• Alibaba gets strong demand for IPO - sources
    Reuters Videos

    Alibaba gets strong demand for IPO - sources

    On Monday (November 11) it notched sales of 38 billion dollars in its latest Singles' Day shopping fest. Now Alibaba looks certain to shift 13.4 billion dollars of shares in its upcoming IPO. Sources have told Reuters that order books for the sale have been covered many times over. The e-commerce giant plans to list in Hong Kong on November 26. It's currently marketing the deal to investors around the world. . Sources say an earlier attempt at an IPO was abandoned due to the city's political unrest. This time Alibaba looks certain to press ahead. Not coincidentally, perhaps, the offering will be fully automated and paperless. That avoids the potential publicity nightmare of investors queuing to submit applications as protests rage around them. The share sale will be Hong Kong's biggest this year. Pricing for the shares will be announced on November 20th.

  • How this CBD company created a buzz by 'kind of making fun of millennial culture'
    Yahoo Finance

    How this CBD company created a buzz by 'kind of making fun of millennial culture'

    Ask Benjamin Witte about Recess, and one of the first places he’ll send you is the company’s Instagram page.

  • SINA Corp's (SINA) Q3 Earnings and Revenues Increase Y/Y
    Zacks

    SINA Corp's (SINA) Q3 Earnings and Revenues Increase Y/Y

    SINA Corp's (SINA) third-quarter revenues reflect growth in Weibo advertising and marketing, and non-advertising revenues.

  • Should We Be Delighted With 58.com Inc.'s (NYSE:WUBA) ROE Of 21%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should We Be Delighted With 58.com Inc.'s (NYSE:WUBA) ROE Of 21%?

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

  • Here's Why You Should Hold on to American Public (APEI) Now
    Zacks

    Here's Why You Should Hold on to American Public (APEI) Now

    Strategic initiatives are aiding American Public Education (APEI) to grow further. However, volatile enrollment trend raises a concern.

  • Singles' Day Bonanza a Prelude to Holiday Season: 5 Picks
    Zacks

    Singles' Day Bonanza a Prelude to Holiday Season: 5 Picks

    After a successful Singles' Day, American retailers expect a smashing holiday season.

  • GBP/USD, EUR/GBP, USD/CAD – Little Movement Ahead of U.S. Retail Sales
    FX Empire

    GBP/USD, EUR/GBP, USD/CAD – Little Movement Ahead of U.S. Retail Sales

    The British and Canadian currencies are almost unchanged on Friday. We could see some movement with the release of U.S. retail sales at 13:30 GMT.

  • Siberian taxi firm bringing fare-haggling to Moscow plans expansion
    Reuters

    Siberian taxi firm bringing fare-haggling to Moscow plans expansion

    A Siberian ride-hailing firm that allows customers to haggle over their fares is investing to beef up its presence in Moscow, a market dominated by New York-listed internet giant Yandex and Uber , its founder said. InDriver, which is available in 28 countries chiefly in Central Asia and Latin America, plans to spend up to $10 million over the next two years to expand its presence in the sprawling Russian capital, its head and founder Arsen Tomsky told Reuters. Unlike its competitors that offer fixed rates, inDriver allows customers themselves to propose a fare for their journey.

  • 3 Strong Buys that Crushed Earnings Season
    Zacks

    3 Strong Buys that Crushed Earnings Season

    3 Strong Buys that Crushed Earnings Season

  • Alibaba's $13.4 billion bookbuild covered multiple times - sources
    Reuters

    Alibaba's $13.4 billion bookbuild covered multiple times - sources

    Alibaba's $13.4 billion (£10.5 billion) institutional bookbuild for its Hong Kong listing is already covered "multiple times," according to a message sent to investors and verified by sources with direct knowledge of the matter. The Chinese e-commerce giant plans to list its shares in Hong Kong from November 26 and is currently marketing the deal to investors around the world. Pricing of the stock for institutional shareholders will be set on November 20, a prospectus lodged with the Hong Kong Stock Exchange shows.

  • Market Exclusive

    Market Morning: Alibaba Goes Hong Kong, Uber Dump, Alzheimer’s Hope, Cannabis Collapse

    Alibaba, Now May Not Be the Best Time to IPO in Hong Kong Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) is going public in Hong Kong with a $13.4 billion listing, and it’s putting extra stress on the Hong Kong banking system specifically at a time when the island is on the verge of exploding in cacophonous riots leading to […]The post Market Morning: Alibaba Goes Hong Kong, Uber Dump, Alzheimer's Hope, Cannabis Collapse appeared first on Market Exclusive.

  • The Climate Crisis Is Coming for Your Land Rover
    Bloomberg

    The Climate Crisis Is Coming for Your Land Rover

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- If you’ve dropped the kids off at school in London or the New York suburbs recently, the idea that Jaguar Land Rover Automotive Plc is struggling must seem far-fetched. The British carmaker’s Range Rover SUVs have become a common feature of the upper-middle class lifestyle. How else would one get to brunch and the gym?Yet a decade after India’s Tata Group acquired and dramatically reinvigorated these famous old brands, JLR is back on the ropes. The unit lost an eye-peeling 3.3 billion pounds ($4.2 billion) in the fiscal year to March and burned through 1.3 billion pounds of cash. No wonder Tata is casting around for help.JLR’s cost-base has become bloated, its sales in China have collapsed and its big bet on Jaguar saloon (sedan) models has  failed to pay off. Selling SUVs to Brits and Americans has prevented its fall from being even more dramatic. However, new gasoline and diesel cars are going to be banned in the U.K. and elsewhere by 2040 and the climate crisis could trigger a backlash against gas-guzzlers well before then. Either way, refashioning the company for a zero-emissions future will be very expensive.Tata insists JLR is not for sale but that doesn’t mean it wants to continue this journey alone. The unit had about 2.2 billion pounds of net debt at the end of September.The Indian parent has approached fellow automakers including China’s Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co. and Germany’s BMW AG, about forging partnerships to help JLR save money, Bloomberg reported this week. These would supplement existing collaborations with BMW on electric drive systems and with Waymo on autonomous vehicles.This hunt for allies makes sense because JLR’s business model is looking shaky. More than 80% of the vehicles that it sold in Europe last year run on diesel, a technology that’s been undermined by Volkswagen AG’s emissions cheating and the threat of bans in many cities.SUVs make up an even higher percentage of sales. The boom in these vehicles has contributed to a rise in average carbon emissions from carmakers over the past year or two. No wonder they’re in the cross-hairs of climate campaigners. Last month JLR listed “increasing environmental activism” among its biggest challenges.The Extinction Rebellion crowd has a point here. A top-specification Range Rover can weigh more than 5,700 lbs (2,585kg), which is why the company’s vehicles tend to spew out more CO2 than peers.Because it sells less than 300,000 cars annually in Europe, JLR has special dispensation from Brussels to pollute more.(1) However, these lenient fleet emission targets expire in 2028, so the company needs to change its ways sharpish.It says it’s on track to cut emissions by 45% in 2020 compared to 2007 levels, as required by regulators. From next year there will be a hybrid or electric variant of all of its models; and Jaguar’s all-electric I-Pace compact SUV deservedly won car of the year. Creating zero emissions versions of the group’s biggest SUVS will be more difficult, though, because of their hefty weight and poor aerodynamics.Footing the bill will be a stretch too. The company has to manage a 4 billion pound yearly investment budget while selling far fewer cars than its bigger rivals: JLR sold less than 600,000 vehicles last year, about 5% of Volkswagen’s haul. Lackluster sales have left it with unused production capacity.Its attention to detail in manufacturing has also been found wanting. The Jaguar and Land Rover brands came bottom in J.D. Power’s U.S. new vehicle quality rankings, and high warranty costs are an unwelcome feature of its earnings. All of this means JLR’s profit margins are thinner than you might expect given the $210,000 price tag of a high-spec Range Rover.Even as far out as 2023, JLR anticipates an operating return on sales of 6% at most. This is similar to Daimler AG’s 2022 target for Mercedes-Benz, but is way below the margins of French mass-market carmaker Peugeot SA.Thanks to progress on cost-cutting and signs that plunging China sales have bottomed out, investors have become more confident in Tata’s ability to turn JLR around. It returned to profit in the second quarter, prompting a rally in Tata Motors’ shares and JLR’s beaten up bonds. President Donald Trump’s threat of a 25% U.S. tariff on imported vehicles appears to have receded somewhat, as has the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit that would have been ruinous for carmakers.Might this moment of calm tempt a buyer of the company out of the shadows? Tata’s reluctance to sell isn’t the only barrier. Peugeot was rumored to be keen but its chief executive officer Carlos Tavares has found another merger partner in Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV. Bernstein analyst Max Warburton says BMW would fit but the Bavarians lost a lot of money when they owned Rover in the 1990s.There are also politics to consider. The backlash against SUVs, many built by BMW, is acute in Germany. Doubling down on gas-guzzling urban tractors might harm BMW’s emissions footprint.(2) It might also be viewed poorly by the Berlin government, which boosted electric vehicle subsidies recently.While SUVs can carry lots of baggage, increasingly it’s the wrong kind.(1) JLR's new cars must have average emissions of about 130 g/km of CO2 by 2021, compared to an industry average of 95g.(2) Depending on what happened to JLR's emissions derogationTo contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Explainer: Why is Alibaba listing in Hong Kong?
    Reuters

    Explainer: Why is Alibaba listing in Hong Kong?

    Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba is set to price its first share sale in Hong Kong next week, raising up to $13.4 billion (£10.5 billion) in what will be the largest deal in the city since 2010 and the world's biggest ever cross-border secondary listing. WHY IS ALIBABA LISTING IN HONG KONG? Alibaba, which is due to start trading on Nov. 26 in Hong Kong, could also benefit from Chinese demand.

  • Hong Kong's cash pool tightens as Alibaba primes for $13 billion listing
    Reuters

    Hong Kong's cash pool tightens as Alibaba primes for $13 billion listing

    Alibaba Group's $13.4 billion (£10.5 billion) Hong Kong listing is shrinking cash levels in the protest-wracked financial hub, with short-term borrowing costs shooting back towards a decade-high marked in July. Large IPOs and share sales typically hoover up cash in Hong Kong's relatively small banking system, albeit temporarily. "Timing wise, it's not good for the liquidity to get sucked out of the system as there's a bit of capital outflow happening due to the protests," said a Hong Kong-based senior banker at a European bank, who asked not to be identified.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of VIPS earnings conference call or presentation 13-Nov-19 12:30pm GMT

    Q3 2019 Vipshop Holdings Ltd Earnings Call

  • Alibaba Launches Mega Share Sale With $12 Billion Retail Tag
    Bloomberg

    Alibaba Launches Mega Share Sale With $12 Billion Retail Tag

    (Bloomberg) -- Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. priced the retail portion of its Hong Kong share sale Friday, issuing an appeal to individual investors in a city in the throes of recession after months of violent pro-democracy protests.The largest Chinese e-commerce company capped the 12.5 million shares available to individual investors at HK$188 apiece -- an auspicious number in Chinese culture -- making it the most expensive first-time share sale in Hong Kong. Alibaba said it may price the remainder of its 500 million-share offering above that ceiling, signaling that it aims to raise at least $12 billion in what would be one of the world’s largest sales of stock this year. The company will price the rest of its international offering by Nov. 20.Asia’s largest corporation is proceeding with what could be Hong Kong’s biggest share sale since 2010. Slated for late November, it’ll be the Chinese e-commerce juggernaut’s official Asian coming-out party -- half a decade after snubbing the financial hub for a record Wall Street debut. Alibaba’s return hands a much-needed victory to a city wracked by protests since the summer, and will please Chinese officials who’ve watched many of the country’s largest private corporations flock overseas for capital. If the deal goes through, Alibaba will challenge Tencent Holdings Ltd. for the title of the largest Hong Kong-listed corporation.“The listing in Hong Kong will allow more of the company’s users and stakeholders in the Alibaba digital economy across Asia to invest and participate in Alibaba’s growth,” the company said. “During this time of ongoing change, we continue to believe that the future of Hong Kong remains bright,” Daniel Zhang, chief executive officer of Alibaba, said in a letter to investors.Read more: Alibaba Is Taking Orders for $11 Billion Hong Kong ListingListing closer to home has been a long-time dream of billionaire Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma’s. A successful Hong Kong share sale could help finance a costly war of subsidies with Meituan Dianping in food delivery and travel, and divert investor cash from rivals like Meituan and WeChat operator Tencent. It will also be a feather in the cap for Zhang, who took over as chairman from Ma in September. The former accountant is now spearheading the company’s expansion beyond Asia but also into adjacent markets from cloud computing to entertainment, logistics and physical retail.What Bloomberg Intelligence SaysAlibaba’s secondary listing in Hong Kong could lead to a shake up of the Hang Seng Index, the city’s main stock benchmark. The 50-member index is heavy on financial stocks, when comparing weights to other leading equity indexes in the world. Meanwhile, IT, industrials and consumer discretionary stocks are severely underrepresented.\- Steven Lam, analystClick here for the researchA marquee name like Alibaba’s could draw investors and boost trading liquidity for Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd., which just incurred its biggest profit slump in more than three years. For Hong Kong, it’s bit of welcome news following half a year of often violent protests that have at times paralyzed the city and its service industry. Efforts to court Alibaba emanated from the very top, with Chief Executive Carrie Lam herself exhorting Ma to consider a listing in the city.Alibaba has considered a Hong Kong listing for a long time, Michael Yao, head of corporate finance at Alibaba, said on a call with investors this week. The deal size hasn’t changed as a result of the protests, he added.(Updates with details of price per share comparison in second paragraph)\--With assistance from Zhen Hao Toh.To contact the reporters on this story: Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.net;Alistair Barr in San Francisco at abarr18@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • U.S Retail Sales and Trade Put the Greenback in Focus
    FX Empire

    U.S Retail Sales and Trade Put the Greenback in Focus

    The economic calendar shifts focus to the U.S Dollar. Following Powell’s positive outlook on the economy, retail sales will need to impress…

  • Alibaba gets strong demand for $13.4 billion Hong Kong listing: sources
    Reuters

    Alibaba gets strong demand for $13.4 billion Hong Kong listing: sources

    Alibaba's order books for its $13.4 billion Hong Kong share sale have already been covered "multiple times," sources with direct knowledge of the matter said on Friday, as the ecommerce group kicked off its campaign for the secondary listing in the city gripped by protests. The Chinese e-commerce giant plans to list its shares in Hong Kong from November 26, where it is hoping to raise up to $13.4 billion, and it is marketing the deal to investors around the world. The sources said potential investors had been told that the "quality of demand is high" and that there "continues to be very strong feedback" about the deal.

  • Jack Ma Says U.S.-China Trade Tension Could Last 20 Years
    Bloomberg

    Jack Ma Says U.S.-China Trade Tension Could Last 20 Years

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Jack Ma, the co-founder and former chairman of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., said the U.S.-China relationship could face 20 years of “turbulence” if the two superpowers aren’t careful in how they handle trade.“We have to be very, very careful,” Ma said on Thursday in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “We have to solve problems, we should not create more problems.”While a full-scale trade war might not last that long, relations could end up rocky for the next two decades, he said. Ma emphasized the importance of the two countries working together and sharing technology.The trade dispute, which has been going on for more than a year and a half, has already ensnared more than 70% of bilateral trade in goods. If the two countries can’t resolve at least some of their differences in the coming weeks, the White House on Dec. 15 will add 15% punitive tariffs on $160 billion in Chinese imports. China-based Alibaba, one of Asia’s biggest companies, is expected to ride out the storm better than some, thanks to booming online consumption in the world’s No. 2 economy. But Alibaba saw its stock dip earlier this fall on reports that the Trump administration was weighing a limit on U.S. government pension funds buying Chinese stocks.The internet giant listed shares in New York in 2014, in the biggest ever initial public offering. It’s now readying a share sale in Hong Kong that could raise almost $12 billion. Alibaba’s shares were little changed in New York Thursday at $182.80. They have risen 33% this year.(Updates with shares in final paragraph. An earlier version was corrected to remove a reference to Ma’s reason for Hong Kong listing)To contact the reporters on this story: Kiley Roache in New York at kroache@bloomberg.net;Yinka Ibukun in Accra at yibukun@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Estimating The Fair Value Of Tupperware Brands Corporation (NYSE:TUP)
    Simply Wall St.

    Estimating The Fair Value Of Tupperware Brands Corporation (NYSE:TUP)

    In this article we are going to estimate the intrinsic value of Tupperware Brands Corporation (NYSE:TUP) by taking the...

  • GBP/USD, EUR/GBP, USD/CAD – Limited Movement in the Markets
    FX Empire

    GBP/USD, EUR/GBP, USD/CAD – Limited Movement in the Markets

    GBP/USD has posted slight gains, shrugging off a weak U.K. retail sales report. EUR/GBP and USD/CAD are showing little movement.