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Top Crypto Bets

Top Crypto Bets

14.99k followers14 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

This list will track the publicly traded companies that are making bets, big and small, on cryptocurrencies like bitcoin and ether. Yahoo Finance will update this list as new companies enter the crypto space.

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  • Visa Doubles Down on Fintech
    Motley Fool

    Visa Doubles Down on Fintech

    The world's largest credit card company is showing a renewed interest in how financial technology can grow its network.

  • 3 Top Stocks That Are Cash Cows
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Stocks That Are Cash Cows

    Apple, Amazon, and PayPal are swamped in cash and could swamp your portfolio with great returns.

  • Why Is Microsoft (MSFT) Down 0.2% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Microsoft (MSFT) Down 0.2% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Microsoft (MSFT) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • NVIDIA's Earnings Suggest It's Got Its Game Back; Stock Pops 7.3%
    Motley Fool

    NVIDIA's Earnings Suggest It's Got Its Game Back; Stock Pops 7.3%

    While the graphics-chip specialist's year-over-year results were poor, its sequential growth was solid.

  • Bloomberg

    How Asia Can Protect Its Crazy Riches

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- With support for globalization and free trade declining in much of the world, Asia has a historic chance to break out of its traditional role as a capital exporter to the West and to instead redirect flows to improve its own economies and financial industries.According to some estimates, the region’s pool of wealth at $110 trillion exceeds those of North America and Europe and  is growing faster.  Japan and China were at or near the top of foreign portfolio investment in the United States, including stocks and short- and long-term bonds, in 2017 with $2 trillion and $1.5 trillion respectively, a U.S. Treasury survey showed.   Yet Asia has a poor record of protecting its assets stranded overseas when the cycle turns. In the 1990s, Japanese investors incurred significant losses, primarily on property. During the 2008 crisis, a range of Asian sovereign wealth funds and high net-worth individuals lost heavily on advanced economy shares, real estate, and mortgage-backed and structured securities.The desire to invest overseas partly reflects concern about political risk and governance at home. But leaving familiar territory brings other risks.Distance, language and cultural differences can put Asian investors at a disadvantage when it comes to information. As a result, investors often rely too heavily on intermediaries whose interests don’t align with their own.Their main failing, though, is a bias toward certain assets. In an echo of the ill-fated Japanese purchases of Rockefeller Center and the Pebble Beach golf course in the 1980s, Asian investors are buying prime office buildings in New York and London. Swanky apartments are quickly snapped up in world cities, especially by Chinese buyers.Lacking cozy domestic informational networks, Asian investors are particularly susceptible to chasing name asset managers or fashionable businesses. That restricts their options since the best funds are frequently closed to new arrivals. Managers often can’t repeat past results. Inadequate expertise frequently leads to unwise choices. In the run-up to 2008, Asian banks and investors suffered losses on purchases of structured products and collateralized debt obligations, or CDOs. High net-worth and retail segments are buying again. Japanese banks have purchased up to 75% of AAA tranches of collateralized loan obligations, and perhaps one-third of all CLOs, which have common features with CDOs.Where investments are leveraged, they must be financed by borrowing dollars and euros in wholesale markets. Losses may create difficulties in rolling over funding. As in 2008, forced sales and the lack of trading liquidity will accelerate declines in prices.Why look abroad at all? There is a mismatch between Asian savings and the size of domestic capital markets, which are marked by low returns, a smaller range of investment products and limited local expertise. The regional rivalries between Singapore, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Mumbai and Tokyo and a bias toward real industry have hampered the development of financial services.Asia lacks quality indigenous banks such as JPMorgan Chase & Co. or The Goldman Sachs Group Inc., or asset managers such as BlackRock Inc. or Pacific Investment Management Co. Most financial institutions are domestically focused. In 2018, assets under management at Asian hedge funds fell 10% to just over $100 billion, a mere 3% of the global total. Private wealth management remains the preserve of Western firms.Asia’s high savings are a global anomaly, driven by rising incomes, a culture of thrift and minimal social safety nets. Governments need to move with greater determination to enable more savings to be absorbed locally. The timing may be right as the world is tilting more toward national interests and self-sufficiency.The first step must be to accelerate development of capital markets to boost size, depth, liquidity and investment choices. Revised listing and issuance rules, harmonized pan-Asian regulations, breakups of family dominated conglomerates, and partial or full privatization of key state-owned firms would improve market depth. Changes in rules and tax incentives should encourage local pension funds or insurance companies to adopt stable, long-term investment practices.Second, the creation of world-class financial institutions and skilled asset managers needs to be a priority. To attract the best and brightest, limited career choices and pay that lags behind international levels need to be addressed. State-sponsored financial skills training and accreditation systems should be improved. A system of mutual recognition of qualifications would increase labor mobility.Finally, retaining capital within Asia requires improving confidence in the security of savings. Key steps include creating independent institutions free from political interference, as well as bolstering the rule of law and transparent and consistent regulations. Singapore and Hong Kong, despite its recent protests, are examples to emulate.Without change, the familiar cycle of exuberant foreign investment and the loss of Asian wealth is likely to be repeated in the next downturn. To contact the author of this story: Satyajit Das at sdassydney@gmail.comTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Patrick McDowell at pmcdowell10@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Satyajit Das is a former banker and the author, most recently, of "A Banquet of Consequences."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • NVIDIA's Earnings Plunged As Expected
    Motley Fool

    NVIDIA's Earnings Plunged As Expected

    The graphics chip designer's profits were cut in half in its fiscal second quarter, and guidance for the current period was set even lower.

  • NVIDIA Is on the Road to Growth, and Its Stock Is Soaring
    Motley Fool

    NVIDIA Is on the Road to Growth, and Its Stock Is Soaring

    The graphics processing specialist appears to have turned the corner with two quarters of sequential increases.

  • What Happened in the Stock Market Today
    Motley Fool

    What Happened in the Stock Market Today

    On a day stocks bounced back, NVIDIA shares rose after the company reported a strong quarter, as did those of Deere despite challenges in the agricultural industry.

  • Nvidia Impresses Investors With A Bright Future Ahead
    Zacks

    Nvidia Impresses Investors With A Bright Future Ahead

    As both Nvidia and AMD compete to create the next best AI and cloud computing GPUs, the tech is only going to proliferate in performance and both companies stand to gain.

  • NVIDIA Earnings Revive Confidence: Is the Worst Over?
    Market Realist

    NVIDIA Earnings Revive Confidence: Is the Worst Over?

    NVIDIA (NVDA) stock soared 6% in today’s trading session as its Q2 earnings for fiscal 2020 beat estimates. However, its guidance missed estimates.

  • Motley Fool

    NVIDIA Is Getting Its Groove Back

    The graphics computer chip specialist posted its second consecutive quarter of sequential growth in the gaming segment.

  • Goldman's Copsey Keeps Faith in Stocks Amid ‘Overdone’ Bond Run
    Bloomberg

    Goldman's Copsey Keeps Faith in Stocks Amid ‘Overdone’ Bond Run

    (Bloomberg) -- It’s hard enough to find a stock bull these days. But one sanguine enough about the economic outlook to forecast just one more rate cut this year? That’s a contrarian.While Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s investment management arm is still waiting for better entry levels to buy the dip, it continues to favor equities and credit over government bonds in a rejection of growing fears of an imminent recession. The unit, which oversees about $1.7 trillion, expects the Federal Reserve to lower rates only once more in 2019 before eventually returning to a hiking cycle, versus the futures market that’s pricing in a good chance of three more cuts.Goldman’s stance goes against the consensus investor view that has triggered a rally in bonds while punishing stocks in August. Bond funds saw the fourth-biggest ever week of inflows through Aug. 14, while equity funds saw outflows, according to a Bank of America Corp. report.“We don’t subscribe to the view that this is the end of the business cycle,” said London-based executive director David Copsey, who is part of the global portfolio solutions group managing about $122 billion at Goldman Sachs Asset Management. “If our central thesis comes true -- which is economic growth continues to slow from an elevated level but remains around trend in the second half of the year and recessionary risk is low -- we would believe core inflation will gradually continue to grind higher.”Ripe for ContrariansWith global shares erasing $4 trillion this month, the riskiest credit buckling and government bonds reaching parabolic levels, the time seems ripe for contrarian bullishness. But it’s not for the faint of heart: securities have swung wildly all week between conflicting trade headlines and a bond market flashing recessionary signals.Copsey rejects several of the market’s glummest theses. An inverted yield curve isn’t always immediately followed by a recession, he stresses. In his view, the usual signals of fragility -- debt levels of households and non-financial corporations -- are still quite benign. The U.S. core personal consumption expenditure index, one measure of inflation, has been picking up, he notes.He also doubts the current impact of the U.S.-China trade war will be strong enough to end the global growth cycle.“There’s potentially a natural barrier on how bad things can get because ultimately while both sides have credible concerns and credible agendas that they’re looking to pursue, neither of them wants to ultimately negatively affect their domestic long-term growth prospects,” he said by phone late Thursday.Credit Suisse Group AG strategists too argue that the yield curve is not necessarily flashing a sell sign for equities. The most dependable signals still show a recession is unlikely before 2021, they wrote in a note Thursday, saying they are overweight European cyclicals -- some of the most beaten up stocks in this month’s sell-off.Some dip-buying was evident on Friday. The S&P 500 climbed 0.9% as of 9:42 a.m. in New York, while the Stoxx Europe 600 was up 1%.Within stocks, Copsey’s team is looking for shares with high dividends and dislocated value rather than exposure to the market’s broader direction or cyclical risk. Another contrarian view: it’s overweight Europe, especially economies such as Spain’s that are more domestically driven, as that region is cheaper and some temporary headwinds to growth should fade, he said. It’s neutral on the U.S. and emerging markets.As for government bonds, he says they’ve probably run their course.“The reaction from bonds is probably somewhat overdone now,” Copsey said. “To justify these yield levels and the market pricing of rate cuts, we would need to see a further deterioration in the growth data, beyond our current expectations.”(Updates market moves in 10th paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Justina Lee in London at jlee1489@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Blaise Robinson at brobinson58@bloomberg.net, Namitha Jagadeesh, Jon MenonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Semiconductor Stocks Sensitive to China’s Retaliation
    Market Realist

    Semiconductor Stocks Sensitive to China’s Retaliation

    The market fell on August 14 when China threatened to retaliate against US tariffs. This news hit semiconductor stocks, which depend on China for revenue.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - S&P Rallies as Techs Climb and Trade Tensions Ease

    Investing.com - Stocks rallied Friday, finishing near their highs for the day, as trade tensions appeared to ease and reports suggested Germany might consider ideas to stimulate its faltering economy.

  • Bet on NVIDIA's Solid Q2 With These ETFs
    Zacks

    Bet on NVIDIA's Solid Q2 With These ETFs

    Nvidia latest result suggests that the business is back on track with a revival in demand for graphics chips and parts used in data centers.

  • Is It Time for Microsoft to Spin Off Skype?
    Motley Fool

    Is It Time for Microsoft to Spin Off Skype?

    With talent and resources going into Teams, it's probably time to re-evaluate Skype's future.

  • US STOCKS-Wall Street extends gains on German stimulus hope
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall Street extends gains on German stimulus hope

    Among stocks, Nvidia Corp jumped 6.2% after posting better-than-expected quarterly profit and revenue, lifting the Philadelphia chip index 2.51%. Applied Materials Inc fell 1.8% after chip gear maker cautioned that recovery in the memory chip market is unlikely before 2020. The S&P 500 bank sub-sector rose 2.51% as rate-sensitive lenders benefited from U.S. Treasury bond yields easing off their lows.

  • ESG Investing: Is Microsoft a Responsible Investment?
    Motley Fool

    ESG Investing: Is Microsoft a Responsible Investment?

    If you’re searching for a feel-good stock, see how Microsoft, the world's largest company, scores on The Motley Fool’s ESG framework.

  • Zacks

    NVIDIA (NVDA) Q2 Earnings and Revenues Surpass Estimates

    Strong growth in automotive revenues boosts NVIDIA's (NVDA) second-quarter fiscal 2020 results. Moreover, sequential improvement across all its end-markets is a tailwind.

  • Motley Fool

    Stock Market News: Applied Materials, NVIDIA Report Mixed Results

    Major benchmarks picked up some ground on Friday morning.

  • Accenture to Acquire Analytics8 to Boost Digital Capabilities
    Zacks

    Accenture to Acquire Analytics8 to Boost Digital Capabilities

    The acquisition is expected to enhance Accenture's (ACN) innovation and digital capabilities and boost its growing applied intelligence business.

  • Here's Why You Should Retain FLEETCOR (FLT) in Your Portfolio
    Zacks

    Here's Why You Should Retain FLEETCOR (FLT) in Your Portfolio

    FLEETCOR (FLT) continues to benefit from organic revenue growth and strategic acquisitions. Higher interest expenses are a major concern.

  • Baystreet

    Stocks Start out Friday on High Note

    Equities in Canada’s largest centre rose at open on Friday, helped by gains in technology stocks, as ...

  • US STOCKS-Wall Street climbs at end of turbulent week
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall Street climbs at end of turbulent week

    Investors are also expecting further interest rate cuts from the Federal Reserve and moves by the European Central Bank next month to fight softening growth. Among stocks, Nvidia Corp jumped 8.3% after posting better-than-expected quarterly profit and revenue, lifting the Philadelphia chip index by 2.23%. The S&P 500 bank sub-sector rose 0.98% as rate-sensitive lenders benefited from U.S. Treasury bond yields easing off their lows.