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Zager Guitars Make A Positive Impact On Future Generations of Musicians

Zager Guitars
·3 min read

Lincoln, Nebraska, Jan. 22, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Few songs become such classics that they're played during moon landings, but the Zager & Evans classic song, "In the Year 2525," made the cut to be played during the first lunar landing. The haunting melody was a signature effect that Denny Zager fine-tuned to make the lyrics fit the song better. His guitar skill became undeniable when the duo first performed the song and stunned the audience. The audience demanded the song be played again and again, and it dominated the charts during the lunar landing.


Unexpected Notoriety Stuns Zager & Evans


Neither artist expected the impact the song would make. Time Magazine featured a picture of the duo on its cover with the sensational headline, "The Beatles would be jealous." That was overwhelming for two Nebraska farm kids turned folk singers.


Rick Evans revealed that it only took about 10 minutes to write the lyrics, which he wrote in the back of a Volkswagen van after spending the night partying. It was the 1960s, and Mary Jane was a frequent inspiration for the music of the era. The song's lyrics suggested that technology was taking over and referred to test-tube babies, machines taking over, and pills that controlled the mind as part of a dystopian future. Ironically, it didn't take until 2525 to experience all these things, but the song's real value lies in what it imparts about an apocalyptic future.


Evans played the song with several bands, but it wasn't until teaming with Zager and his retooling of the melody that the song took off into the stratosphere and, eventually, a moon landing. The song sat at #1 in the charts for six weeks, which included the time when mankind took its giant leap by claiming the moon.


More About Zager Guitars


Rick Evans died in February of 2018, but Denny Zager continues to tinker with guitars at his music shop in Lincoln, Nebraska. After touring the world, Zager retired, partly because playing the guitar caused him lots of pain. He turned his attention to fine-tuning guitar design and retooling guitars to make them easier to play. The line of Zager Guitars that bears his name is known for ease of use for professional musicians without the accompanying finger pain and the top-rated materials used in construction.


Some people pursue music for fame and fortune, but plenty of musicians make playing a hobby or career because of their love for music. Zager falls squarely into the latter category because he was never comfortable with fame and the frenetic touring scene.


Zager returned to Lincoln, Nebraska, after retiring and set up his music shop to build better guitars for professional musicians. He loves to play, but he feels that guitar manufacturers should keep the musician's comfort at the top of the design criteria.


Concerned over the future of guitar playing, Zager developed an alternative system for learning how to play. The system focused on quickly learning to play real songs, instead of the tedious repetitions of scales and chords. Zager himself suffered from dyslexia, and he was never able to grok classic learning methods. This problem came to his notice when trying to teach his son to play in 1972.


Whether it's the moon landing, his Zager Guitar shop, his love of playing the guitar, or Zager's learning system, he has made quite an impact on future generations. That's why ordering one of his guitars should be a top priority of serious musicians, whether they want to play professionally or not.

CONTACT: contact@zagerguitars.com