• Athletics body to tighten rules after Nike's Vaporfly helps records tumble
    Reuters Videos

    Athletics body to tighten rules after Nike's Vaporfly helps records tumble

    World Athletics are running the rule over whether to tighten regulations over Nike's controversial Vaporfly shoe, which is said to substantially improve performance but has been labeled by some as technological doping. The sports governing body is expected to reveal the results of its investigation by the end of January, and in a statement to Reuters said that "there needs to be greater clarity on what is permissible in elite sport and in competitions." The shoes in question have risen to prominence in recent months after a version were worn by Kenyan runner Eliud Kipchoge, when he became the first man to run a sub-two hour marathon in Vienna last year. Kipchoge is a fan of the shoes and its technology that Nike calls "a built-in secret weapon." Yannis Pitsiladis is a Professor of Sport and Exercise Science at the University of Brighton breaks down just how far ahead the Vaporfly is of its rivals. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PROFESSOR OF SPORT AND EXERCISE SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRIGHTON, PROFESSOR YANNIS PITSILADIS "What we don't want is put a shoe on me or you and you can run almost as fast as an Eliud Kipchoge can with a normal shoe. Nike's own data that they've published now has shown that some individuals, the benefit in economy is up to 6%. And remember, this is individuals that were testing the shoe, they weren't individuals that the shoe was designed for." Other manufacturers have also released, or are developing, their own carbon-insoled shoes to rival the $250 Vaporflys, but they are all playing catch-up in this arms race for feet. In 2008, Speedo delivered its LZR speed suit which helped swimmers claim a host of world records before it was banned. Other technological leaps, such as skinsuits in skiing, hinged blades in speed skating and aero bars and disc wheels in cycling, survived to become standard equipment.

  • Broadcom, Amazon, Uber, SoftBank, Bayer: Companies to Watch
    Yahoo Finance

    Broadcom, Amazon, Uber, SoftBank, Bayer: Companies to Watch

    Broadcom, Amazon, Uber, SoftBank and Bayer are the companies to watch

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of JNJ earnings conference call or presentation 22-Jan-20 1:00pm GMT

    Q4 2019 Johnson & Johnson Earnings Call

  • Bloomberg

    YouTube Gets Streaming Rights to Major Esports Leagues

    (Bloomberg) -- YouTube secured the exclusive rights to broadcast some of the biggest esports leagues, giving Google a boost in its efforts to push into the lucrative world of video games.The deal, signed between Alphabet Inc.’s Google and video game publisher Activision Blizzard Inc., gives YouTube the rights to broadcast the new Call of Duty League and the already-popular Overwatch League, which was broadcast on Amazon.com Inc.’s Twitch for the past two years at a reported cost of $90 million. As part of the agreement, Google will provide cloud infrastructure for Activision’s online games. Financial terms of the multiyear deal were not disclosed.Gaming is a significant new frontier for Google. Last year, it released a game-streaming service called Stadia, which lets people play games through the internet without having to buy a console or high-powered computer. YouTube has always been a major destination for watching people play video games, but the company is trying to take even more territory by poaching well-known game players from Twitch.‘All-Out Talent War’ in Video Gaming Sparked by Ninja Defection“In 2020 Google is going all out to claim a piece of the $120 billion games market,” said Joost van Dreunen, managing director of Nielsen’s video-game research arm. “Google is off to a great start to building strong relationships with content creators which it will need to differentiate as it tries to penetrate the industry via different avenues.”The news isn’t good for Amazon, which hasn’t announced a competitor to Stadia and still faces uncertainty about its in-house gaming studio, van Dreunen said. “The longer Amazon remains on the sidelines of technological shifts in the games business, the harder it will be to capture share down the line,” he said.The deal offers a strong boost to the central thesis of Activision’s esports efforts. The publisher pitched investors on the Overwatch League and the Call of Duty League, which launches later this month, as esports equivalents to traditional sports leagues like the National Basketball Association or National Football League. Selling media rights to companies like YouTube is a central piece of how these leagues make money.Providing hosting services to Activision is also a win for Google’s cloud division, which is trailing Amazon and Microsoft Corp. in that market.(Updates with comment from analyst in the fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Eben Novy-Williams.To contact the reporter on this story: Gerrit De Vynck in New York at gdevynck@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Previewing Tech Sector Earnings
    Zacks

    Previewing Tech Sector Earnings

    Previewing Tech Sector Earnings

  • Bloomberg

    Google’s ‘Wi-Spy’ Accord Gives Consumers Nothing, States Say

    (Bloomberg) -- Attorneys general from nine states urged a federal judge to toss out Google’s $13 million settlement of a class-action lawsuit blaming its Street View mapping technology for a massive violation of consumer privacy.The proposed accord in a debacle that became known as “Wi-Spy” doesn’t offer compensation for millions of people whose confidential data was captured off their Wi-Fi networks by Street View vehicles. Instead, the deal divvies up funds among a handful of privacy rights organizations, a small number of individual consumers who led the case and their lawyers, the state officials said in a court filing.The lawsuit, filed a decade ago, was once called the biggest U.S. wiretap case ever and threatened the internet giant with billions of dollars in damages. The settlement was reached in July and won preliminary approval in October from U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer in San Francisco, who found it to be “likely fair, reasonable, and adequate.”“Without receiving any of the $13 million cash fund or any meaningful injunctive relief, class members receive no direct benefit from the settlement,” the attorneys general said.An attorney for the consumers and Google’s press office didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment.Read More: Why a Dead Kennedys Punk Isn’t Buying Google’s Privacy DealsArizona State Attorney General Mark Brnovich submitted the filing, joined by Alabama, Alaska, Missouri, Ohio, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana and Louisiana. The states plan to urge Breyer to reject the deal at a Feb. 28 final approval hearing in San Francisco.Google agreed in the settlement to delete all collected data and educate people on how to set up encrypted wireless networks. But the company had already made those promises in a 2013 agreement with 39 attorneys general, according to Mark Brnovich’s filing.Any “injunctive relief is illusory,” the attorneys general said.The Street View suit is a rare instance in privacy litigation where consumers gained the upper hand, notably when the U.S. Court of Appeals in San Francisco in 2013 rejected Google’s argument that it was legal to intercept open Wi-Fi networks because they were akin to AM/FM radio transmissions. The court’s conclusion that the federal Wiretap Act applied meant that if Google went to trial to fight the allegations and lost, it could be hit with $10,000 in damages for every violation.But in July, the plaintiffs’ lawyers said the settlement was justified, in part, because there was a risk that they could still lose the case -- and end up with nothing. They also argued that the accord would deter privacy violations and that the funds designated for privacy-oriented groups will help teach future information technology workers to “to become safeguards of internet privacy rather than exploiters of personal information communicated over the internet.”The case is In re: Google Inc. Street View Electronic Communications, 3:10-md-02184, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California (San Francisco).To contact the reporter on this story: Malathi Nayak in San Francisco at mnayak21@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter Blumberg, Joe SchneiderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • US STOCKS-Wall Street set for weekly loss on gathering virus fears
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall Street set for weekly loss on gathering virus fears

    Wall Street lost ground on Friday as mounting worries over the scope of the coronavirus outbreak overshadowed positive corporate earnings. All three major U.S. stock averages extended their losses after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the second case of the virus on U.S. soil, this time in Chicago. For the holiday-shortened week, all three indexes are on course to post a decline with the Nasdaq set to snap a six-week winning streak.

  • Bear of the Day: Dell Technologies (DELL)
    Zacks

    Bear of the Day: Dell Technologies (DELL)

    Bear of the Day: Dell Technologies (DELL)

  • What Makes Apple (AAPL) a Strong Momentum Stock: Buy Now?
    Zacks

    What Makes Apple (AAPL) a Strong Momentum Stock: Buy Now?

    Does Apple (AAPL) have what it takes to be a top stock pick for momentum investors? Let's find out.

  • Top Stock Research Reports for Intel, Boeing & Blackstone
    Zacks

    Top Stock Research Reports for Intel, Boeing & Blackstone

    Top Stock Research Reports for Intel, Boeing & Blackstone

  • US STOCKS-Wall St slides on coronavirus fears, Intel limits losses
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall St slides on coronavirus fears, Intel limits losses

    U.S. stocks fell on Friday amid renewed concerns over the spreading of a coronavirus outbreak from China, offsetting strong gains for Intel. Airlines and travel stocks fell again, with United Airlines Holdings Inc and American Airlines Group Inc shedding about 4%. "It has taken the wind out of the market, because for now other than (Intel and American Express) we have stocks coming under some selling pressure," said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Spartan Capital Securities in New York.

  • US STOCKS-Wall St bogged down by China virus fears, Intel limits losses
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall St bogged down by China virus fears, Intel limits losses

    Wall Street came under pressure on Friday as investors sold energy, financial and healthcare stocks on mounting fears over the coronavirus outbreak in China, while strong gains for chipmaker Intel limited losses on the main indexes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said a traveler from Wuhan, China had been diagnosed with the coronavirus in Chicago, Illinois, making it the second confirmed case of the virus in the country. The virus outbreak in China has killed 26 people and infected more than 800 in the past week, raising concerns about its fallout on the global economy.

  • Intel's (INTC) Q4 Earnings Beat, DCG Growth Aids Revenues
    Zacks

    Intel's (INTC) Q4 Earnings Beat, DCG Growth Aids Revenues

    Intel's (INTC) fourth-quarter 2019 results benefit from growth in the data-centric businesses, driven by robust adoption of high-performance products, including Xeon Scalable processors.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: AAPL, CEVA, FIVN, SIMO and MKSI
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: AAPL, CEVA, FIVN, SIMO and MKSI

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: AAPL, CEVA, FIVN, SIMO and MKSI

  • Dillard's Launches Activewear Brand, Diversifies Portfolio
    Zacks

    Dillard's Launches Activewear Brand, Diversifies Portfolio

    Dillard's (DDS) unveils an activewear brand, Antonio Melani Active. This lifestyle brand is likely to help the company grab a share of the fast-growing activewear market.

  • Dynatrace (DT) to Post Q3 Earnings: What's in the Offing?
    Zacks

    Dynatrace (DT) to Post Q3 Earnings: What's in the Offing?

    Dynatrace's (DT) third-quarter fiscal 2020 earnings are likely to have gained from solid adoption of its Software Intelligence Platform.

  • Google and Apple Clash Over Web Browser Privacy
    Bloomberg

    Google and Apple Clash Over Web Browser Privacy

    (Bloomberg) -- Google engineers said a tool Apple Inc. developed to help users avoid web tracking is fundamentally flawed and creates more problems than it solves.The Intelligent Tracking Prevention feature on Apple’s Safari web browser, which is meant to block tracking software used by digital advertisers, can be abused to do the exact opposite, according to a paper released Wednesday by Google researchers. Google told Apple about the problem in August, and in December the iPhone maker published a blog post saying it had fixed the issues and thanking Google for its help.But Wednesday’s paper concluded that the problems go beyond the issues that Apple addressed. Instead of making a big list of cookies to block, Apple’s ITP continuously learns what websites users visit and which kinds of cookies try to hitch a ride. Over time, this creates unique cookie-blocking algorithms for each web surfer that can be used to identify and track them, according to the paper.“I can assure you that they still haven’t fixed these issues,” Justin Schuh, engineering director for Google’s Chrome browser, said on Twitter. Apple’s December blog post “didn’t disclose the vulnerabilities or appropriately credit the researchers,” he added. Apple said the bugs mentioned in the report were patched in December, but declined to comment further. “Our core security research team has worked closely and collaboratively with Apple on this issue,” a spokesman for Google said. This isn’t the first time the two tech giants have clashed over privacy. Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook has criticized internet companies for collecting too much personal information, and last year Google researchers reported a two-year long vulnerability in the iPhone maker’s software.Google’s Chrome and Apple’s Safari are two of the most popular web browsers, with Chrome used by more people overall but Safari dominating on iPhones. Apple has been touting Safari privacy features to persuade more consumers to use it. Apple first introduced Intelligent Tracking Prevention in 2017. The tool targets cookies, bits of code that let marketers follow people around the web and send them targeted ads.Google refused to block cookies for years, arguing that targeted ads help publishers and keep the internet free. But last week, the internet giant said it would eventually phase them out, setting off a race among advertisers to adapt. Privacy advocates have lauded Apple’s approach to tracking, and criticized Google for taking so long to do the same. But the paper suggests Apple may have to go back to the drawing board to find a new way to block tracking.“This bug is quite counter-intuitive, but rather very serious,” said Lukasz Olejnik, an independent cybersecurity researcher.(Updates with Google statement in fourth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Gerrit De Vynck in New York at gdevynck@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alistair Barr at abarr18@bloomberg.net, Jillian WardFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Will GPU Adoption & EPYC Deal Wins Aid AMD's Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks

    Will GPU Adoption & EPYC Deal Wins Aid AMD's Q4 Earnings?

    Robust adoption of Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) graphics cards and EPYC deal wins are expected to have driven top-line growth in fourth-quarter 2019.