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The Autonomous Car

The Autonomous Car

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This basket consists of stocks expected to benefit from self-driving cars.

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  • High expectations for Tesla, and a long way to go to match rivals' steady profit
    Reuters

    High expectations for Tesla, and a long way to go to match rivals' steady profit

    Tesla's quarterly report could be another wild ride for investors. The electric carmaker's stock has more than doubled since Tesla's previous quarterly report on October 23, when it posted a surprise profit that was viewed as a milestone for the company.

  • These Are the Fastest-Growing Business Apps
    Bloomberg

    These Are the Fastest-Growing Business Apps

    (Bloomberg) -- Snowflake Inc.’s database software has emerged in an annual report as the fastest-growing cloud-based software program, signaling strong corporate demand for modern tools to help analyze data.Snowflake’s use among clients more than tripled in 2019, software maker Okta Inc. said Tuesday in its annual Businesses @ Work report, which tracks the popularity of corporate software. Atlassian Corp.’s Opsgenie tool took the No. 2 spot as fastest-growing, with a gain of 194%. Alphabet Inc.’s Google Cloud came in third place and Splunk Inc. in fourth.The cloud applications market generated $121 billion of revenue in 2018, according to research firm IDC. The infrastructure market, where Google Cloud competes, produced $36 billion in annual revenue, the firm said.Snowflake makes cloud-based data warehouses, a type of database that compiles information from various sources so it can be analyzed. The company competes against Amazon.com Inc.’s cloud division and database stalwarts such as Oracle Corp. The San Mateo, California-based startup is considering going public, although the chief executive officer has said the the earliest the company could be ready for such a move would be this summer.Opsgenie makes incident management software that notifies workers about critical issues to reduce or avoid service downtime. Todd McKinnon, the chief executive officer of Okta, said the types of software on the list represent a departure from the traditional business applications that topped the survey in previous years, such as office communications platform Slack Technologies Inc. and videoconferencing company Zoom Video Communications Inc.“This was the first year where the fastest-growing things were infrastructure tools or security tools,” McKinnon said in an interview. “It’s a natural coming of age. We’ve put a bunch of apps in place. Now you have to make sure they’re secure, that users aren’t being phished, that you’re using the data in those apps for insights.”The most popular corporate apps overall, by unique monthly active users, are Microsoft Corp.’s Office 365, Workday Inc. and ServiceNow Inc. Google’s G Suite and Salesforce.com Inc. round out the top five.Increasingly, corporate developer teams are buying work tools independent of their IT organizations. The most popular developer software is the Atlassian Product Suite, Okta said. It was followed by Microsoft Corp.’s GitHub, PagerDuty Inc., New Relic Inc., and the newly public Datadog Inc.Okta crunches these numbers based on data from its 7,500 customers, which use the software to securely log into various tech systems. The report presents and analyzes data from Nov. 1, 2018, to Oct. 31, 2019.(Updates with additional details in eighth paragraph. An earlier version of this story corrected the full name of Snowflake Inc. in the first paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • PACCAR (PCAR) Q4 Earnings & Revenues Top Estimates, Down Y/Y
    Zacks

    PACCAR (PCAR) Q4 Earnings & Revenues Top Estimates, Down Y/Y

    PACCAR (PCAR) projects capital expenditures, and research and development expenses at $625-$675 million and $310-$340 million, respectively, for the current year.

  • Facebook's First Human Rights Chief Confronts Its Past Sins
    Bloomberg

    Facebook's First Human Rights Chief Confronts Its Past Sins

    (Bloomberg) -- In July, Facebook Inc. quietly hired Miranda Sissons, a 49-year old human rights activist whose previous work has included stints at the Australian diplomatic service and the International Center for Transitional Justice. The hiring, which was never formally announced, is part of a broader effort by the company to atone for more than once failing to stop online abuse on Facebook from spilling over into real-world violence. Human rights advocates in places like Sri Lanka, the Philippines, India and Brazil have long complained that the company has refused to acknowledge mounting evidence about the dangers of digital hate. As Facebook pursued world-changing growth, particularly in developing countries, it didn’t always have local staff there, or even employees who spoke the language. In Myanmar, a wave of online hate preceded a campaign of violence against the country’s Rohingya minority that led to thousands of deaths and the displacement of over 700,000 people. An independent report Facebook commissioned in 2018 found that it bore partial responsibility for fueling the conflict. Immediately after taking the job, Sissons took a five-day trip to the country. “I was deeply, deeply aware of the criticism of Facebook’s inaction in Myanmar, and deeply aware of the struggles humankind is facing with the impact of social media,” Sissons told Bloomberg News earlier this month in her first press interview in her new role. “This is one of the greatest challenges of our time.”Sissons work is part of a broader reckoning within the technology industry, which has been forced to reexamine its role in world conflicts. Several months before Facebook hired Sissons, Twitter Inc. brought on Cynthia Wong, a former researcher at Human Rights Watch, to be its human rights director. As with Facebook, Twitter never announced the hiring. In discussions with more than a dozen people familiar with Facebook’s work on human rights, a picture emerges of a company that has been moving rapidly but, according to its skeptics, not always effectively. One Facebook employee, who asked not to be identified discussing private information, said its shortcomings have not always been the result of having too few people dedicated to human rights, but at times having so many people involved that they’re working at cross-purposes. Human rights advocates outside the company acknowledge Facebook’s effort to hire experts, and say it has become far more responsive. But they worry that internal advocates like Sissons won’t be adequately empowered, and many are withholding praise until the company makes more concrete changes. “They are hiring people who have the right knowledge, experience and sensibility to tackle human rights problems,” said Matthew Smith, chief executive of Fortify Rights, a human rights group. “So far, though, that’s clearly not enough.”  Sissons’ human rights education started early. Her father was a prominent Australian historian who served in the occupation force of Hiroshima after World War II, then worked as an interpreter in the Australian-led tribunals of Japanese officials accused of war crimes. “My early childhood was completely taken up with discussions of war crimes, war criminals, the Second World War, and notions of justice,” she said.After attending the University of Melbourne, Sissons spent time in East Timor, researched Middle Eastern issues and took several posts with the Australian diplomatic corps, including a frustrating stint answering phones at an Australian embassy in Egypt. “My Arabic wasn’t very good,” she confessed. “People would ring me up and shout at me about all kinds of things, and I would have to find a solution. ” Eventually, Sissons went on to work on her own high-profile tribunal as an independent observer of the trial of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, and she did stints at Human Rights Watch and the Australian diplomatic corps. In 2011 Sissons switched her focus to the relationship between human rights and technology. She had been working in the Middle East, where the Arab Spring was just getting underway, and many people believed social media could shift the balance of power between citizens and oppressive regimes. It was a time of unmatched optimism about the potential of social media in political organizing.The good feelings didn't last. As early as 2014 there were credible reports emerging of coordinated incitement on Facebook against the Rohingya in Myanmar. The online abuse foreshadowed a wave of violence that began in earnest in 2016.By the time Facebook began looking for a human rights director in 2018, the conventional wisdom on tech from a few years earlier had effectively reversed. The killings in Myanmar and elsewhere, coupled with Russian-led disinformation campaigns in Donald Trump’s presidential election, had darkened popular opinion. Companies that were accustomed to being revered were suddenly being accused of simultaneously squelching free expression and tolerating active manipulation of their platforms.The tech industry’s first halting steps to control the flow of abuse initially won few fans. In an online essay in late 2018 Cynthia Wong, then senior internet researcher for Human Rights Watch, said it was time for a “moral reckoning” in Silicon Valley. “If regulators, investors, and users want true accountability, they should press for a far more radical re-examination of tech sector business models, especially social media and advertising ecosystems,” she wrote. In some cases, the companies started hiring their critics. Twitter brought on Wong as its legal director of human rights in April 2019. The company declined to make her available for an interview, and said in a statement that it was “uniquely positioned to help activist and civic-minded people around the globe make their voices heard." Other attempts at reform were wholly unsuccessful. In early 2019 Ross LaJeunesse, then Google’s global head of international relations, saw Facebook’s posting for a human rights director, and used it to argue for the creation of a similar structure at his company. He failed, and left the company soon after. LaJeunesse, who is currently running for the U.S. Senate in Maine, now says tech companies can’t handle these issues on their own. “There has to be government oversight,” he said. Sissons, who reports to Facebook’s head of global policy management Monika Bickert, has over the last several months been quietly incorporating human rights protections into Facebook’s policies, and making sure that people with human rights training are in the meetings where executives sign off on new product features. She said the company had made progress before she arrived, including the reform of its 2018 decision to begin removing misinformation in situations where it could lead to physical harm.“There are now a lot of resources in place,” Sissons said. The challenge is to quickly identify local signs of trouble, then block or slow the spread of certain content, or take swift action against particular users. “We are testing continuously in crisis environments to try and predict what resources we’ll need,” she said, “and to ensure they’re in place.” When Sissons went to Myanmar with Facebook she made a stop in Phandeeyar, a tech hub and community center in downtown Yangon. Jes Kaliebe Petersen, its CEO, said he’s been meeting with Facebook employees for years—he helped the company develop local community standards almost five years ago. But the encounters have calcified into a depressingly predictable routine. “They send a bunch of people who have never been here before, and they talk to us,” said Petersen. “And we never hear from them again.” A spokesman for Facebook said it has held many introductory meetings at the request of local advocates, and argued the company has taken significant strides in the country. Besides hiring Sissons, it shut down hundreds of pages and accounts, including that of the head of Myanmar’s army, for spreading misinformation and hatred. It has hired a Myanmar head of public policy for the first time. And it assembled a team of 100 content moderators who speak Burmese. That group will be able to “support escalations” in other languages used in the country as well, Sissons said.The company also set up an independent review board for thorny content moderation issues, and in an unusual step, commissioned independent human rights assessments of what happened in Myanmar and other trouble spots. In November 2018, it published a 60-page report on Myanmar from the nonprofit group Business for Social Responsibility, in full. “They deserve praise for putting it out there,” said Dunstan Allison-Hope the lead author of the report. “You don’t see that.” But Facebook has never made the results of a similar assessment in Sri Lanka public, despite calls to do so. Sissons declined to say whether it had plans to publish those results. And there are currently no Facebook staff members working in Myanmar full-time—something that many advocates have called for. Representatives for Facebook say its staff based in Singapore and elsewhere are regularly in Myanmar, and that it has spent well over a year taking hundreds of meetings with people in the country. One person who said he'd never gotten an invitation to meet with Facebook is Nickey Diamond, a local advocate working for Fortify Rights. Diamond said he has been the target of harassing posts from the government for years, and still faces a menacing atmosphere online. “They’re sharing my picture with the word ‘traitor’ in Burmese,” he said. “Every human rights defender is in the same situation.”  The broader problem Facebook is confronting—the vigilant monitoring of an ever-evolving social network used by 2.3 billion people—can seem almost impossibly daunting. The company now has content moderators examining posts in approximately 50 languages, Sissons said, a number that is unchanged from its count last April, and is fewer than half of the languages that Facebook actively supports. Facebook has said only technological improvements can combat problems at scale. It has automated tools that scan for hate speech, as well as image recognition technology monitoring for obscene content regardless of language. About 80% of the posts that Facebook acts on for violating its hate speech policies are now first identified by its automated filters, up from about 24% a year earlier.Soon, the challenges of monitoring the spread of abusive posts could become even more difficult. Facing pressure to increase user privacy, Facebook has prioritized private communications, meaning more content is encrypted so that even the company itself won’t know what it says. In those cases, Sissons said the company is working on tools that will look for patterns associated with problematic content, so it can either remove such messages or impede them from spreading so rapidly. Facebook is aware of the scope of its challenges, said Rebecca MacKinnon, the director of Ranking Digital Rights, an online advocacy group. “Facebook is making an effort to engage. Whether that will make a difference in the real world, we’ll see,” she said. “They’re dealing with some problems that no one knows how to solve.” When Petersen of Phandeeyar met with Sissons last November in Myanmar, he came armed with a handful of suggestions for actions Facebook should take before national elections there, which are expected to take place later this year. While Peterson had been deeply engaged in the specifics for months, Sissons was still just getting her feet under her, and there wasn’t enough time in their hour-long meeting to get much resolution, he said.  “There’s always lots of goals for improvements. Hopefully Miranda has a sound plan for how to get there,” said Petersen. “The thing is, we don’t really have that much time.” (Updates with context on automated content moderation in the 22nd paragraph. An earlier version of this story corrected the dates of Sissons' hiring and trip to Myanmar.)To contact the author of this story: Joshua Brustein in New York at jbrustein@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Elon’s Encore: Predicting the Surprises Tesla Has in Store Next

    (Bloomberg) -- When Tesla Inc. reports earnings Wednesday, Elon Musk will be trying for a repeat performance.The electric-car maker’s shares have been on an unprecedented ascent since the chief executive officer crammed his last release with positive updates. Tesla didn’t just blow earnings estimates out of the water, returning to profitability faster than Wall Street was expecting. Musk also reported being ahead of schedule opening a China plant and bringing out the Model Y crossover, kicking off a rally that’s been buoyed since then by record deliveries.Tesla will have to clear a higher bar this time. Analysts are expecting an adjusted profit of $1.74 a share for the fourth quarter, a little short of what the company earned both in the prior three months and year-ago period. But there are several levers Musk, 48, could pull to support the stock, which has climbed 33% already this year and 119% since he last reported results.Model YIn the months since Musk said the Model Y would be ready to launch this summer, sleuths have spotted prototypes in warm- and cold-weather states, spurring speculation that production could begin even sooner.The Model Y also has shown up on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s database for tracking vehicle identification numbers, or VINs. The Performance AWD version of the crossover also has appeared on a California Air Resources Board site that hints at driving range.If Model Y deliveries are imminent, it will be another indication Tesla has turned a corner. Musk predicted during the last earnings call that the vehicle will outsell the S, X and 3 combined, without giving a time frame. While the CEO has a tendency to over-hype, SUVs are hot worldwide, so it’s not outlandish to expect the Model Y to catch on quickly. One bull has predicted it could carry the company to at least 550,000 total deliveries this year, from 367,500 in 2019.AutopilotIn October, Musk said Tesla was pushing to release a beefed-up version of a feature within its suite of driver-assistance technologies branded Autopilot. He expected a more advanced mode Tesla bills as “Full Self Driving” would be available for limited release to people who paid extra to get early access to certain software updates.Musk described a “feature-complete” version of the system that would enable Tesla cars to drive passengers from their house to work, “most likely without interventions,” though the driver would still need to supervise.If Musk pulled this off, it could generate more than just bragging rights, which brings us to the next trick Tesla could have up its sleeve.Deferred RevenueEarnings improved in the last quarter in part because the company recognized about $30 million of deferred revenue based on Musk releasing Smart Summon, a controversial addition to the Autopilot suite. The feature allows Tesla owners to tap their smartphone and remotely call their car to drive itself from elsewhere in a parking lot.Musk has been charging customers for performance features before Tesla’s vehicles are actually capable and socking away that revenue to be recognized later. At the end of September, the company said it expected to cash in on $662 million of deferred revenue in the following 12 months.Regulatory CreditsAnother revenue source Tesla can tap into that’s difficult for analysts to model for are the regulatory credits the company can sell to other automakers that need them to comply with emissions standards.Tesla generated $461 million in revenue from these credits in the first nine months of 2019, up 42% from the year-earlier period. Analysts expect this business to take off in the years to come, since Europe and China are making their car-pollution rules stricter.Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV reached a deal last year to pool its fleet with Tesla’s in Europe. The amount of money Fiat Chrysler has said it will fork over—about $2 billion through 2023—will effectively fund the cost of the new factory Musk plans to open near Berlin, Ben Kallo, an analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co., wrote in a report earlier this month.ChinaChina was a source of much optimism for Tesla toward the end of the year, with the company handing over the first Model 3s assembled at its new factory near Shanghai to local employees. Deliveries to the public started the first week of January and was a dance-worthy occasion.The coronavirus that’s claimed the lives of at least 100 people in China’s Hubei province has sent markets tumbling and raised concern about exacerbating the nation’s auto-sales slump. Electric vehicles could be hit particularly hard since demand has been concentrated in major cities, Robin Zhu, a Bernstein analyst, warned in a report Monday.The public-health crisis casts a cloud over a promising story Musk could still shed more light on, focusing on the longer term. As of the end of last year, only about 30% of the parts being used to build Model 3s near Shanghai were sourced locally.  The goal is for that number to reach 100% by the end of the year, reducing the company's costs and enabling Tesla to keep lowering prices and increasing sales.(Updates earnings per share consensus estimate in third paragraph)To contact the authors of this story: Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.netDavid Welch in Southfield at dwelch12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple’s Earnings Under The Radar: Tesla Shares on Standby
    FX Empire

    Apple’s Earnings Under The Radar: Tesla Shares on Standby

    Apple Inc. is perhaps the world’s most recognizable consumer technology brand with a stock market valuation beyond $1 trillion.

  • Bloomberg

    We Think Because We Act

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- We tend to think of language as the driver of thought, but what if it is something older? Motion has been a part of human thought ever since we could walk upright, if not before. Our Masters in Business guest this week, Barbara Tversky, professor of experimental psychology at Stanford and Columbia University, believes action is the key factor driving human cognitive development. The author of more than 200 research papers, her new book is "Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought."Tversky’s research focuses on visual-spatial reasoning and collaborative cognition. She discusses the interplay of mind and body in enabling cognition. Consider gesture as an example. Tversky argues that gesturing is more than just a by-product of speech: it literally helps us to think. An experiment in her book is to try to explain out loud how to get from your house to the supermarket, train station, your office or school while you sit on your hands. It turns out to be very difficult. Without gesture, speaking is difficult, and we occasionally can’t find the words.Tversky was married to the deceased psychologist Amos Tversky, and helped Michael Lewis do his research for his book on Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, "The Undoing Project."Her favorite books can be seen here.You can stream/download the full conversation, including the podcast extras on Apple iTunes, Overcast, Spotify, Google, Bloomberg and Stitcher. All of our earlier podcasts on your favorite pod hosts can be found here.Next week, we speak with Chris Davis, chairman and chief executive officer of Davis Selected Advisors LP, with more than $25 billion under management. Davis is also on the board of Coca Cola and is vice chairman of the American Museum of Natural History.To contact the author of this story: Barry Ritholtz at britholtz3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is chairman and chief investment officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management, and was previously chief market strategist at Maxim Group. He is the author of “Bailout Nation.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Google’s App Choice Screen Still Favors Google, Rival Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Google’s response to a European Union order to give rival search apps a foothold on its Android phones may fail to steer users to alternatives, warned U.S. upstart DuckDuckGo, the only competitor to win the right to appear as another search option on new handsets across Europe.Google has to prompt users to pick alternative search and web browser apps under the terms of a 2018 EU antitrust ruling that found the company unfairly ties moneymaking services to the Android software it gives away.It chose to set up an auction format for smaller rivals where they will pay to appear as a one of three non-Google options on the choice screen across Europe from March to June.But the user experience of the screens “is designed in a way that is subconsciously influencing people to use Google more than they otherwise should or would like to,” Gabriel Weinberg, chief executive officer of DuckDuckGo, a U.S. search engine that says it doesn’t track users, said in a phone interview.“Ultimately it will not be effective if it remains like that, if only because the auction format will push out a private option and that is the number one thing besides Google that people want to select,” he said.Non-Google OptionsThe auction will be re-run every three months. DuckDuckGo and Google are the only search apps that will appear on the choice screens in 31 countries in the region.Users trying to set up their phones will be shown a choice of four search engines, without much explanation of the apps or the possibility to change their choice later, DuckDuckGo said in a separate blog post on Tuesday.By passing up other ways of designing the prompts that could draw users to non-Google options, DuckDuckGo said Google is potentially undermining the EU order’s aim to widen alternatives to its apps.Google declined to comment, referring to a detailed January blog post where it said the “choice screen design was developed in consultation with the European Commission.”The commission’s press office said regulators “will continue monitoring closely the implementation of the choice screen mechanism” which comes after discussions with Google and feedback from other companies “in particular in relation to the presentation and mechanics of the choice scree and to the selection mechanism of rival search providers.”Choice Screen“As regards DuckDuckGo, as a result of the choice screen mechanism, they will be on every new Android device in the European Economic Area, and it will be for consumers to choose which search engine to install and use,“ the EU said in an emailed statement. The EU’s Android decision also allows rival search engines to be pre-installed on phone and tablets which “was not possible before.”Weinberg said DuckDuckGo has discussed its concerns with the European Commission.’Margrethe Vestager, the EU’s competition commissioner, told reporters on Monday that she’s “very very closely” following Google’s efforts to comply with the order. She said she’s aware of the detail of the design, adding that officials were “doubting if people would use unlimited scroll” to show a large number of alternatives.Prices rivals must pay Google to appear on the screen “came down quite dramatically in the latest auction,” she said.The EU has never formally signed off on how Google opted to comply with the order, leaving it uncertain whether the company has done enough to avoid more fines. Regulators could seek further changes to the choice screen from Google if necessary.Google’s Chrome browser partly owes its own initial surge in popularity to choice screens that Microsoft Corp. agreed to show under EU pressure to offer people an alternative to the browser it loaded on to new personal computers with its Windows software.Microsoft’s screen “wasn’t limited in choice and had 12 different browsers” and “most or all of the elements that we are suggesting here,” Weinberg said.(Update with Google and European Commission comment from ninth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Natalia Drozdiak.To contact the reporter on this story: Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Chapman at pchapman10@bloomberg.net, Nate LanxonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla: Sell On The Trumpets
    Oilprice.com

    Tesla: Sell On The Trumpets

    Tesla’s share price has skyrocketed in recent weeks, but after a parabolic rise, the fall back to earth could be miserable

  • Harley-Davidson (HOG) Q4 Earnings Top, Sales Lag Estimates
    Zacks

    Harley-Davidson (HOG) Q4 Earnings Top, Sales Lag Estimates

    Higher-than-expected motorcycle sales in the Asia Pacific region and operational efficiency buoy Harley-Davidson's (HOG) Q4 earnings.

  • BorgWarner to Buy Delphi for $1.5 Billion in Auto-Parts Deal
    Bloomberg

    BorgWarner to Buy Delphi for $1.5 Billion in Auto-Parts Deal

    (Bloomberg) -- BorgWarner Inc. agreed to acquire Delphi Technologies Plc for about $1.5 billion in an all-stock deal that unites two auto suppliers positioning for the industry’s transformational shift to hybrid and electric vehicles.The deal values Delphi Technologies at about $3.3 billion including debt, according to a statement Tuesday. Its shares surged a record 66% to $16.30, the highest intraday since September. BorgWarner plunged as much as 8.4% to $35.14, the lowest since October.Both BorgWarner and Delphi’s engine and transmission businesses are expected to enter a period of decline as carmakers consolidate and pivot to electric cars. The suppliers have been investing in products automakers will need for hybrid models that use both gasoline engines and battery power, as well as fully electric vehicles.“This could be the beginning of powertrain consolidation, which is coming out of necessity,” Chris McNally, an analyst with Evercore ISI, said before the announcement. “All the suppliers are dealing with lower global volumes combined with the transition toward electric vehicles, which requires heavy investment.”Deal TermsDelphi Technologies stockholders will receive 0.4534 BorgWarner shares for each Delphi Technologies share held. That would represent a premium of about 77% to Delphi Technologies’ closing price Monday.BorgWarner stockholders would own about 84% of the combined company, while current Delphi Technologies owners would hold 16%, according to the statement. The companies said they see cost savings of about $125 million by 2023.The announcement by BorgWarner confirmed an earlier report by Bloomberg News. The deal is the Auburn Hills, Michigan-based company’s biggest acquisition to date, surpassing its purchase of Remy International Inc. for about $950 million in 2015, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.BorgWarner’s biggest customers are Ford Motor Co. and Volkswagen AG, while Delphi Technologies’ are Daimler AG and General Motors Co., according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Evercore’s McNally called the deal a “life raft” for an industry in evolution and said their portfolios are more complementary than significantly overlapping.Delphi’s SplitForced by governments around the world to improve fuel efficiency and cut emissions, automakers are turning to smaller, lighter engines and electrifying their lineups. The industry has also been hit by sluggish economic growth and the U.S. trade war with China.Delphi Technologies, based in Gillingham, England, was one of two companies to split from Delphi Automotive in 2017. The other was Aptiv Plc, focused on new technology like advanced safety systems and self-driving car software. The split left the smaller Delphi Technologies to focus on supplying engine and transmission parts.Delphi was the world’s largest parts maker when General Motors spun off the company.Bank of America Corp. and Rockefeller Financial LLC advised BorgWarner, while Delphi Technologies worked with Goldman Sachs Group Inc.(Updates with regular trading in second paragraph)\--With assistance from Bloomberg Data's Yukari Chilnik.To contact the reporters on this story: Ed Hammond in New York at ehammond12@bloomberg.net;David Welch in Southfield at dwelch12@bloomberg.net;Aaron Kirchfeld in London at akirchfeld@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Hauck at dhauck1@bloomberg.net, Ben Scent, Anthony PalazzoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 5 Auto Stocks Poised to Beat Estimates This Earnings Season
    Zacks

    5 Auto Stocks Poised to Beat Estimates This Earnings Season

    Despite macro-economic and industrial challenges for the Auto Sector, these five stocks are poised to beat estimates this earnings season.

  • General Motors to Invest $3B to Produce All-Electric Vehicles
    Zacks

    General Motors to Invest $3B to Produce All-Electric Vehicles

    General Motors (GM) will spend $2.2 billion at its Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant, while the remaining $800 million will be used in supplier tooling and other projects.

  • Why Tesla (TSLA) Might Surprise This Earnings Season
    Zacks

    Why Tesla (TSLA) Might Surprise This Earnings Season

    Tesla (TSLA) is seeing favorable earnings estimate revision activity and has a positive Zacks Earnings ESP heading into earnings.

  • Google Tops Green-Energy Buys, BlackRock Seen Jogging New Growth
    Bloomberg

    Google Tops Green-Energy Buys, BlackRock Seen Jogging New Growth

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. tech giants including Alphabet Inc.’s Google led the way as corporations raised the amount of clean energy they bought in 2019 by about 40%. Moving forward, peer pressure by asset managers led by BlackRock Inc. could boost it even more.Corporations and public institutions globally acquired a record 19.5 gigawatts of clean energy through long-term power-supply agreements in 2019, easily beating a record set in 2018, according to a report Tuesday by BloombergNEF. Google topped the list with contracts for more than 2.7 gigawatts, roughly equaling the power of three nuclear reactors.In a letter to CEOs this month, BlackRock Chief Executive Larry Fink said his firm, with $7.4 trillion in assets under management, would prioritize climate change as a “defining factor in companies’ long-term prospects” and that a global climate emergency might upend business sooner than expected.“When investors like BlackRock make commitments, everyone below them doesn’t have a choice but to follow,” Kyle Harrison, the report’s lead author, said in an interview. At the same time, he said a wide range of companies are now “getting pressure from their investors, employees and from companies within their supply chain.”While tech companies dominated clean-energy procurement, a growing number of oil and gas companies are signing deals, including Occidental Petroleum Corp., Chevron Corp. and Energy Transfer Partners LP.The U.S. wasn’t the only growing market for power-supply agreements in 2019. Europe, the Middle East and Africa all had record years in 2019, according to the BloombergNEF report. In Latin America, which recorded three-fold growth, Brazil and Chile have emerged as top markets.“Corporations have purchased over 50GW of clean energy since 2008,” Jonas Rooze, lead sustainability analyst at BNEF, said in statement. “That is bigger than the power generation fleets of markets like Vietnam and Poland.”To contact the reporters on this story: Natalia Kniazhevich in New York at nkniazhevic2@bloomberg.net;Brian Eckhouse in New York at beckhouse@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Ryan at jryan173@bloomberg.net, Reg Gale, Joe CarrollFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is 2020 the Year of Space Tourism? 3 Stocks in Focus
    Zacks

    Is 2020 the Year of Space Tourism? 3 Stocks in Focus

    Given the successful trials and developments in the space tourism industry, we have shortlisted three stocks that must be kept an eye on.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Tesla, Facebook and Amazon.com
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Tesla, Facebook and Amazon.com

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Tesla, Facebook and Amazon.com

  • Reuters

    BorgWarner to buy Delphi Technologies in $3.3 billion auto parts deal

    The acquisition, BorgWarner's biggest merger in at least a decade, will add Delphi's expertise in power electronics and expand its own portfolio as the auto industry makes a wider range of vehicles that focus on clean technology. Both companies specialize in auto transmissions, but BorgWarner - the larger of the two with annual revenue of more than $10 billion, has been expanding its products for electric vehicles. Some of BorgWarner's other products include electric motors, battery heaters and onboard battery chargers.

  • Wise Up, Stock Analysts. Tesla Is the Real Deal.
    Bloomberg

    Wise Up, Stock Analysts. Tesla Is the Real Deal.

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The greatest shakeup in automobile history reordered the stock market this month when a minnow grew larger than a whale.Tesla Inc., the 17-year-old Palo Alto maker of battery-powered, zero-emission vehicles, is now the second-largest automaker measured by market capitalization, overtaking No. 2 Volkswagen with a value of $101 billion. It wasn’t long ago that no industry analyst would have predicted that the 82-year-old Wolfsburg, Germany-based seller of 30 times as many vehicles last year would become an also-ran to Tesla. Most of them remain unconvinced that Tesla is worth its price of $558 a share and less than 32% recommend buying the stock, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.But Tesla customers and investors are making the case that the reliance on the internal combustion engine by Volkswagen — and by the 39 other major automakers committed to a commercial fossil fuel machine invented in the 19th century — is a dubious strategy. Tesla is worth $131 billion less than No. 1 Toyota Motor Corp., but its sales growth has been more than nine times the industry average during the past decade and 832 times Toyota's 25% appreciation since Tesla became a public company in June 2010 with an initial valuation of $2 billion.  It opened its largest service center in Germany last year and agreed in December to build its first European car factory, in the state of Brandenburg.All of which explains why Tesla has been poised to catch Volkswagen in the stock market since 2014. That’s when U.S. regulators confirmed that Volkswagen equipped more than 10 million vehicles worldwide with software to defeat emissions tests, an existential moment for the industry. The global sales leader in effect revealed that growth depended on making cleaner vehicles, and that it would cheat if necessary to stay ahead.Volkswagen subsequently admitted that it had conspired to violate the U.S. Clean Air Act and paid a $4.3 billion fine. Several senior executives were sentenced to prison and former Volkswagen Chief Executive Officer Martin Winterkorn and six other Volkswagen executives were eventually criminally charged by German prosecutors.Volkswagen still is beloved by industry analysts, 86% of whom favor the German automaker with a “buy” recommendation, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Volkswagen now wants to emulate Tesla and recently raised its battery electric production target to 1.5 million vehicles in 2025. Tesla sold a record 367,500 vehicles in 2019.“The time of the traditional car manufacturers is over,” said CEO Herbert Diess in prepared remarks at an internal Volkswagen meeting this month. “The magnitude of our task and the brevity of time” necessitated by Tesla's challenge “gives us exactly one single try,” he said. Diess, who was a member of the management board at Bayerische Motoren Werke AG before he joined Volkswagen as chairman and CEO in 2015, should know. As recently as 2013, Volkswagen's $109 billion valuation was seven times more than Tesla's. By 2015, the gap had narrowed to $22 billion and was just $10 billion after the first week of January. During this period, the average 5-year and 3-year returns (income plus appreciation) for the 10 largest automakers were 30% and 28%, respectively. Volkswagen investors suffered by comparison with a loss of 4% and a gain of 20%. Tesla shareholders crushed the industry, earning 181% and 120%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Yet too few analysts agree with Diess's assessment. The Bloomberg Recommendation Consensus shows that the appraisal of Tesla by 36 analysts, measured on a scale of 1 to 5 (the most bullish), has fallen 37% from 4.1 in 2015 to 2.57 when the comparable measure for the Russell 3000 is 4.05. Bloomberg ranks the performance of analysts by calculating the total return of their buy and sell recommendations. The top 10 analysts have a target price for Tesla of $454 a share. The bottom 10 have a target of $397 a share.Ryan Brinkman, the automotive equity research analyst for JPMorgan Chase Bank, is among the biggest Tesla bears, with a target price of $240 a share and a sell rating for the next 12 months. He has issued 28 consecutive sell recommendations since February 2015; Tesla has appreciated 178% since then. During the preceding three years, he initiated 14 “neutral” or hold ratings in a row as the shares were climbing 487%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Colin Rusch, a top-10 performer in the group and the Oppenheimer & Co. analyst who is most bullish on Tesla, said on Jan. 13 that the shares were worth $612, a 59% increase from his $385 target price published Jan. 3. He said the company was a buy on Aug. 2, 2018 and rated the shares a buy even when they lost almost 50% between August 2018 and June 2019. Tesla shareholders who followed Rusch's buy and sell suggestions throughout the past 12 months made 90%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Investors who followed his advice on the 26 stocks he covers reaped a total return of 41% as against the 16% return that would have gone to followers of his top 10 peer group. More than half of Rusch's companies are committed to clean energy rather than being traditional auto stocks.As for Tesla, Rusch is the lonely analyst who agrees with Volkswagen's Diess. “While Tesla has stumbled through growing pains, we believe the company has reached critical scale sufficient to support sustainable positive free cash flow,” Rusch wrote earlier this month.That's another way of saying that the best for Tesla is yet to come.\--With assistance from Shin Pei.To contact the author of this story: Matthew A. Winkler at mwinkler@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jonathan Landman at jlandman4@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Matthew A. Winkler is Co-founder of Bloomberg News (1990) and Editor-in-Chief Emeritus; Bloomberg Opinion Columnist since 2015; Co-founder of Bloomberg Business Journalism Diversity Program in 2017. During his 25 years as Editor-in-Chief, Bloomberg News was a three-time finalist and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting and received numerous George Polk, Gerald Loeb, Overseas Press Club and Society of Professional Journalists and Editors (Sabew) awards.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Megadrill to Build Power Highway Below Stockholm’s Landmarks

    (Bloomberg) -- A drill longer than the city’s tallest skyscraper has been constructed just outside Stockholm to build a tunnel for new power cables needed to meet soaring demand. Elektra, a 240-meter (787 feet) long specially built boring machine weighing more than 1,000 tons, will pierce through the city’s rock of granite and gneiss. Drilling the tunnel rather than the more common method of blasting will create less vibration. It will run below two of the city’s universities, the exclusive Ostermalm neighborhood and the Skeppsholmen island that houses a museum of modern art.The city of about 1 million people is urgently in need of more power capacity. The population is growing by about 40,000 every year. New residential areas are boosting electricity demand, while industrial customers including new server halls, are also increasing consumption. “We’re using more and more power and the power system have to handle new kinds of production and fast changes in the use of electricity,” said Rolf Axen, project manager for the tunnel at grid operator Svenska Kraftnat. “This is one of 50 projects for electrical distribution that is important to sustain the development of the Stockholm region.”The tunnel will be 13.4 kilometers long and will run about 50 to 100 meters below the surface. It will dip underground in Danderyd, one of the city’s most affluent areas, and surface at Hammarby Sjostad, south of the trendy Sodermalm island. The high-voltage cables will connect to already existing sub stations that will help spread the power locally.Elektra will drill about 100 meters per week on average and work is due to start on Feb. 1 and continue for four years. The tunnel itself will be 5 meters in diameter. The parts for the drill arrived in November on about 30 trucks from German manufacturer Herrenknecht AG and has been assembled on site. Elektra will use grippers to advance through the 5-diameter tunnel and will be powered by a long electricity cable. The whole project will be ready by 2027, costing about 3 billion Kronor ($310 million).To contact the author of this story: Lars Paulsson in London at lpaulsson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew Reierson at areierson1@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.