2016, raising questions about whether it will remain listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange.TSX rules state that it may delist a company if "it appears that the public distribution, price, or trading activity of the securities has been so reduced as to make further dealings in the securities on TSX unwarranted."Asked about Bombardier's status, spokeswoman Catherine Kee said in an email that "delistings are a result of a long-term process and careful consideration, they are not determined quickly."This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 3, 2020.— with files from Julien ArsenaultCompanies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • Market Crash: Why Did Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock Drop 67%?
    The Motley Fool

    Market Crash: Why Did Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock Drop 67%?

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  • Sophie Brochu appointed first woman chief executive of Hydro-Quebec
    The Canadian Press

    Sophie Brochu appointed first woman chief executive of Hydro-Quebec

    MONTREAL — The former head of Energir will be the first woman to become chief executive of Hydro-Quebec.Sophie Brochu takes over for Eric Martel on Monday, the same day he becomes chief executive of Bombardier Inc., replacing Alain Bellemare. The Quebec government announced the appointment Wednesday.Brochu will work beside Jacynthe Cote, who is chairwoman of the public utility. Brochu joined Energir in 1997, when it was known as Gaz Metropolitan, as vice-president of business development. She held various positions before becoming president and CEO in 2007.Under her leadership, the company purchased Green Mountain Power, Vermont's main electricity distributor, in addition to getting into the production of wind and solar energy.Martel was appointed CEO of the government owned utility in 2015 after 13 years at Bombardier. He put forward a plan to double Hydro-Quebec's revenues and profits by 2030.This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 1, 2020.Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B).The Canadian Press

  • Medical equipment company partners with Linamar to produce made-in-Canada ventilators
    Yahoo Finance Canada

    Medical equipment company partners with Linamar to produce made-in-Canada ventilators

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Tuesday that the federal government will spend $2 billion on protective personal equipment, including masks, face shields, gowns, ventilators, test kits and swabs and hand sanitizer as the country fights the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Retirement Planning: How to Protect Your Portfolio From a Market Crash
    The Motley Fool

    Retirement Planning: How to Protect Your Portfolio From a Market Crash

    Bombardier, Inc. (TSX:BBD.B) is a perfect example of a stock that you shouldn't put in your portfolio if you're planning for retirement.The post Retirement Planning: How to Protect Your Portfolio From a Market Crash appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • European hedge funds struggle as short-selling bans disrupt strategies
    Reuters

    European hedge funds struggle as short-selling bans disrupt strategies

    European hedge funds struggled to navigate the coronavirus-induced extreme market volatility during March, with many down by double-digits in the space of a few weeks as short-selling bans hampered their strategies. Regulators in France, Italy, Belgium and Spain ordered temporary short-selling bans to stop investors betting on a fall in the share price of companies ranging from Spanish bank Santander to Air France-KLM and Italian automaker Fiat Chrysler. Short-selling is a strategy often used by so-called 'event-driven' or 'merger-arbitrage' hedge funds that bet on takeover or merger deals, reducing their risk by shorting, or selling, the acquirer and buying the target company.

  • Will the Quebec Government Bail Out Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Again?
    The Motley Fool

    Will the Quebec Government Bail Out Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Again?

    Bombardier stock has been one of the worst-performing stocks on the TSX in 2020. Here's why the company will struggle to gain investor confidence. The post Will the Quebec Government Bail Out Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Again? appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Bombardier furloughs 12,400 workers, halts plane and rail production in Canada
    The Canadian Press

    Bombardier furloughs 12,400 workers, halts plane and rail production in Canada

    MONTREAL — Bombardier Inc. is temporarily halting production at its Canadian plants, sending 12,400 employees on unpaid leave as the plane maker suspends its 2020 financial forecast due to the COVID-19 pandemic.The company said Tuesday it is stopping all non-essential work in the country, including aircraft and rail production in Quebec — where 9,000 workers are heading home — and Ontario.The shutdown — set to start Tuesday evening and continue until April 26 — comes in response to orders by the Quebec and Ontario governments on Monday to suspend non-essential activities as part of an effort to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus.The stoppage will be in effect nearly two weeks longer than Quebec's required break, which runs until April 13."We give ourselves two weeks to relaunch everything," said Bombardier spokesperson Olivier Marcil. "The supply chain will have to adapt."Bombardier, which carries a hefty debt despite multiple asset sales over the past five years, has cut all discretionary spending and "is pursuing additional measures to enhance liquidity," chairman Pierre Beaudoin said in a statement.The Montreal-based firm, reduced to a single revenue stream after announcing the sale of its rail division to French train giant Alstom SA last month, may face falling demand for new business jets amid the broader economic slowdown triggered by the outbreak.The sale — essential to pay down Bombardier's US$9.3 billion debt — once again shrank a company that a year ago boasted three major divisions — commercial aircraft, trains and business jets."It's hard to see demand for new business jets holding up," Financial Bank analyst Cameron Doerksen said in a phone interview Friday.The COVID-19 crisis is dragging down corporate profits and equities markets, which both correlate strongly with demand for private planes, said Richard Aboulafia, an aviation analyst with Teal Group in the Washington, D.C., area.Last week, Financial Bank lowered its delivery forecast for Bombardier business jets to 145 planes from 154 this year, and to 120 planes from 150 for 2021. The backlog for the Global 7500 — Bombardier's new, ultra-long-range business jet listed at US$73 million apiece — remains healthy, with the aircraft sold out through 2022."The bigger issue is going to be the supply chain, because they’re very complicated pieces of equipment with hundreds if not thousands of suppliers," said AltaCorp Capital analyst Chris Murray, noting the ripple effect of plummeting travel demand for manufacturers.Looming on the horizon are debt maturities of US$1.48 billion and US$1.7 billion due in 2021 and 2022 respectively. About 60 per cent of the US$9.32-billion total debt is due within five years.The US$8.2-billion deal with Alstom and other recent transactions will leave Bombardier with net proceeds of between US$4.2 billion and US$4.5 billion after deducting the Caisse de Depot et Placement's equity position, as well as adjustments for debts and other liabilities, Bombardier said in February.The deal is expected to close in the first half of 2021 if it can move through European Union regulatory hurdles.While competition rules remain a hazard, "governments may think of it as a way to strengthen that part of the industrial landscape by completing the transaction," Murray said.Meanwhile delays and "some volatility" continue to plague several "large, challenging" rail contracts, said Alain Bellemare last month, shortly before his ouster as CEO announced on March 11.Bombardier shares have hit new lows over the past week, hovering between 38 and 50 cents at their cheapest price in decades.In the Montreal area, the affected factories sit in Mirabel, Saint-Laurent, Dorval and Pointe-Claire, and east of Quebec City in La Pocatiere.Bombardier's aerostructures plant in Belfast, Northern Ireland, will also temporarily cease operations until April 20, with the majority of its 3,300 site workers returning home. Last week, the factory in Cespin, France, that specializes in rolling stock had to cease operations until further notice.Executives as well as workers are forgoing pay, Bombardier said Tuesday. Board members have also agreed to forgo compensation for the remainder of the year.Bombardier's now suspended outlook from last month had projected revenue growth to US$15 billion from US$13.7 billion in 2019. The company also forecasted margins for earnings before interest and taxes of 3.5 per cent. Both figures fell below analyst expectations.The multinational continues to work on closing the US$550-million divestiture of its CRJ region jet program to Mitsubishi and the US$500-million sell-off of its aerostructures business in Belfast and Morocco to Spirit AeroSystems, both of which were initially expected in the first half of 2020.This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 24, 2020.Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • GlobeNewswire

    Bombardier Announces Temporary Suspension of Work at its Canadian Operations; Suspends 2020 Financial Guidance

    Bombardier (BBD-B.TO) today announced that in support of the recent mandates from the Governments of Quebec and Ontario to help slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, it will suspend all non-essential work at most of its Canadian based operations starting this evening at 11:59 pm until April 26, 2020, inclusively. This suspension includes Bombardier’s aircraft and rail production activities in the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. Employees impacted by these temporary shutdowns will be placed on furlough, as will corporate office employees whose support functions are less critical in the short-term.

  • WARNING: Avoid These 2 Stocks During This Market Panic
    The Motley Fool

    WARNING: Avoid These 2 Stocks During This Market Panic

    It might be best to avoid investing in the stock of Baytex and Bombardier amid the recent recession led by the coronavirus outbreak.The post WARNING: Avoid These 2 Stocks During This Market Panic appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Coronavirus Could Be the Final Nail in the Coffin for Bombardier’s (TSX:BBD.B) Stock
    The Motley Fool

    Coronavirus Could Be the Final Nail in the Coffin for Bombardier’s (TSX:BBD.B) Stock

    With coronavirus ravaging global travel, Bombardier Inc (TSX:BBD.B) may be finished.The post Coronavirus Could Be the Final Nail in the Coffin for Bombardier’s (TSX:BBD.B) Stock appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • The Canadian Press

    Longview suspends production of Dash 8-400 and Series 400 Twin Otter aircraft

    TORONTO — Longview Aviation Capital Corp. says it's suspending new production of Dash 8-400 and Series 400 Twin Otter aircraft in a move that will affect nearly 1,000 employees.The company says about 800 employees or 65 per cent of De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd.'s current workforce, which produces the Dash 8-400 at the company's Downsview facility in Toronto, will be affected.About 180 employees or 40 per cent of Viking Air Ltd.'s current workforce, which produces the Twin Otter in Victoria and Calgary will also be affected.The suspension applies only to new aircraft production.Longview says De Havilland, which it purchased last June from Bombardier Inc., and Viking will continue to provide full product support and technical services to all in-service De Havilland and Viking aircraft.The company says the aviation industry is facing unprecedented uncertainty as a result of COVID-19 and that it has determined that it's necessary to pause all aircraft production.This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 20, 2020.Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)The Canadian Press

  • Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock: Don’t Catch This Falling Knife
    The Motley Fool

    Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) Stock: Don’t Catch This Falling Knife

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  • The Canadian Press

    New Bombardier CEO faces financial juggling act as recession looms

    MONTREAL — Bombardier Inc.'s new CEO comes on board as the debt-laden plane-and-train maker faces a new future as a pure-play producer of business jets, a cyclical industry bracing for a potential economic storm.The company on Wednesday named Eric Martel as its new president and chief executive, replacing Alain Bellemare effective April 6.Martel rejoins Bombardier from Hydro-Quebec, where he has headed the provincial utility since July 2015. Between 2002 and 2015 he held a raft of senior positions at Bombardier, heading up the business aircraft division in 2014.Martel steps into the cockpit shortly after Bombardier reached a US$8.2-billion deal to sell its rail business to French rail giant Alstom SA, casting off the Quebec company's largest division to help pay down US$9.3 billion in debt and focus solely on private planes.If approved by regulators, the transaction will help Bombardier slash its hefty debt by nearly three-quarters to about US$2.5 billion, capping a five-year turnaround plan that has seen the company shed numerous assets.However, the path ahead is far from clear."The new CEO has a number of challenges to steer the company through over the coming two years, including navigating the current economic challenges and the potential for declining business aircraft orders, and overseeing the finalization of three assets sale deals," said Bank of Montreal analyst Fadi Chamoun.Those deals include the Alstom transaction — likely to face intense regulatory scrutiny in the European Union — as well as the sale of Bombardier's aerostructures business and its CRJ regional jet franchise.The company has already started to ramp up production of high-margin business jets, which it expects will drive double-digit revenue growth with 160 unit sales in 2020 amid a $16.3-billion backlog. But delays and "significant setbacks" have plagued several major contracts for the rail division, Chamoun noted."Martel's role is to help ensure that execution takes place...and working through a number of challenged projects," said AltaCorp Capital analyst Chris Murray. "It feels like they are rectifying those, although it’s slow."The next piece will be shepherding the sale of Bombardier Transportation to Alstom through the regulatory process" — essential to dealing with Bombardier's debt load — he said. "That’s not going to be a simple process….and likely complicated by some of the issues around COVID-19."Murray said that longer-term priorities should include "orderly deleveraging" and investing in the company's three business aircraft brands: Learjets, Challengers and the large-cabin Global.While private jets often yield higher margins, the luxury industry is more volatile than rail, where companies can tap into massive government infrastructure contracts. Reduced to a single jet-stream revenue, Bombardier may well face falling demand for new planes in the event of a broader economic slowdown triggered by the novel coronavirus pandemic."Those aircraft at the lower end of the business jet market, like the Learjet, are more subject to market conditions than larger-cabin, long-range aircraft, which seem to have their own market drivers," Murray said."I wouldn’t expect a material change in strategy," he added.After Bellemare took the helm in 2015, Bombardier sold several divisions to pare down debt, including its turboprop segment and commercial airline unit, once touted as the company's crown jewel.Meanwhile, the rail division sale announced last month shrinks a company that 18 months ago boasted three major divisions — planes, trains and business jets — leaving it with just one at the end of a turnaround that one analyst said looked more like an asset liquidation.The Alstom deal is expected to close next year, if EU antitrust regulators give it the green light."Overall, while we believe Alain Bellemare has done a decent job with the turnaround plan considering the significant challenges the company faced at the time of his arrival in February 2015, we believe investors will welcome the refreshed leadership at the corporate level in light of the stock's recent price performance," Desjardins Securities analyst Benoit Poirier said in a note.Pierre Beaudoin, chairman of the Bombardier board of directors, said Martel is the right leader at the right time for Bombardier as the company focuses on business jets."He is an engaging builder with a deep understanding of our organization and product portfolio as well as of the global business aircraft industry," Beaudoin said late Wednesday in a release.The company declined interview requests with Martel and Bellemare.This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 12, 2020Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • Business jet operators see demand surge on U.S. travel restrictions, coronavirus
    Reuters

    Business jet operators see demand surge on U.S. travel restrictions, coronavirus

    MONTREAL/BEIJING March 12 (Reuters) - New U.S. restrictions on Europeans entering the United States are fueling additional bookings for business jet flights, which were already in higher demand this year because of coronavirus, executives said on Thursday. Travelers are rushing to return to the United States before a 30-day U.S. ban starts on Friday on foreign citizens entering the country if they have traveled to Europe in recent weeks. The U.S. order, announced Wednesday to curtail the coronavirus outbreak, applies to citizens of 26 European countries but excludes Britain and Ireland as well as American citizens.

  • Eric Martel leaving Hydro-Quebec to become president, CEO of Bombardier
    The Canadian Press

    Eric Martel leaving Hydro-Quebec to become president, CEO of Bombardier

    MONTREAL — Bombardier Inc. is replacing chief executive Alain Bellemare as it moves ahead with its new focus on business jets.Bombardier said Eric Martel has been appointed president and chief executive officer and a member of the Bombardier board of directors, effective April 6.Martel joins Bombardier from Hydro-Québec, where he served as president and chief executive officer since July 2015.Prior to joining Hydro-Quebec, Martel held a number of leadership positions at Bombardier, including president of the business aircraft division and president of the customer services and specialized aircraft division.Pierre Beaudoin, chairman of the Bombardier board of directors, said Martel is the right leader at the right time for Bombardier as the company focuses on business jets."He is an engaging builder with a deep understanding of our organization and product portfolio as well as of the global business aircraft industry," Beaudoin said late Wednesday in a release. "He has enjoyed great success in his career through operational excellence, tight management of complex manufacturing processes and a personalized approach towards customers."Martel said he is excited and honoured to rejoin Bombardier as it begins a new chapter."I have always been passionate about Bombardier, its employees and products, and I look forward to building a highly successful, agile and focused company, capable of providing unmatched service to customers, world-class opportunities to employees and creating value for our shareholders," Martel said in a release.Beaudoin said with its turnaround plan almost complete, the board, including Bellemare, agreed it was time for a leadership change.Bellemare said he is proud of what Bombardier has accomplished in recent years.Hydro-Quebec was not immediately available for comment.Last month, Bombardier reached a US$8.2-billion deal to sell its rail business to French rail giant Alstom SA, narrowing the Quebec company's focus to business jets while casting off its largest division to help pay down US$9.3 billion in debt.The sale shrinks a company that a year ago boasted three major divisions — planes, trains and business jets — leaving it with just one at the end of a five-year turnaround that one analyst said looked more like an asset liquidation.Bombardier sold several divisions since Bellemare took the helm in 2015, including its turboprop and aerostructure segments as well as its commercial airline unit, once touted as the company's crown jewel.The Montreal-based company announced in January that it was working to reduce debt and pursuing strategic options.This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 11, 2020 Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B)The Canadian Press

  • GlobeNewswire

    Bombardier Announces Leadership Change

    MONTRÉAL, March 11, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bombardier (BBD-B.TO) announced today that Éric Martel has been appointed President and Chief Executive Officer, and a member of the Bombardier Board of Directors, effective April 6, 2020. Éric Martel joins Bombardier from Hydro-Québec, where he has served as President and Chief Executive Officer since July 2015. With revenues of approximately $10 billion (USD), Hydro-Québec is one of the largest producers of hydroelectricity in the world.

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    The Motley Fool

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  • Will Bombardier Stock Soar on Business Jets Alone?
    The Motley Fool

    Will Bombardier Stock Soar on Business Jets Alone?

    What may help Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B) soar? Read on about the future of its CSeries, train and business jet divisions.The post Will Bombardier Stock Soar on Business Jets Alone? appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.