WMT - Walmart Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
119.35
-0.23 (-0.19%)
At close: 4:01PM EDT
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Previous Close119.58
Open119.17
Bid119.35 x 900
Ask0.00 x 800
Day's Range118.69 - 119.85
52 Week Range85.78 - 120.71
Volume2,766,230
Avg. Volume5,642,640
Market Cap339.465B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.65
PE Ratio (TTM)26.99
EPS (TTM)4.42
Earnings DateNov. 14, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield2.12 (1.77%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-05
1y Target Est121.57
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Target adds $50 million in payroll this holiday season
    Yahoo Finance

    Target adds $50 million in payroll this holiday season

    Target makes bold investment in payroll for this holiday season.

  • Amazon Earnings: Revenue Growth Starting to Slow?
    Market Realist

    Amazon Earnings: Revenue Growth Starting to Slow?

    Amazon stock (AMZN) continues to trade at a premium to other established retailers. With earnings coming up, is revenue growth slowing down?

  • Christmas in October? Walmart to kick off holiday shopping before Halloween
    Yahoo Finance

    Christmas in October? Walmart to kick off holiday shopping before Halloween

    Thanksgiving falls later than usual this year, so retailers like Walmart have to deal with the 'anticipated intensity' of the shopping season.

  • Walmart offers holiday deals early to avoid shorter holiday season
    Reuters

    Walmart offers holiday deals early to avoid shorter holiday season

    Walmart Inc will offer online holiday deals a few days earlier this year in order to minimize the impact from a shorter selling period between Thanksgiving and Christmas, the retailer said on Wednesday. Walmart's deals on items like toys, electronics and gaming products will begin on Oct. 25. Thanksgiving, which falls on Nov. 28 this year, is a week later than last year's Nov. 22, leaving retailers with six fewer days to drive sales.

  • Target CEO: US consumer is healthy
    Yahoo Finance

    Target CEO: US consumer is healthy

    Target CEO Brian Cornell is bullish on the consumer ahead of the holiday season.

  • Will Elon Musk Talk Solar Fires on Tesla’s Earnings Call?
    Market Realist

    Will Elon Musk Talk Solar Fires on Tesla’s Earnings Call?

    Tesla is due to release its third-quarter earnings today after the markets close. Will Elon Musk answer analysts’ questions about Walmart solar roof fires?

  • The Holidays Officially Begin at Walmart; Retailer Announces Plans to Help Customers Get an Early Start on Holiday Shopping
    Business Wire

    The Holidays Officially Begin at Walmart; Retailer Announces Plans to Help Customers Get an Early Start on Holiday Shopping

    Walmart will help customers make the most of this year’s shortened holiday season by offering them more savings, more ways to shop, more top gifts to shop for and more fun in stores than ever before. “Customers count on Walmart for the best prices every day, and the holiday season is no exception.

  • Amazon’s Q3 Earnings: Should Retailers Worry?
    Market Realist

    Amazon’s Q3 Earnings: Should Retailers Worry?

    Amazon (AMZN) is scheduled to announce its third-quarter earnings after the markets close on Thursday. Will the results impact other retailers?

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, AstraZeneca, Broadcom, Intuitive Surgical and Anthem
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, AstraZeneca, Broadcom, Intuitive Surgical and Anthem

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walmart, AstraZeneca, Broadcom, Intuitive Surgical and Anthem

  • For UPS, Being Better Than FedEx Isn’t Enough
    Bloomberg

    For UPS, Being Better Than FedEx Isn’t Enough

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- United Parcel Service Inc. is offering everything to investors that FedEx Corp. isn’t, and that’s still seemingly not enough.The package-delivery company on Tuesday reported better-than-expected third-quarter earnings and maintained its full-year profit outlook. That’s a sharp contrast to FedEx’s bruising guidance cut just over a month ago, which the company blamed on a weakening global economy, and analysts blamed on idiosyncratic foot faults. UPS is trimming its capital expenditure budget by $500 million this year and next year, which will help boost its 2019 free cash flow to more than $4 billion. FedEx, meanwhile, is on track to burn cash in fiscal 2020 and Moody’s Investors Service Inc. recently lowered its outlook for the company’s credit rating. Management’s decision to nevertheless leave its $5.9 billion spending budget intact has left investors scratching their heads — particularly because the billions it has spent so far don’t appear to be yielding results.UPS on Tuesday reported another quarterly improvement in its adjusted operating margin, a sign that its own push to invest in newer planes and automated systems is paying off as it manages a deluge of less profitable e-commerce shipments. And yet, the stock fell more than 4% in early trading. The problem is, as much as UPS is widening the execution gap between itself and FedEx, it can’t escape the weakening macroeconomic backdrop.Revenue in the third quarter was marginally weaker than analysts had been expecting, and UPS warned that its profit guidance was contingent on “no further deterioration” in global trade uncertainty or U.S. industrial weakness. No one really knows what’s going to happen with trade relations. President Donald Trump signaled this week that negotiations over a partial deal with China are progressing and could lead to a signed agreement by November, but there’s little indication that the existing tariffs will be rolled back. I, for one, wouldn’t be willing to bet against a further slowdown in manufacturing, given declining shipment volumes at the railroads in the third quarter and decelerating sales growth at the likes of industrial distributor Fastenal Co.Drilling down into UPS’s results, there’s a variety of other nitpick items that take on more importance in a weaker economy. For example, while unit costs improved by 2.5% on an adjusted basis in the U.S. domestic division, the average amount of revenue UPS collected per package in that business declined by about 1%. The third quarter brought a surge in volumes, with FedEx’s decision to stop carrying packages for Amazon.com Inc. in the U.S. likely driving more of the e-commerce giant’s packages to UPS. A weakening yield will raise questions about how profitable that business can ultimately be for UPS, and whether it made the right decision by sticking with a customer that’s also increasingly a competitor.Adding to the jitters, UPS also announced on Tuesday that Jim Barber, chief operating officer and the heir apparent to CEO David Abney, was stepping down. Barber’s departure is a surprise, and it’s always going to raise eyebrows when a leadership change is announced without the simultaneous appointment of a successor. That being said, Abney has made an effort to shake up UPS’s staid culture by bringing in more executives from the outside. Earlier this year, UPS hired a PepsiCo Inc. executive, Brian Newman, to be its chief financial officer. Abney hired his chief transformation officer from Walmart Inc., his chief marketing officer from Xerox Corp. and his supply-chain solutions leader from logistics company DB Schenker. So the departure of Barber, a nearly 35-year veteran, would seem to be setting up an appointment in a similar vein. Grooming an outsider to succeed Abney would further differentiate UPS from FedEx, which is still run by founder Fred Smith and whose top executives have all been there for decades and act like it.UPS is moving in the right direction, even if the economy isn’t.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • P&G CFO reveals how Tide maker blew away Wall Street profit estimates
    Yahoo Finance

    P&G CFO reveals how Tide maker blew away Wall Street profit estimates

    It was another big quarter for consumer products giant P&G. Yahoo Finance speaks with CFO Jon Moeller.

  • Walmart (WMT) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Walmart (WMT) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    Walmart (WMT) closed the most recent trading day at $119.74, moving +0.5% from the previous trading session.

  • Top Research Reports for Walmart, AstraZeneca & Broadcom
    Zacks

    Top Research Reports for Walmart, AstraZeneca & Broadcom

    Top Research Reports for Walmart, AstraZeneca & Broadcom

  • Here's what may ruin the holiday season for most retailers
    Yahoo Finance

    Here's what may ruin the holiday season for most retailers

    A shortened holiday shopping season may raise hell for the nation's major retailers.

  • Will Amazon's (AMZN) Q3 Earnings Benefit From Prime & AWS?
    Zacks

    Will Amazon's (AMZN) Q3 Earnings Benefit From Prime & AWS?

    Amazon's (AMZN) third-quarter results are anticipated to reflect strengthening Prime enabled services and expanding AWS services portfolio.

  • Beyond Meat breakfast sandwiches steamroll into 9,000 Dunkin' stores
    Yahoo Finance

    Beyond Meat breakfast sandwiches steamroll into 9,000 Dunkin' stores

    Beyond Meat strengthens its relationship with Dunkin'.

  • NYC official calls for an NFL ‘Rooney Rule’ to boost executive diversity
    Yahoo Finance

    NYC official calls for an NFL ‘Rooney Rule’ to boost executive diversity

    Comptroller Scott Stringer recently sent a letter to over 50 S&P 500 companies calling to implement this policy when searching for new C-suite candidates.

  • UPDATE 6-Opioid settlement talks fail, landmark trial expected Monday
    Reuters

    UPDATE 6-Opioid settlement talks fail, landmark trial expected Monday

    A landmark trial over the U.S. opioid epidemic is on track to begin on Monday after drug companies and local governments failed to agree on a settlement on Friday that had been expected to be valued at around $50 billion. Top executives of the largest U.S. drug distributors and drugmaker Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd left a Cleveland courthouse on Friday and lawyers for states and thousands of local governments said there was no agreement. Paul Hanly, a lawyer for local governments that brought the bulk of the thousands of lawsuits stemming from the addiction crisis, said his team "fully expect" a trial to begin Monday.

  • Will Chipotle's (CMG) Dominance Continue with Its Q3 Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Will Chipotle's (CMG) Dominance Continue with Its Q3 Earnings Report?

    Chipotle (CMG) is set to report its third quarter results after the closing bell Tuesday, October 22.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Walmart, Macy's, Gap and Target
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Walmart, Macy's, Gap and Target

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Walmart, Macy's, Gap and Target

  • Bloomberg

    Walmart Will Take $2.2 Billion Charge for Asda Pension Shift

    (Bloomberg) -- Walmart Inc. plans to offload the cost of a retirement plan for employees of its British subsidiary Asda, incurring a pretax charge to earnings of about $2.2 billion.Under terms of the deal, Rothesay Life Plc will take over managing pension liabilities for about 12,000 members going forward. The transaction will simplify “the business at a cost which is significantly below the expected future cost of funding internally,” the companies said in a statement.Offloading the pension costs at Asda could be a step in preparation for a sale or an initial public offering. The charge will be incurred at the completion of the buyout in late 2020 or early 2021.For Walmart, having a large employee retirement plan sitting on its balance sheet is a problem if it plans to divest the unit, according to James Biggs, a partner at Employee Benefits Collective LLP, a U.K. pension consulting firm.“Rothesay takes responsibility for paying benefits to employees. In essence, it shifts the liability,” Biggs said. “Letting these liabilities rumble on into the future brings risk and potential cost creep, and can be a millstone around the neck of an employer.”Buyer CertaintyAntony Barker, a managing director at the Pension Superfund, a consolidator of British pension plans, said that transferring the pensions will tidy up the company’s balance sheet and give any buyer certainty.“Anyone looking to acquire them knows they are not buying a black hole,” Barker said.Large pension liabilities have weighed on other British retailers, most notably department-store chain BHS. In 2017, retail magnate Philip Green agreed to pay as much as $450 million to compensate 19,000 former BHS workers after months of haggling with the country’s Pensions Regulator. BHS had a massive pension deficit when it failed in 2016, a year after Green sold the chain for a pound to a former race-car driver with no retail experience.Judith McKenna, Walmart’s international CEO and a former Asda executive, said in May that Walmart is “seriously considering” an eventual IPO for Asda. A month earlier, U.K. antitrust regulators blocked J Sainsbury Plc’s bid to buy Asda, saying it would bring higher prices and less choice to shoppers. British supermarket chains have been whipsawed by economic concerns related to Brexit and pressure from German discounters Aldi and Lidl, which continue to grab market share.Walmart shares were little changed, up 0.3% to $120.17 at 10:14 a.m. in New York on Friday. The stock had gained 29% this year through Thursday’s close, outpacing the S&P 500 Index.(Adds context and comment from pension consultants beginning in fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from Benjamin Robertson.To contact the reporters on this story: Matthew Boyle in New York at mboyle20@bloomberg.net;Anne Riley Moffat in New York at ariley17@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Crayton Harrison at tharrison5@bloomberg.net, Jonathan Roeder, Lisa WolfsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Walmart (WMT) Stock Outpacing Its Retail-Wholesale Peers This Year?
    Zacks

    Is Walmart (WMT) Stock Outpacing Its Retail-Wholesale Peers This Year?

    Is (WMT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • Walmart's Asda agrees $4.9 billion Rothesay Life pension deal
    Reuters

    Walmart's Asda agrees $4.9 billion Rothesay Life pension deal

    Walmart's Asda has agreed a 3.8 billion pounds 'buy in' with Rothesay Life to secure the benefits for 12,300 members of one of its pension schemes, in a deal that simplifies its balance sheet ahead of a possible standalone listing. Walmart CFO Richard Mayfield said the company was delighted to be able to secure the pensions of its members with a leading, well financed insurer such as Rothesay Life. "This transaction is good news for members of the scheme, simplifies the Asda balance sheet and will transfer our pension liabilities at a competitive price," he said.

  • Is the Retail Picture Truly Gloomy? ETFs in Focus
    Zacks

    Is the Retail Picture Truly Gloomy? ETFs in Focus

    We need to see some more months of data before being sure about a retail slowdown.

  • Bloomberg

    Save Some of That Facebook Fury for Policy Makers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Fury is the prevailing feeling of 2019. People are angry much of the time about so many things. Sometimes, though, I wonder whether the anger is misdirected.Often, the targets are companies. There’s pressure on retailers like Walmart Inc. to restrict gun sales. There’s anger at Facebook Inc. for running a misleading political ad from President Donald Trump’s campaign. Some people are furious at oil companies for not doing more to slow climate change, and at Uber Technologies Inc. for taking advantage of drivers or worsening traffic-clogged cities.I get it. Actions of powerful companies or their failures to act can have a profound impact. They are legitimate targets for popular pressure, and companies can’t simply sell potentially harmful products or run their businesses in destructive ways and ignore the consequences.But this rage is not only about those individual companies. It’s also redirected fury about inaction by policy makers.People are mad about government inaction on gun violence, but policy makers are paralyzed and anger gets channeled at Walmart. People are mad about nonsensical political speech rules, failures to make laws on personal data privacy or corporate tax avoidance, but few Americans believe Congress or regulators will do anything. Instead, people are left to vent at companies.Have we gotten to the point where U.S. elected officials are so impotent that the only recourse is to hope profit-minded companies do the right thing — and then get angry when we believe they don’t? There are policies that companies can improve on their own, including employee pay and sexual harassment prevention. There is also a need for clarity from elected officials — either on their own or in concert with big companies.  Rules about political ads are one such example. I don’t want politicians to be able to mislead voters on Facebook, but the company is not solely responsible for the half-truth political attack ads that run on its services. Laws and tough regulation are a better approach than always relying on the wisdom of individual internet companies or television networks to make the tough calls.Gun policy, corporate tax avoidance, labor laws and protecting elections from cyberattacks are also matters policy makers are best placed to tackle. My Bloomberg Opinion colleague Matt Levine wrote about the oddity of members of Congress being angry at failures by the Federal Trade Commission to restrict Facebook’s data collection practices when Congress could impose those restrictions by passing a law.I don’t want policy paralysis to absolve companies of responsibility for doing bad things or preventing harm. And companies are not innocent here, either. They fight against laws and regulation, which effectively gives themselves more responsibility — and they sometimes use government inaction to justify their own.Facebook for years fought to exclude itself from rules that mandate disclosures of who is behind political ads on other media such as broadcast television. And Amazon.com Inc.’s history includes advocating for a national sales tax law — which it knew was unlikely to happen — while it employed aggressive tactics to avoid charging sales tax in many U.S. states. (Amazon gave up fighting state sales taxes around 2012.) Facebook, Google and Amazon are now advocating for federal laws that sometimes feel like self-serving attempts to muzzle state or local rules they don’t like or to pass the buck on controversial company policies. When California recently did act to pass a law that could force Uber and other companies to treat contract workers as employees, Uber vowed to fight it and made a technical legal argument that a law tailor-made for Uber doesn’t apply to the company. Those tactics aside, it is hard to thread the needle between saying companies like Facebook and Amazon are way too powerful and also relying solely on them to always make hard policy decisions. That’s why we have elections and a government.A version of this column originally appeared in Bloomberg’s Fully Charged technology newsletter. You can sign up here.To contact the author of this story: Shira Ovide at sovide@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shira Ovide is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. She previously was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.