CNQ.TO - Canadian Natural Resources Limited

Toronto - Toronto Delayed Price. Currency in CAD
18.78
-0.37 (-1.93%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close19.15
Open19.89
Bid18.78 x 0
Ask18.79 x 0
Day's Range18.18 - 19.90
52 Week Range9.80 - 42.57
Volume11,726,231
Avg. Volume8,172,571
Market Cap22.176B
Beta (5Y Monthly)2.15
PE Ratio (TTM)4.14
EPS (TTM)4.54
Earnings DateMay 06, 2020 - May 10, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.70 (9.11%)
Ex-Dividend DateMar. 18, 2020
1y Target Est33.00
  • OPEC meets Alberta energy minister whose ‘forgotten more than most people know’
    Yahoo Finance Canada

    OPEC meets Alberta energy minister whose ‘forgotten more than most people know’

    Savage is representing the interests of the Canadian energy patch in the historic talks hosted by the Saudi-led cartel that will also include the United States.

  • The Canadian Press

    Most actively traded companies on the TSX

    TORONTO — Some of the most active companies traded Thursday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (14,166.63, up 240.92 points.)Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Industrials. Unchanged at 47.5 cents on 24.7 million shares.Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE). Energy. Down 25 cents, or 6.08 per cent, to $3.86 on 20.5 million shares.MEG Energy Corp. (TSX:MEG). Energy. Down 28 cents, or 9.24 per cent, to $2.75 on 19.8 million shares.Crescent Point Energy Corp. (TSX:CPG). Energy. Down five cents, or 3.38 per cent to $1.43 on 14.5 million shares.Baytex Energy Corp. (TSX:BTE). Energy. Down 2.5 cents, or 5.88 per cent, to 40 cents on 13.4 million shares.Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ). Energy. Down 37 cents, or 1.93 per cent, to $18.78 on 11.7 million shares.Companies in the news:Alamos Gold Inc. (TSX:AGI). Up 62 cents, or 7.5 per cent, to $8.84. Canadian mining firm Alamos Gold Inc. reports that a group of armed robbers intercepted gold dore bars on the runway at its Mulatos mine site in Mexico, then staged a dramatic escape in a separate light aircraft. In a statement in Spanish, Alamos's Mexican subsidiary Minas de Oro Nacional says five heavily armed people subdued security guards who were loading the bars for transport on a plane on Wednesday morning.Canfor Corp. (TSX:CFP). Up 28 cents, or 3.4 per cent, to $8.45. Forestry company Canfor Corp. is making additional production cuts due to the impact of COVID-19 on the price of lumber and demand. The company says effective Monday that its Canadian lumber production will be curtailed by approximately 100 million board feet through to May 1. The cuts will result in a total production run rate of about 30 per cent as it takes downtime at the majority of its sawmills in B.C.Premier Gold Mines Ltd. (TSX:PG). Up 18 cents, or 12 per cent, to $1.68. Premier Gold Mines Ltd. says an offer made in March to buy Centerra Gold Inc.'s 50-per-cent stake in the Greenstone Gold Mines Partnership for US$205 million has not been accepted. Greenstone's principal asset is the proposed Hardrock Mine project near Geraldton, Ont. Premier, which holds the other 50 per cent stake in the project, had said an unnamed third party would be the actual buyer of the ownership stake, at Premier's option.Canada Goose Holdings Inc. (TSX:GOOS). Up $1.10, or 3.7 per cent, to $30.88. Canada Goose Holdings Inc. is moving to increase its domestic production of personal protective equipment for health-care workers across Canada. The company, best known for its luxury winter parkas, announced plans last month to start production of medical gear at two Canadian factories. It now says it will begin to reopen its other Canadian facilities over the next two weeks to bring all eight of its locations into production. Approximately 150 employees are currently producing equipment but as many as 900 employees will be working when it reaches full capacity.This story by The Canadian Press was first published April 9, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • 2 Top Canadian Oil Stocks to Buy for 2020
    The Motley Fool

    2 Top Canadian Oil Stocks to Buy for 2020

    After the oil latest price collapse Parex Resources Inc. (TSX:PXT) and Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ)(NYSE:CNQ) are very attractively valued.The post 2 Top Canadian Oil Stocks to Buy for 2020 appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of CNQ.TO earnings conference call or presentation 5-Mar-20 4:00pm GMT

    Q4 2019 Canadian Natural Resources Ltd Earnings Call

  • Canadian Retirees: CPP Should Be 100% Solvent When You Retire
    The Motley Fool

    Canadian Retirees: CPP Should Be 100% Solvent When You Retire

    The concern of would-be retirees regarding the sustainability of their pensions is valid. However, the CPP is 100% solvent and should be able to deliver. Also, the CPPIB has been able to optimize returns on assets like the Canadian Natural Resources stock. The post Canadian Retirees: CPP Should Be 100% Solvent When You Retire appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: TC Energy, Imperial Oil, Suncor Energy, Canadian Natural Resources and Kinder Morgan
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: TC Energy, Imperial Oil, Suncor Energy, Canadian Natural Resources and Kinder Morgan

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: TC Energy, Imperial Oil, Suncor Energy, Canadian Natural Resources and Kinder Morgan

  • Canadian Natural Resources (CNQ) Down 45.2% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?
    Zacks

    Canadian Natural Resources (CNQ) Down 45.2% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

    Canadian Natural Resources (CNQ) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • TFSA Users: 2 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Target During This Market Meltdown
    The Motley Fool

    TFSA Users: 2 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Target During This Market Meltdown

    During the ongoing market sell-off, TFSA investors should target high-yield options like RBI stock and CNRL stock.The post TFSA Users: 2 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Target During This Market Meltdown appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Are Options Traders Betting on a Big Move in Canadian Natural (CNQ) Stock?
    Zacks

    Are Options Traders Betting on a Big Move in Canadian Natural (CNQ) Stock?

    Investors need to pay close attention to Canadian Natural (CNQ) stock based on the movements in the options market lately.

  • Top TSX Stocks for April 2020
    The Motley Fool

    Top TSX Stocks for April 2020

    We asked our freelance writers to share their top TSX stock picks for April, including TC Energy Corp. and Restaurant Brands International Inc.The post Top TSX Stocks for April 2020 appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • TFSA Investors: 3 Stocks I’d Invest in With an Extra $6,000
    The Motley Fool

    TFSA Investors: 3 Stocks I’d Invest in With an Extra $6,000

    It's potentially the best time to buy dividend stocks over the next few months to boost your tax-free passive-income generation!The post TFSA Investors: 3 Stocks I'd Invest in With an Extra $6,000 appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • 1 Top Contrarian Canadian Oil Stock to Buy During the Oil Price Collapse
    The Motley Fool

    1 Top Contrarian Canadian Oil Stock to Buy During the Oil Price Collapse

    Ignore the latest oil price collapse and buy attractively valued Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ)(NYSE:CNQ) today.The post 1 Top Contrarian Canadian Oil Stock to Buy During the Oil Price Collapse appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Coronavirus vs. Oil Prices: Which 1 Hit the Stock Market Worse?
    The Motley Fool

    Coronavirus vs. Oil Prices: Which 1 Hit the Stock Market Worse?

    Canada’s energy sector is the whipping boy, although the Canadian Natural Resources stock can probably survive a recession. However, the containment of the health crisis should come before any market recovery.The post Coronavirus vs. Oil Prices: Which 1 Hit the Stock Market Worse? appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • As pandemic spreads, a wave of executive teams announce pay cuts
    The Canadian Press

    As pandemic spreads, a wave of executive teams announce pay cuts

    TORONTO — Murray Mullen says he was focused on the bigger picture when he approached senior executives and directors at his trucking and logistics business about taking pay cuts in response to the COVID-19 crisis.The chief executive of Mullen Group Ltd. projected how the virus could wreak havoc on the Alberta-based business, which was founded by his family and is now traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange. He said it was essential to start making plans for the company to sustain itself into the early summer."My primary objective is this: How do I make sure the business is strong so that I'm around when demand improves?" Mullen explained by phone from his home in Victoria, B.C."I can't do anything about this (virus), nobody can do anything about this, but you've got to get people back employed. The most comforting thing I can do is say, 'Look, the company's strong. It'll be around in three months.'"The board committed to forgoing any pay for 90 days, while his senior teams have "taken somewhere up to a 50 per cent pay cut," he said. Mullen himself gets a salary of $1 per year, with much of his pay made up of performance-based compensation, which he added won't amount to much this year.Several other Canadian companies have made similar financial commitments in recent days that put temporary restraints on executive salaries, an effort partly to show employees that belt tightening isn't just happening in the lower ranks. But the move can also help companies slow the bleeding of cash that might happen as the bottom falls out of their revenues.In the oil and gas industry, executives at Canadian Natural Resources and Ensign Energy Services Inc. were among the first Canadian operations to commit to lower salaries in the short term as part of broader reductions in capital spending. Others companies are expected to take similar steps in the coming weeks.These moves have drawn skepticism from some, including Larry Savage, a professor of labour studies at Brock University, who said he sees alternative motivations behind what are seemingly goodwill efforts.Savage said he believes some companies are voluntarily lowering executive salaries now in hopes of heading off the federal government, which could require reduced compensation practices for industries that want to qualify for COVID-19 bailout packages."As government is asked to step up, and play a larger role in figuring out how to deal with the crisis, people are going to turn their eyes to which companies have proactively taken steps to demonstrate they buy into this idea of: 'We're all in it together,'" he said."For a company seen as focused exclusively on its profitability, and not on the public good, I think there may be some repercussions over the long term."At Mullen Group, the CEO describes unique circumstances thrust upon his business that led to executive salary reductions. Even while shipments of food items and other "needs" are flowing pretty steadily, other parts of the business, such as services dedicated to the energy, mining and forestry industry, have taken a hit.The company projects temporary layoffs may be issued to half of their staff of 6,100 people as fewer clients require shipping services, Mullen said. A $5-million financial assistance fund has been established for eligible laid-off employees, and company benefits will be maintained, it outlined in a press release.Elsewhere, the reasons for executive salary reductions vary.Cineplex Inc., for example, outlined changes to its leadership pay structure that will take place over a month, after it temporarily laid off part-time employees and closed all movie theatres through at least April 2. Its senior executive team will forgo their base salaries for the first two weeks, and receive 40 per cent of their pay for the final two weeks. Other lower-ranking leadership would see their salaries paid at around 55 to 60 per cent, depending on their role.The monetary challenges facing Cineplex are unique, however, as the movie exhibitor approaches a June 30 deadline for the $2.8-billion takeover of the company by Cineworld PLC. One of the conditions of the transaction is that Cineplex keeps its debt below $725 million, while it's headed into a period some observers say could totally reshape the movie business.Other companies are focused on a broader reduction in capital spending, which in the resources sector has included delaying major projects.Energy giant Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. said last week its president would see a salary reduction of 20 per cent. Other members of its management committee will see pay reduced by 15 per cent while vice-presidents and board members would see a smaller reduction of 10 to 12 per cent.Oilpatch company Ensign Energy Services Inc. announced a pay cut for its top executives on Monday, lowering the salary of its president and chief operating officer by 20 per cent and its chair by 40 per cent.Recipe Unlimited Corp., which owns marquee brands such as Swiss Chalet, Harvey's and St-Hubert, outlined a voluntary suspension of compensation for its CEO on Tuesday until its locations are "fully back open for business." The food services company, which currently only offers pick-up and delivery options, said the board's compensation was also frozen among other changes that include dividend payment suspension and a temporary halt to royalty fee collection.But companies will find other ways to compensate their executives that aren't directly tied to salary, Savage suggested, for example payment in shares in the company, preferred stocks, and promises made for when the pandemic is over."A narrow focus on salary obscures the picture a little bit," he said."Income inequality was a huge problem before the pandemic and that gap between the super rich and the rest of society is likely to grow even more in the wake of COVID-19. The cynic in me says that as soon as the economy turns around, the executives will be the first people asking for bonuses and pay raises."Partha Mohanram, a professor of accounting at Rotman School of Management, said that while companies can go public with executive salary reductions for disclosure purposes, the leadership is effectively engaging in what's "partly a PR exercise.""Some of it just signalling (from the companies)," he said. "I'm not saying this is wrong, this is absolutely an appropriate signal... but pardon me if I don't feel all warm and fuzzy by the supposed altruism."This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 25, 2020.Companies in this story: (TSX:CGX) (TSX:ESI) (TSX:CNQ) (TSX:RECP)Follow @dfriend on Twitter.David Friend, The Canadian PressNote to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version improperly quantified the salary reductions of Cineplex leadership.

  • TSX Stocks: 2 Canadian Giants That Lost 70% Amid Coronavirus Crash
    The Motley Fool

    TSX Stocks: 2 Canadian Giants That Lost 70% Amid Coronavirus Crash

    Top TSX stocks: High-quality businesses at such attractive levels is a lucrative opportunity.The post TSX Stocks: 2 Canadian Giants That Lost 70% Amid Coronavirus Crash appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Oil Stocks: Is Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ) or Suncor (TSX:SU) a Buy?
    The Motley Fool

    Oil Stocks: Is Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ) or Suncor (TSX:SU) a Buy?

    Oil stocks are looking quite attractive at today's values. However, it is best to stick with those deemed best-in-class. The post Oil Stocks: Is Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ) or Suncor (TSX:SU) a Buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • TFSA Investors: 2 Cheap TSX Stocks to Scoop Up Now While the Price Is Low
    The Motley Fool

    TFSA Investors: 2 Cheap TSX Stocks to Scoop Up Now While the Price Is Low

    The Canadian Natural Resources stock and Suncor Energy stock might be excellent buys on the dip amid the ongoing market crash.The post TFSA Investors: 2 Cheap TSX Stocks to Scoop Up Now While the Price Is Low appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • A Sliding Share Price Has Us Looking At Canadian Natural Resources Limited's (TSE:CNQ) P/E Ratio
    Simply Wall St.

    A Sliding Share Price Has Us Looking At Canadian Natural Resources Limited's (TSE:CNQ) P/E Ratio

    To the annoyance of some shareholders, Canadian Natural Resources (TSE:CNQ) shares are down a considerable 69% in the...

  • Canadian Natural (CNQ) Surges: Stock Moves 8% Higher
    Zacks

    Canadian Natural (CNQ) Surges: Stock Moves 8% Higher

    Canadian Natural (CNQ) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 8% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • Oil Crisis: Should You Buy This TSX Stock During a Market Crash?
    The Motley Fool

    Oil Crisis: Should You Buy This TSX Stock During a Market Crash?

    Investors were selling into the oil crisis this week. But are big names like Canadian Natural Resources Ltd (TSX:CNQ)(NYSE:CNQ) a buy for their dividends?The post Oil Crisis: Should You Buy This TSX Stock During a Market Crash? appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.

  • Stock Market Crash 2020: 2 Stocks That Can Double Your Money
    The Motley Fool

    Stock Market Crash 2020: 2 Stocks That Can Double Your Money

    The stock market crash will go down in history as one of the most volatile. Stocks such as Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ) are too cheap to ignore. The post Stock Market Crash 2020: 2 Stocks That Can Double Your Money appeared first on The Motley Fool Canada.