BP - BP p.l.c.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
41.86
-0.32 (-0.76%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

42.16 +0.30 (0.72%)
Pre-Market: 8:08AM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close42.18
Open42.25
Bid42.23 x 4000
Ask42.32 x 800
Day's Range41.83 - 42.25
52 Week Range36.28 - 47.25
Volume2,881,850
Avg. Volume4,826,123
Market Cap142.9B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.56
PE Ratio (TTM)14.30
EPS (TTM)2.93
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.46 (5.88%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-05-09
1y Target Est50.08
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • BP (BP) Stock Moves -0.76%: What You Should Know
    Zacks14 hours ago

    BP (BP) Stock Moves -0.76%: What You Should Know

    BP (BP) closed the most recent trading day at $41.86, moving -0.76% from the previous trading session.

  • 3 Top Stocks With High Dividend Yields
    Motley Fool15 hours ago

    3 Top Stocks With High Dividend Yields

    High yields don't have to mean high risk with Altria, BP, and Philip Morris International.

  • Does BP Have Weaker Financials than Its Peers?
    Market Realist2 days ago

    Does BP Have Weaker Financials than Its Peers?

    BP’s (BP) has the highest percentage of debt in its capital structure. In the first quarter, BP’s total debt-to-capital ratio stood at 43%, the highest among its peers. ExxonMobil (XOM) and Chevron (CVX) had lower ratios of 17% and 18%, respectively.

  • Trump Warns Iran for Drone Attack: Oil Stocks in Spotlight
    Zacks5 days ago

    Trump Warns Iran for Drone Attack: Oil Stocks in Spotlight

    As the fate of crude exploration and production companies is positively correlated with the commodity price, the recent oil rally therefore perks up the crude weighted-stocks.

  • ExxonMobil Tops Its Peers with Its Strong Financials
    Market Realist5 days ago

    ExxonMobil Tops Its Peers with Its Strong Financials

    ExxonMobil (XOM) has the lowest percentage of debt in its capital structure compared to its peers. In the first quarter, ExxonMobil’s total debt-to-capital ratio stood at 17%.

  • BP, CVX, RDS.A, XOM, SU, or TOT: Who Has More Financial Muscle?
    Market Realist5 days ago

    BP, CVX, RDS.A, XOM, SU, or TOT: Who Has More Financial Muscle?

    Let's evaluate six global integrated energy companies based on their debt and cash flow positions. We'll start by ranking them on their total debt-to-total capital ratios in the first quarter of 2019.

  • Norway's $1T Money Manager to Ditch Oil Stocks: Here's Why
    Zacks5 days ago

    Norway's $1T Money Manager to Ditch Oil Stocks: Here's Why

    Norway's $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund maintained that the decision was prompted by financial considerations and is not an ethical drive.

  • Stock Market News For Jun 21, 2019
    Zacks5 days ago

    Stock Market News For Jun 21, 2019

    The S&P 500 hit a new record-high on Thursday as investors??? appetite for risky assets like equities were bolstered by the Fed???s indication that a rate cut was likely this year.

  • Factors That Make Chevron (CVX) an Enticing Investment Pick
    Zacks6 days ago

    Factors That Make Chevron (CVX) an Enticing Investment Pick

    Strong Permian focus, handsome dividend payment and robust financials make Chevron (CVX) an enticing stock now.

  • Oilprice.com6 days ago

    BP Chief Pushes Renewable Investment Boost

    BP’s CEO Bob Dudley has a warning for the world, stating that not enough is being done to combat climate change

  • BP (BP) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks7 days ago

    BP (BP) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, BP (BP) closed at $41.09, marking a +0.02% move from the previous day.

  • BP rig reaches North Sea oilfield after Greenpeace protest delays
    Reuters7 days ago

    BP rig reaches North Sea oilfield after Greenpeace protest delays

    A BP drilling rig reached its destination in the North Sea on Wednesday after 11 days of delays due to Greenpeace protests over climate change, the activist group said. The 40,000 tonne Paul Loyd JNR left Cromarty Firth, north of Inverness, Scotland last Friday, after being held for six days by activists who had climbed and camped out on one of its legs. Once at sea, the rig and its support vessels were forced to turn away three times after Greenpeace's Arctic Sunrise ship prevented it from reaching the Vorlich oilfield to start its drilling campaign.

  • BP Stock Has Fallen 0.7% but Outperformed Total and Suncor
    Market Realist9 days ago

    BP Stock Has Fallen 0.7% but Outperformed Total and Suncor

    BP (BP) stock has fallen 0.7% in the past month since May 13. Total (TOT) and Suncor Energy (SU) stock have fallen by 0.8% and 2.9%, respectively.

  • U.S. Oil Demand Was Scorching Hot Last Year -- but Gas-Guzzling SUVs Aren’t to Blame
    Motley Fool11 days ago

    U.S. Oil Demand Was Scorching Hot Last Year -- but Gas-Guzzling SUVs Aren’t to Blame

    America consumed 2.5% more crude in 2018 than in 2017, and you might be surprised where that extra oil wound up.

  • Senegal police detain protesters amid outcry over gas deal
    Reuters12 days ago

    Senegal police detain protesters amid outcry over gas deal

    Senegalese riot police fired tear gas and detained more than 20 people on Friday at an unsanctioned protest in Dakar over a BBC report of allegations the president's brother was involved in fraud related to two offshore gas blocks developed by BP PLC. Prosecutors have said they will open an investigation following the publication of the BBC report earlier in June. The report has caused public outcry and cast a shadow over Senegal's energy plans years before the first oil and gas starts flowing.

  • ExxonMobil, SABIC Eyes Texas Petrochemical Unit Construction
    Zacks12 days ago

    ExxonMobil, SABIC Eyes Texas Petrochemical Unit Construction

    ExxonMobil (XOM) expects the construction of new petrochemical complex in Texas to commence in third-quarter 2019.

  • TOTAL in Talks, Might Buy 30% of Adani Gas for $800M
    Zacks12 days ago

    TOTAL in Talks, Might Buy 30% of Adani Gas for $800M

    Per a media report, TOTAL (TOT) might acquire 30% interest in Adani Gas, and benefit from rising demand of natural gas in India.

  • Reuters12 days ago

    More Greenpeace activists climb on BP drilling rig after arrests

    Greenpeace activists climbed back on a drilling rig on Friday to keep it from heading to a BP oilfield in the British North Sea, hours after police removed protesters who had boarded the vessel days earlier. On Thursday night police removed and arrested two Greenpeace activists who had spent over 70 hours blocking the rig from leaving Cromarty Firth, north of Inverness, Scotland, Greenpeace said in a statement. "We can’t give up and let oil giants carry on with business as usual because that means giving up on a habitable planet and our kids’ future," said Greenpeace UK’s executive director, John Sauven.

  • BP Is Burning a Lot of Gas in Permian as Output Exceeds Pipe
    Bloomberg14 days ago

    BP Is Burning a Lot of Gas in Permian as Output Exceeds Pipe

    The BHP assets burn or vent just over 15% of the gas they produce, the second most in the Permian, according to Rystad Energy, an Oslo-based consultant. For BP to attain its self-stated goal of reducing flaring globally, the company may be forced to put some drilling on hold while it waits for more pipelines to be built, according to Artem Abramov, head of shale research at Rystad.

  • Oilprice.com14 days ago

    Extreme Weather Could Send Global Energy Demand To Record High

    BP’s chief economist sees extreme weather as one of the reasons that global energy demand and emissions are growing at growing at a fast pace

  • Total Stock Down Just 2% in Q2: What’s the Story?
    Market Realist14 days ago

    Total Stock Down Just 2% in Q2: What’s the Story?

    In the second quarter, Total (TOT) stock has fallen 2% due to lower oil prices. WTI has fallen 11%.

  • Oil’s 2019 Weakness Has Roots in 2018’s Strength
    Bloomberg14 days ago

    Oil’s 2019 Weakness Has Roots in 2018’s Strength

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Oil has a demand problem. You can see it, most obviously, in headline crude oil prices, which slumped again Wednesday morning. You can see it in Asian refining margins and physical premia. You can see it in Saudi Arabia’s efforts to maintain supply cuts, rapidly turning into an oily version of Dylan’s Never Ending Tour.You can also see it in some historical figures in BP Plc’s Statistical Review of World Energy, the annual data bible that dropped on Tuesday. Looking at numbers for 2018 and prior years might seem superfluous to judging what’s happening in 2019. Moreover, the headline growth figure for 2018 of 1.4 million barrels a day, or 1.5%, is pretty robust. Its fragility lies beneath.BP breaks out figures for almost 80 individual countries, but only three really counted last year:That just three countries can pull global demand along may seem comforting to oil bulls. But it’s a narrow group to rely on, especially when two members are engaged in a trade war. Manufacturing indicators have weakened for all three in recent months, and vehicle sales have been particularly bad in India and China. Meanwhile, the U.S., which reports the most timely and transparent data on oil flows, reported another increase in inventories Wednesday – and that follows an extraordinary build-up in stocks of crude and refined products in May.In light of all that, it should worry oil bulls that demand growth across the rest of the world altogether vanished in 2018 – especially as global economic growth is forecast to be slower this year, partly because of that trade war, and the tailwind of exceptionally low fuel prices that prevailed in 2016 and much of 2017 is behind us.The other important aspect revealed in the Statistical Review concerns the types of oil being consumed. BP highlighted the increased importance of lighter liquids such as naphtha and ethane related to petrochemicals in the overall mix. You can see this in the chart below, where “other light distillates” and “other” liquids accounted for 54% of net growth in demand last year. Notice, too, what happened to gasoline and diesel.Naphtha prices have weakened considerably in Asia, along with gasoline. This is partly a function of Chinese refiners staying busy and taking advantage of looser export controls to dump excess products elsewhere in the region (something energy economist Philip Verleger has highlighted in several recent reports centered on the collapse in Singapore refining margins). Naphtha competes with natural gas liquids, and supply of the latter has also surged, largely as a by-product of the shale boom. The U.S., accounting for almost 40% of production, is the OPEC of natural gas liquids – apart from the crucial distinction that it shows no inclination to cut supply despite prices having slumped to their lowest level in more than two years:The thing about excess supply, though, is that it also suggests deficient demand. Coming amid weaker economic data, reliance on petrochemical demand represents a big risk for oil markets this year. It’s worth looking again at the BP data, which show that output from refineries actually increased by less than a million barrels a day in 2018, which also reflects the rising share of lighter liquids. Crude oil demand is ultimately a function of what refiners want to buy and process – they’re the direct customers, not you and me.As I wrote here, after a relatively weak first half, oil bulls’ hopes for 2019 rest largely on the usual seasonal upswing in refining runs in the third quarter. Yet the economic, inventory, and ultimately pricing indicators put that at risk. The International Energy Agency has been slow to cut demand forecasts, finally trimming them last month by a mere 90,000 barrels a day to 1.3 million a day. The IEA will update those later this week, and it will be surprising indeed if another cut isn’t forthcoming. After all, we now know the warning signs have been there since at least last year.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at ldenning1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.