VZ - Verizon Communications Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
57.74
+0.52 (+0.91%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close57.22
Open57.75
Bid57.67 x 900
Ask57.69 x 900
Day's Range57.08 - 58.12
52 Week Range48.84 - 62.22
Volume17,105,590
Avg. Volume21,481,873
Market Cap238.928B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.42
PE Ratio (TTM)13.03
EPS (TTM)4.43
Earnings DateJul. 24, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.46 (4.30%)
Ex-Dividend DateApr. 09, 2020
1y Target Est60.04
  • How protests spurred Corporate America into action on race, inequality
    Yahoo Finance

    How protests spurred Corporate America into action on race, inequality

    Outrage over George Floyd’s killing at the hands of Minneapolis police officers have pushed America to the brink, but have also spurred numerous big companies and brands into a new form of activism.

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    Telecom Firms' 5G Rollout on Track Despite COVID-19 Hiccups

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  • GlobeNewswire

    6/4/20: Verizon declares quarterly dividend

    BASKING RIDGE, N.J., June 04, 2020 -- The Board of Directors at Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE, Nasdaq: VZ) today declared a quarterly dividend of 61.50 cents per.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Verizon Communications to report earnings July 24, 2020

    BASKING RIDGE, N.J., June 03, 2020 -- Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE, Nasdaq: VZ) will report second quarter 2020 earnings on Friday, July 24. The company will present.

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    Here Are My Top 3 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Buy Now

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  • How Hollywood is responding amid George Floyd protests
    Yahoo Finance Video

    How Hollywood is responding amid George Floyd protests

    Yahoo Finance's Alexandra Canal breaks down how media and entertainment giants are supporting the Black Lives Matter movement as protests continue to rage across the country in response to the death of George Floyd.

  • How Businesses Can Navigate the Minefield of Social Unrest
    Bloomberg

    How Businesses Can Navigate the Minefield of Social Unrest

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- One of the more popular sentiments expressed on Twitter over the weekend was that the astronauts who left Earth on Saturday made a good choice. After months of suffering from a global pandemic that has caused mass unemployment, school shutdowns and over 100,000 deaths, Americans are now reeling from a wave of nationwide protests following the death of a black man at the hands of Minneapolis police. What should companies say and do amid events so fraught that many people would prefer not to be on the planet?“It’s always risky for brands to weigh in on deep social unrest,” says reputation-management guru Helio Fred Garcia, president of Logos Consulting Group. Companies have learned this the hard way before — such as when Starbucks Corp. hatched an ill-advised effort to encourage people to talk about racism with their baristas in 2015 and when PepsiCo. Inc. launched a widely excoriated commercial about social activism featuring Kendall Jenner in 2017. Companies were reminded of that risk again on Saturday after National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell received fierce backlash for expressing support for the protesters. His statement was viewed as insincere by many after the experience of Colin Kaepernick, a player who has not been signed by a team since 2017 after protesting racism and police brutality.So companies can start by taking a look in the mirror. Facebook Inc., for example, needs to do some hard thinking about its policies after choosing not to flag a Facebook version of a Twitter post by President Donald Trump threatening to shoot looters. That decision has staffers so upset that some staged a virtual walkout Monday. (Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged in a post that his company must do more to “ensure our systems don't amplify bias.”) Companies should be prepared to answer questions — from employees, the news media and other stakeholders — about how they can do more to fight racism and promote diversity.Leaders should also communicate with employees who are on edge, seeking their feedback on how they can better promote diversity, address employee concerns, and fight unconscious bias and other forms of racism. But while every organization should be having these conversations internally, companies should proceed cautiously before publicly wading into the protests.Speaking out publicly comes with two risks. The first is that such efforts will be perceived as self-serving. Many television commercials referencing the coronavirus, for example, have been panned as thinly veiled efforts to use the pandemic to promote consumer spending. The second risk is that commercials or other statements of public support will only remind the public of a company’s record of inaction (the Pepsi commercial) or dubious actions (the NFL). Indeed, a 2016 study by Weber Shandwick and KRC Research found that public activism boosts a company's reputation when it is related in some way to what a company is already doing — but it backfires when it is perceived as discordant with a company's business. If a company has a well-established record of openly fighting racism, speaking out publicly now will be perceived as credible. And if a company — or its employees or stakeholders — has been drawn into the fray, the public will expect it to say something. Garcia notes that companies whose stores have been damaged in the protests will be expected to respond. Macy’s Inc.’s flagship store in New York’s Herald Square was looted Monday night, and the company would be wise to respond compassionately. Designer Marc Jacobs offered a laudable example for other retailers to follow after one of his own stores was damaged:View this post on Instagram A post shared by Marc Jacobs (@themarcjacobs) on May 31, 2020 at 9:38am PDTOf course, many other executives will be tempted to join the bandwagon to express support for fighting systemic racism. But they should start by taking action. Companies including Verizon Communications Inc., Intel Corp., Facebook, Peloton Cycle Inc. and Levi Strauss & Co. have all announced major monetary contributions to organizations that promote social justice. Such donations — along with changes to corporate practices — are the place to start.Once an organization has firmly established a record of supporting racial equality, it can authentically join the public conversation. But without such actions, attempts to generate positive publicity by tying corporations to the cause will be more likely to be perceived as shallow and self-serving, generating backlash that may leave more chief executives wanting to leave the planet.    This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Kara Alaimo is an associate professor of public relations at Hofstra University and author of “Pitch, Tweet, or Engage on the Street: How to Practice Global Public Relations and Strategic Communication.” She previously served in the Obama administration. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Verizon Communications, PayPal, BP and General Electric
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    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Verizon Communications, PayPal, BP and General Electric

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Verizon Communications, PayPal, BP and General Electric

  • Love Dividends? 2 Stocks You Might Want to Buy
    Motley Fool

    Love Dividends? 2 Stocks You Might Want to Buy

    Exposure to 5G tailwinds and the increasing importance of connectivity could help make these stocks big winners.

  • 3 Reasons the Growth Story for T-Mobile Stock Could Come to an End
    Motley Fool

    3 Reasons the Growth Story for T-Mobile Stock Could Come to an End

    T-Mobile (NASDAQ: TMUS) has just completed its takeover of Sprint. Between this merger and its massive investment in 5G mobile technology, T-Mobile has become one of only three companies launching a 5G network across the U.S. Long an emerging player in the wireless industry, T-Mobile stock saw massive gains as the telco cut prices and gained market share during the 3G and 4G eras.

  • Top Analyst Reports for Apple, Verizon & PayPal
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    Top Analyst Reports for Apple, Verizon & PayPal

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  • 5 Dogs of the Dow for the Month of June
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    5 Dogs of the Dow for the Month of June

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  • Bloomberg

    FCC Chief Takes On the Pentagon...and DOT, and NOAA, and Energy

    (Bloomberg) -- In his quest to expand U.S. mobile broadband capacity, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai hasn’t been afraid to anger colleagues in government.He’s taken on the Pentagon, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as well as the departments of Transportation and Energy. Those agencies have warned that his plans to reallocate spectrum could endanger national security, harm weather forecasts, loosen control of the electrical grid and degrade vehicle safety.So far, Pai has prevailed.“Pai is willing to get himself on the hot seat,” said Doug Brake, telecom policy director for the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a Washington-based policy group that works to accelerate innovation.The fights are worth billions of dollars as industries jockey for rights to airwaves, riding a boom in usage for such things as online shopping, streaming television and social media. Appetite for gadgets and the airwaves on which to run them is only growing: the U.S. will have 1.2 billion mobile connected devices by 2023, up from 560 million in 2018, according to a forecast by Cisco Systems Inc.Pai’s independence may be tested in coming months as President Donald Trump has ordered the FCC to draw up regulations to keep social media companies such as Twitter Inc. from censoring political speech.“This debate is an important one,” Pai said in a statement. “The Federal Communications Commission will carefully review any petition for rulemaking filed by the Department of Commerce.”Pai, whose office didn’t reply to requests for comment, has an insiders’ profile that doesn’t suggest a penchant for inter-agency skirmishing. He is a former FCC commissioner, agency staff lawyer and U.S. Senate aide, and before that an attorney for Verizon Communications Inc. President Donald Trump elevated him three years ago to chairman of the commission, which was created in 1934 to keep radio signals straight and now doing the same with wireless broadband.Pai, 47, presents a whimsical public face for an agency steeped in arcane technical policy making. He spices his remarks with pop-culture references, citing the TV sitcom “The Office” and the film “The Big Lebowski.” His Twitter feed branches from telecom policy into philosophy, architecture and sports teams from Kansas City, not far from his childhood home in Parsons, Kansas.As chairman, he has made priorities of pruning regulations and pushing for more mobile broadband to feed the nation’s insatiable appetite. With backing from the agency’s Republican majority, he’s compiled a series of victories for the wireless industry -- and at times setbacks for older uses of airwaves.NOAA, for example, said the FCC’s push to reallocate some spectrum would set back satellite-assisted weather forecasting decades. The Transportation Department warned about road safety when a patch of airwaves set aside for driverless cars was reassigned. The Energy Department opposed taking spectrum used by the power companies.Perhaps most memorably, the Defense Department raised alarms about the FCC’s April 20 approval of a mobile broadband network, saying the service will interfere with military and civilian GPS.Wins and losses are closely linked in airwaves policy because of the nature of spectrum -- the invisible electromagnetic waves that carry communications. Each slice of airwaves can carry one use; a second use on the same frequencies threatens interference, just as a shouted conversation in a room can drown out a quiet chat.To avoid conflicts, regulators including the FCC put different services on separate airwaves. Antennas listen for the chatter on their assigned channels, and don’t pick up signals at higher and lower frequencies, which in turn are left to other users.Assignments, including some set decades ago, have come under question as the mobile broadband revolution deepens, bringing fresh demand for airwaves to handle booming wireless traffic. Old services are being forced to move to different airwaves or share their frequencies with new arrivals.Pai’s FCC has worked to set up frequencies for more Wi-Fi and the high-speed gadgetry that will combine to form the 5G revolution of fast, ubiquitous wireless connections -- a priority for the White House and big tech and telephone companies. The changeover promises such wonders as remote surgery, autonomous cars, rich virtual reality video feeds, and factories humming with connected equipment.Pai takes credit for rearranging a dozen swaths of spectrum. The amount of airwaves affected is more those used by all U.S. mobile broadband providers, Pai said in a video posted on the agency website last year.Friction is inevitable as broadband and other wireless technologies vie for space in the crowded tableau of airwaves swaths, known as bands.“Finding new bands or new opportunities to reallocate for new purposes is more difficult than ever before,” said FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly, a Republican. “There’s no greenfields to pick from. And so finding new spectrum for a new purpose means reallocating someone who already exists there.”To others, the FCC’s airwaves fights show lax management by the Trump administration, leaving cabinet officers to push their own airwaves priorities.“This is a result of running the administration as if it were an episode of ‘The Apprentice,’” said Harold Feld, senior vice president with the policy group Public Knowledge. “The federal agencies have just stopped cooperating.”Space Force Commander General John Raymond said in a May 6 congressional hearing that Ligado Networks LLC’s plans for a mobile broadband network would interfere with GPS receivers, which rely on faint signals from satellites, and harm training.The FCC shot back that it wouldn’t be moved by “baseless fear mongering.”In a May 26 letter to Representative Adam Smith, chairman of the Armed Services Committee, Pai defended the Ligado decision, saying it “included strict conditions to ensure that GPS operations continue to be protected from harmful interference.”In a teleconference with lawmakers on May 19, Pai said “America needs to lead in 5G and that requires us to think creatively about a variety of different spectrum bands.”Changes keep coming. The FCC in April voted to allow Wi-Fi on the 6 gigahertz airwaves, despite an expression of concern from the Energy Department. Utilities said the change risks interference to electric, water, and gas transmission and distribution systems. Chipmaker Broadcom Inc. called the action “momentous” and “a definitive moment in U.S. wireless history.”Airwaves AuctionMobile providers will get more opportunities in an auction slated to begin in July. Another, potentially larger airwaves sale is to begin Dec. 8 as the FCC offers a wide swath of prime airwaves now used by satellite providers such as Intelsat SA and SES SA. The satellite providers will move aside, keeping enough frequencies to serve current customers; new users will offer mobile broadband.Bidders may include largest U.S. providers Verizon, AT&T Inc. and T-Mobile US Inc., who all snapped up airwaves in earlier FCC auctions.“It isn’t easy to get the government to move quickly on anything,” Meredith Attwell Baker, president of CTIA, a wireless industry trade group with members including AT&T and Verizon, said in an email. Pai “deserves tremendous credit for making sure wireless providers have the spectrum they need to meet our nation’s 5G ambitions.”Not easy, and not without turmoil. The debate with NOAA concerned power levels for an airwaves swath that Verizon won in an FCC auction. The disagreement persisted for much of 2019 before agencies, working with the State Department, arrived at a unified position. The result was a lower power level than the FCC wanted, and more than NOAA preferred.Bipartisan leaders of both the House Science Committee and the Commerce Committee have asked the Government Accountability Office to probe how the NTIA and other federal agencies interact to resolve spectrum disputes.“‪Under the Trump administration, spectrum coordination efforts have repeatedly failed,” Democratic Representative Frank Pallone, of New Jersey, the Commerce Committee chairman, said in an email.Representative Greg Walden, of Oregon, the Commerce Committee’s top Republican, in an email said that “not everyone will be satisfied all of the time” as spectrum allocations are made.Others see confusion.“In this administration, instead of having everyone pull in the same direction, we have disputes that are pulling us apart,” said Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, the agency’s senior Democrat.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Verizon Brings 5G Service to San Diego, Momentum to Continue
    Zacks

    Verizon Brings 5G Service to San Diego, Momentum to Continue

    Verizon's (VZ) 5G Ultra Wideband network uses a millimeter-wave spectrum and is designed to provide customers with faster download speed and greater bandwidth when compared with 4G.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Verizon to redeem debt securities on June 29, 2020

    The redemption price for the 4.60% Notes will be equal to the greater of (i) 100% of the principal amount of the 4.60% Notes being redeemed, or (ii) the sum of the present values of the remaining scheduled payments of principal and interest on the 4.60% Notes being redeemed (exclusive of interest accrued to the Redemption Date), as the case may be, discounted to the Redemption Date on a semiannual basis (assuming a 360-day year consisting of twelve 30-day months) at the Treasury Rate (as defined in the 4.60% Notes) plus 25 basis points (the “4.60% Notes Redemption Price”), plus, in either case, accrued and unpaid interest on the principal amount being redeemed to but excluding the Redemption Date. The 4.60% Notes Redemption Price will be calculated in accordance with the terms of the 4.60% Notes on the third Business Day (as defined in the 4.60% Notes) preceding the Redemption Date.

  • Verizon Introduces 5G Upload Speeds to Its Next Gen Network
    Motley Fool

    Verizon Introduces 5G Upload Speeds to Its Next Gen Network

    The mobility growth story from the emergence of the smartphone over a decade ago is long gone, but Verizon's network is proving to be a basic staple among customers during the current recession. Q1 2020 wasn't perfect, but it was good enough, and next-gen 5G mobile networks should provide enough of a bump in the coming years to keep Verizon in the lead -- both in terms of its network's technological advantage and in dividend reliability. Fast download speeds tend to dominate the headlines, and in this regard Verizon shines.

  • Comtech Augments Public Safety With Revamped Product Line
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  • Verizon Furthers E-Learning for the Underprivileged Communities
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  • Better Buy: Verizon Communications vs. AT&T
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: Verizon Communications vs. AT&T

    Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) and AT&T (NYSE: T) have long operated as each other's main competitors. Now, together with T-Mobile, they continue to compete for wireless business as the telecom industry transitions to 5G. The approaches pursued by Verizon and AT&T have taken each of these telecom stocks on different trajectories.

  • Guru Gowrappan Verizon Media CEO and Alan Murray Fortune President & CEO join Yahoo's Reset Your Mindset at Work special
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Guru Gowrappan Verizon Media CEO and Alan Murray Fortune President & CEO join Yahoo's Reset Your Mindset at Work special

    Guru Gowrappan Verizon Media CEO and Alan Murray Fortune President & CEO join Yahoo's Reset Your Mindset at Work special. Topics range from mental health to how companies can help their employees cope with the stress of the COVID-19 pandemic and the isolation of working from home.