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Romance Industry

Romance Industry

1.34k followers12 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

This basket consists of companies tied to modern and traditional romance in the US.

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  • Sky News

    Breaking Bad movie out in October, but is Walter White going to return?

    The title for the new Breaking Bad film has been revealed, ahead of its arrival on Netflix in October. El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie sees Aaron Paul return as crystal meth cook Jesse Pinkman, who has escaped from a Nazi meth gang and is "coming to terms with his past in order to forge some kind of future", according to the streaming service. It is not clear whether Bryan Cranston will return as Walter White, a chemistry teacher who turns to drug dealing after being diagnosed with lung cancer.

  • Video Streaming: Netflix Faces Fierce Competition
    Market Realist

    Video Streaming: Netflix Faces Fierce Competition

    Competition taking a toll on Netflix as its share of US subscription video streaming market keep falling as rivals gain ground.

  • Why Is Hershey (HSY) Up 4.9% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Hershey (HSY) Up 4.9% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Hershey (HSY) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Bloomberg

    Obama-Backed Film Offers a Sobering Take on U.S.-China Rivalry

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The trade battles between China and the U.S. are often discussed as sterile policy matters. But every so often a tale like “American Factory,” a documentary that debuted on Netflix this week, serves as a reminder that people and complexities are involved.“American Factory,” the first film backed by Barack and Michelle Obama’s new production company, tells the unvarnished story of a shuttered General Motors plant outside Dayton, Ohio, bought and revived as an auto glass factory by China’s Fuyao Glass.The film’s political relevance comes from the fact the new factory opened in October 2016, just weeks before Donald Trump was elected wielding a campaign promise to stunt China’s economic rise that has since turned into a trade war convulsing the global economy. But what makes it compelling is that what begins as an optimistic story of revival ends up as a tangled one about a clash of cultures and the powerful and perplexing forces of globalization and automation.The fact that the first film issued by the Obamas’ new production company as part of a partnership with Netflix is about the economic relationship between two powers struggling to figure out how to co-exist may raise eyebrows among the current team in the White House. At the very least it offers a nuanced counterpoint to Trump’s proclamation that trade wars are “easy to win.”“I think one of the things that makes the movie powerful is the fact that it’s not all black and white. There’s a bunch of gray,” Barack Obama says in a short interview with “American Factory” directors Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar issued with the film.The film is, above all, good at capturing unguarded moments featuring its Chinese characters.Changing Views“The most important thing is not how much money we earn, but how this will change Americans’ view of the Chinese and toward China,” Fuyao’s billionaire chairman, Cao Dewang, tells a group of Chinese workers brought in to help set up the factory a half-hour into the film.Regardless of that proclamation the cultural clash on show is often raw. “They are pretty slow. They have fat fingers,” one Chinese manager complains early on as he leads Cao past a line of American workers.“The Chinese really don’t help us out. They just walk around and tell the Americans what to do,” an American employee complains later as tensions threaten to boil over.During a visit by a small group of American managers to Fuyao’s headquarters in China the camera captures a conversation between a Chinese supervisor and his Chinese-speaking American counterpart from the Dayton factory.“You guys have eight days off every month. You have all the weekends,” the Chinese supervisor complains, pointing out that the workers laboring nearby get only a day or two off per month.American executives and supervisors recruited to run the Ohio plant are eventually replaced with Chinese managers more attuned to Cao’s ruthless demands for efficiency and profit and his bristling at the idea of his workforce becoming unionized.Shortly after he makes the change, Cao offers that he has grown more suspicious of the land he has invested in. “We hired Americans to work as our managers and supervisors. Our expectation was that we could trust them, pay them a high salary and they would serve the company. Why didn’t they? I think they are hostile to Chinese,” he tells the filmmakers.There are heartwarming and even hopeful moments in “American Factory." Rob, a furnace supervisor, invites a dozen Chinese Fuyao employees over for Thanksgiving dinner at his rural home, letting them pose with his guns and giving the brave ones rides on his Harley. “They talked about it forever. That made me happy,” he says.But underlying it all are also harsh economic realities. By the end of the film Rob has been fired for taking too long to call up information on a computer. And the executive leading Cao through a factory being transformed yet again is laying out in cruel detail how and when new robots will be replacing the workers nearby.“This one is being tested now. We’re hoping to cancel four workers in July and August,” he says. “I’ll change that into machine work. We can’t get the work done now. They are too slow.”Which sends another message about the current trade wars. All the tariffs and tussling over soybeans and supply chains may be missing a bigger transformation underway in the global economy. One that, as the film makes clear in its closing frames, is likely to hit both American and Chinese factory workers alike.To contact the reporter on this story: Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Simon Kennedy at skennedy4@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Brendan MurrayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of FLWS earnings conference call or presentation 22-Aug-19 3:00pm GMT

    Q4 2019 1-800-Flowers.Com Inc Earnings Call

  • L Brands Still Can't Fix Its Biggest Problems
    Motley Fool

    L Brands Still Can't Fix Its Biggest Problems

    Victoria’s Secret continues to lose shoppers as Bath & Body Works loses momentum.

  • Is Netflix Losing Its Edge? Stock Continues to Slide
    Market Realist

    Is Netflix Losing Its Edge? Stock Continues to Slide

    Since Netflix posted its Q2 results, its stock has fallen 18%. Could the streaming giant lose its disruptor position as new players enter the market?

  • Vanguard, Capital Research Buy More Netflix Stock
    Market Realist

    Vanguard, Capital Research Buy More Netflix Stock

    The Vanguard Group, Capital Research Global Investors, and BlackRock Institutional Trust all raised their holdings in Netflix stock in the second quarter.

  • What Lowe's Executives Want Investors to Know
    Motley Fool

    What Lowe's Executives Want Investors to Know

    The management team breaks down a second straight quarter of accelerating growth.

  • YUM! Brands' KFC Unveils New Bowl Meal, Eyes Innovation
    Zacks

    YUM! Brands' KFC Unveils New Bowl Meal, Eyes Innovation

    YUM! Brands' (YUM) celebrated brand KFC is set to benefit from the latest introduction of Mac & Cheese Bowls.

  • Motley Fool

    Target Soars 19% On Earnings

    Target's quarterly report was pretty good, and the market gave shareholders a whopper of a reward for it.

  • Is Match Group (NASDAQ:MTCH) A Risky Investment?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Match Group (NASDAQ:MTCH) A Risky Investment?

    David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the...

  • Company News for Aug 23, 2019
    Zacks

    Company News for Aug 23, 2019

    Companies In The News Are: JWN,BJ,LB,DKS

  • Imagine Owning Tiffany (NYSE:TIF) And Wondering If The 34% Share Price Slide Is Justified
    Simply Wall St.

    Imagine Owning Tiffany (NYSE:TIF) And Wondering If The 34% Share Price Slide Is Justified

    Passive investing in an index fund is a good way to ensure your own returns roughly match the overall market. But if...

  • A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of Darden Restaurants, Inc. (NYSE:DRI)
    Simply Wall St.

    A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of Darden Restaurants, Inc. (NYSE:DRI)

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Darden Restaurants, Inc. (NYSE:DRI) by taking...

  • A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of The Hershey Company (NYSE:HSY)
    Simply Wall St.

    A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of The Hershey Company (NYSE:HSY)

    How far off is The Hershey Company (NYSE:HSY) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial data, we'll...

  • Here's Why Netflix's Subscriber Growth Will Rebound in Q3
    Motley Fool

    Here's Why Netflix's Subscriber Growth Will Rebound in Q3

    This isn't the first time the streaming giant has whiffed on subscriber numbers, and it doesn't mean the sky is falling.

  • Why 1-800-Flowers.com Stock Dropped 12% Today
    Motley Fool

    Why 1-800-Flowers.com Stock Dropped 12% Today

    Q4 was no bed of roses for investors.

  • 1-800-Flowers.com Inc (FLWS) Q4 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    1-800-Flowers.com Inc (FLWS) Q4 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

    FLWS earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

  • Motley Fool

    What Happened in the Stock Market Today

    See why Nordstrom popped and L Brands dropped on a mixed day for the broader markets.

  • Stock market news: August 22, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: August 22, 2019

    Stocks were mixed Thursday after the closely watched spread between the yield on the U.S. 10-year bond and 2-year note turned negative yet again. Investors parsed through Fed commentary suggesting a rate cut may not necessarily be the central bank’s next move.

  • Netflix’s Streaming Dominance Is at a Crossroads, New Shows Coming
    Market Realist

    Netflix’s Streaming Dominance Is at a Crossroads, New Shows Coming

    Netflix's streaming dominance will face its biggest test this September. Soaring competition is increasingly becoming a threat in the industry.

  • Hulu and Amazon Prime Video chip away at Netflix's dominance
    TechCrunch

    Hulu and Amazon Prime Video chip away at Netflix's dominance

    Netflix is still the No. 1 subscription streaming service in the U.S., according to a new report from eMarketer, but rivals, including Amazon Prime Video and Hulu, are starting to cut into its market share. The analyst firm forecasts 182.5 million U.S. consumers will subscribe to over-the-top streaming services this year, or 53.3% of the population. Netflix is still the top choice here, with 158.8 million viewers in 2019, and it is continuing to grow.

  • Motley Fool

    Why L Brands Stock Dropped Today

    Comparable sales at Victoria's Secret continue to fall.

  • Motley Fool

    Stock Market News: Tesla/Volkswagen Rumors Fly; L Brands Sales Sag

    The stock market was mixed on Thursday morning.