TSLA - Tesla, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
243.66
-1.54 (-0.63%)
As of 10:57AM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close245.20
Open246.00
Bid243.71 x 1400
Ask243.79 x 1100
Day's Range242.78 - 247.40
52 Week Range176.99 - 379.49
Volume2,155,336
Avg. Volume7,536,046
Market Cap43.646B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.33
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-3.85
Earnings DateOct 22, 2019 - Oct 28, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est252.92
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Electric Pickup Trucks: Could Ford and GM Outdo Tesla?
    Market Realist

    Electric Pickup Trucks: Could Ford and GM Outdo Tesla?

    In the electric pickup truck market, legacy automakers Ford and GM are set to take on established electric vehicle maker Tesla and startups such as Rivian.

  • Is Tesla Bear Jim Chanos Buying Something New?
    Market Realist

    Is Tesla Bear Jim Chanos Buying Something New?

    Jim Chanos, the founder and president of Kynikos Associates, is a long-time short-seller of Tesla stock. Tesla stock has fallen 17.5% in the last year.

  • It’s Porsche Versus Tesla Facing Off in Germany’s Green Hell
    Bloomberg

    It’s Porsche Versus Tesla Facing Off in Germany’s Green Hell

    (Bloomberg) -- First there was derision. Then mockery turned into admiration. Now a battle is unfolding between two of the most revered names in the automobile world, Porsche and Tesla Inc. on one of the world’s most challenging race tracks.The two automakers are vying for electric vehicle bragging rights on Germany’s Nürburgring, a circuit with 73 tight turns (Silverstone in the U.K. has 18), changing elevations and a brutal length of more than 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) winding through a leafy forest, earning it the nickname “Green Hell.”It’s here that Porsche’s new Taycan Turbo S set the record as the fastest four-door electric car last month, clocking in at 7 minutes and 42 seconds. The feat wasn’t lost on a rival sitting thousands of miles away in California: Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk. Always one to relish a good fight, Musk picked up the gauntlet and has dispatched a Model S to the German hinterland to reclaim the bragging rights as king of the electric sedan.“We welcome competition, it helps you to get better step by step. But of course you always have to compare apples with apples,” Porsche AG Chief Executive Officer Oliver Blume told Bloomberg Friday on the sidelines of a panel discussion near the Frankfurt auto show.The epic battle between incumbent and upstart has been infused with social-media feeds that have energized die-hard fans on either side of the Atlantic. Adding to the frenzy is former Formula One racing champion Nico Rosberg, who chimed in on Twitter offering to pilot the Tesla. Musk happily accepted in a tweeted reply, but it’s unclear who actually will be behind the wheel.Porsche’s Blume said Tesla had selected another driver “who knows the Nürburgring well,” but he declined to provide a name.Musk has a lot riding on the challenge. After Porsche unveiled the Taycan Turbo and Turbo S as its first electric cars last week, he teased the brand for its nomenclature -- a turbocharger is only found in a combustion engine. Following the initial ribbing, he found more charitable words in a later tweet, acknowledging the Taycan “does seem like a good car” and its Nürburgring track time “is great.”Blume said Friday the respect is mutual, but was careful to note the Taycan’s record was achieved with a normal series production car that came straight from the assembly line and can be purchased by customers. Tesla, by contrast, has already been working for about two weeks near the track to modify a Model S for racing purposes to achieve the fastest-possible time, the Porsche CEO said.While a series version Model S wouldn’t be able to beat the Taycan’s lap time, a modified race version with tweaked suspension and brakes “could go in that direction,” Blume said. “We have a lot of respect for Tesla. They have achieved a lot and Elon Musk built this company from scratch.”The stakes are also high for Volkswagen AG‘s luxury sports car unit, which has watched Tesla turn itself into a veritable alternative for customers seeking a high-performance car but with an electric powertrain, an open flank that the Stuttgart-based manufacturer now hopes to protect with the Taycan.Musk posted on Sept. 6 that a Model S would make an appearance at the track “next week.” Indeed, a modified Model S has been spotted testing on the Nürburgring Nordschleife, according to Car and Driver, which appeared to show the car on the track as part of a general driving session open to others. The model sported flared fenders and an enlarged opening at the front, probably for extra cooling.When exactly the car might attempt to break the Taycan’s record remains shrouded in mystery. Tesla didn’t respond to a request for comment on its plans. A spokesman for the Nürburgring said Tesla has not officially booked exclusive time with the track.The Tesla-Porsche competition may be a marketing spectacle, but one that nevertheless helps to draw attention to electric vehicles, said Gene Munster, a managing partner at venture capital firm Loup Ventures and longtime Tesla bull. Munster predicted Tesla would race a souped-up version of the Model S at Nürburgring, and that it will beat Porsche’s Taycan record.“Elon wouldn’t take it to the track if they didn’t think they would win,” Munster said in a phone interview. “He’s fiercely competitive, and he loves sticking it to traditional automakers. It’s his hobby. He feels confident.”Tesla tweeted on Sept. 11 that a Model S with a new “Plaid” powertrain beat the record for the fastest four-door sedan at Laguna Seca, a race track near Monterey, California, though the time wasn’t achieved during a competitive event and hasn’t been endorsed by the raceway.Pushing the round below 10 minutes is the ambition of all Nürburgring daredevils. The track is open to both professional and amateur drivers, and the fastest time with a street-legal sports car was 6 minutes and 44 seconds, performed in a Porsche GT2 RS MR on Oct. 25 last year, according to the circuit’s website. That’s an average speed of 185 kilometers an hour for the 20.8 kilometer stretch.(Updates with comments from Porsche CEO in second paragraph)\--With assistance from Hayley Warren and Oliver Sachgau.To contact the reporters on this story: Elisabeth Behrmann in Frankfurt at ebehrmann1@bloomberg.net;Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.net;Christoph Rauwald in Frankfurt at crauwald@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Benedikt Kammel, Chester DawsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla’s Range: Can It Outpace the Competition?
    Market Realist

    Tesla’s Range: Can It Outpace the Competition?

    Tesla (TSLA) has maintained an edge over its competition, highlighted by its robust range. Depending on the model, Tesla EVs offer ranges of 240–370 miles.

  • T. Boone Pickens Saw How Fast Energy Markets Could Change
    Bloomberg

    T. Boone Pickens Saw How Fast Energy Markets Could Change

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- T. Boone Pickens, the legendary American oil entrepreneur who died this week at 91, was known for his aggressive corporate plays in the 1980s and the oil and gas investing strategies that earned (and sometimes lost) him billions since the 1990s. He also had a vision for America’s energy future. His 2008 Pickens Plan thoughtfully delineated which resources needed to flow, and where, to make the U.S. energy-independent.Last week, as it happened, I was at Pickens’s Mesa Vista Ranch to talk to investors and industry executives about how fast the energy system is changing, thanks to new technology — some of it envisioned by Pickens, and some not. Reflecting now on Pickens and his plan, I’m struck, first, by his boldness in imagining a changed energy future and, second, by how quickly things shifted in ways even such a visionary could not foresee.At almost the exact moment the Pickens Plan debuted, oil prices hit their all-time peak of $147 a barrel. They’re now hovering about $90 a barrel lower.As Pickens mentioned in his whiteboard presentation, the U.S. was then importing most of the oil it consumed. U.S. production amounted to a little over 5 million barrels a day. Since then, thanks to the hydraulic fracturing revolution, oil production has more than doubled.And natural gas production has risen almost 60%.In 2008, as Pickens noted, half of America’s electricity supply came from coal, a share that has since fallen to 27%. In the Pickens Plan, wind and nuclear power were expected to displace gas-fired power, so that gas could be shifted into transportation. Solar energy and electric vehicles were not even mentioned. Now, both natural gas and wind have become alternatives to coal, while the biggest disruption for oil has been new technology in the oil business itself.Pickens got the wind industry wrong, by his own rather salty admission. But, that’s not a criticism of his plan. (As he pointed out, he wasn’t really wrong, just early.) It’s a testament to the man’s forward thinking that he could see natural gas as an alternative to oil, and wind as a major source of power. A new research paper from the World Economic Forum has an elegant framework for thinking about such energy transitions: They differ according to whether you consider the big picture of global supply and demand, or the change that happens at the margins of both. The authors describe these two narratives as “gradual” and “rapid.”The gradual narrative, the authors say,… is that the energy world of tomorrow will look roughly the same as that of today. Gradual scenarios extrapolate current patterns of policy, industry, consumption and investment, thus supporting planned carbon-intensive investment decisions and implying that the global energy system has an inertia incompatible with the Paris Agreement.The rapid narrative, on the other hand,… is that new energy technologies are rapidly supplying all the growth in energy demand, leading to peak fossil fuel demand in the course of the 2020s. Rapid scenarios suggest that current technologies and new policies will reshape markets, business models and patterns of consumption, challenging planned carbon-intensive investment and leading to a low-carbon global economy while creating considerable economic and social benefits.The difference is explained by the fact that total global energy supply is immense and grows only about 1 to 2% per year. In 2017, total primary energy supply was 13,475 million metric tons of oil equivalent; the change in supply was 246 million metric tons of oil equivalent. A focus on the former makes it hard to see not only that change is happening but also that change is possible.Last year’s growth in supply was unusually high, but more than a third of it came from renewable energy. If total supply had grown only as much as it did in 2015, then renewables would have been all new supply. In other words, the implications of rapid change are significant. No one sets out to get things wrong, of course, least of all Pickens, who spent $100 million of his own money on his plan. Some questions have yet to be answered — and big changes are underway — even in large and established systems like energy. Rapid changes are happening even faster than their proponents expected.Pickens was also an avid Twitter user to the very end. Seven years ago, the recording artist Drake tweeted that “The first million is the hardest.” Pickens, who had made and lost far larger amounts many times over, had this response:Weekend readingJoe Nocera bids fond farewell to T. Boone Pickens.We are in the era of four gas mega-players, says Nikos Tsafos — Russia, the U.S. and Qatar as exporters, and China as importer.The shipping industry’s dream of carbon neutrality is drifting away.Investment manager David Swensen made Yale fabulously rich.In markets gone mad, investors find rare comfort in data science.Karl Smith has some good news about income inequality.WeWork’s planned IPO marks the end of the unicorn era.Felix Salmon outlines MIT’s expanding Jeffrey Epstein scandal.Insurers are dropping home coverage in Berkeley, California, due to fire risk.A new poll finds that Democrats and Republicans both say humans are causing climate change, though they differ in their certainty about human causes.Last month, Porsche set a four-door electric car record at the Nürburgring. Tesla now plans to beat that record, with former Formula One champion Nico Rosberg driving.To contact the author of this story: Nathaniel Bullard at nbullard@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mary Duenwald at mduenwald@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nathaniel Bullard is a BloombergNEF energy analyst, covering technology and business model innovation and system-wide resource transitions.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Could Nio Be a Better Buy than Tesla?
    Market Realist

    Could Nio Be a Better Buy than Tesla?

    I’ve been pounding the table for a while on Nio (NIO) stock as a viable alternative to the rather richly priced Tesla (TSLA).

  • Robotaxis: Voyage versus Ford, Waymo, and Tesla
    Market Realist

    Robotaxis: Voyage versus Ford, Waymo, and Tesla

    Autonomous ride-sharing and robotaxi startup Voyage has raised about $31 million in the Series B round, according to its press release.

  • Here’s Why Tesla Bulls Are Having a Nightmare
    Market Realist

    Here’s Why Tesla Bulls Are Having a Nightmare

    Tesla stock is having a terrible run this year. Based on yesterday’s closing prices, the stock is down 26.1%, while the S&P; 500 has risen 20.0%.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, IAA, Fox Factory and General Motors
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, IAA, Fox Factory and General Motors

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, IAA, Fox Factory and General Motors

  • Trade War on Hold as China Celebrates Mid-Autumn Fest
    Market Realist

    Trade War on Hold as China Celebrates Mid-Autumn Fest

    September 13 was China's Mid-Autumn Festival. Some investors may be expressing gratitude for the recent trade war decisions made by Jinping and Trump.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: Ford's Europe Electric Plans, General Motors' Deal With Google
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: Ford's Europe Electric Plans, General Motors' Deal With Google

    While Ford (F) unveils lineup for EVs in Europe, General Motors (GM) collaborates with tech giant Alphabet to roll out in-vehicle technology.

  • Toyota using Tesla-style Panasonic batteries for China hybrids - sources
    Reuters

    Toyota using Tesla-style Panasonic batteries for China hybrids - sources

    Toyota Motor Corp has started using the same type of battery that Panasonic Corp designed for Tesla Inc in some of its plug-in hybrids sold in China, sources familiar with the matter said. Toyota is using Panasonic's cylindrical batteries in its new Corolla and Levin plug-in hybrid sedans launched in China this year, one of the people said. The batteries are the same size as those that Panasonic makes for Tesla, but the composition is different, said the sources, who declined to be identified as the matter is private.

  • Tesla (TSLA) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Tesla (TSLA) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Tesla (TSLA) closed at $245.87 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.5% move from the prior day.

  • Has Tesla Met Its Match at the German Auto Show?
    Zacks

    Has Tesla Met Its Match at the German Auto Show?

    The ongoing Frankfurt Motor Show with its focus on electric vehicles and a growing number of Chinese participants, is testimony to the fact that there's good reason to still go for a Tesla.

  • Tesla Gets Support from Rivals: Are Bears Listening?
    Market Realist

    Tesla Gets Support from Rivals: Are Bears Listening?

    Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess has shared optimistic views on Tesla (TSLA), and Volvo has heaped praise on Tesla’s energy efficiency.

  • Ford, Tesla, GM: Analysts Rank the Top Automakers
    Market Realist

    Ford, Tesla, GM: Analysts Rank the Top Automakers

    Among the top automakers, GM received 74% “buy” ratings from analysts. Ford garnered 39% "buy" ratings from analysts, and Tesla received 32% "buy" ratings.

  • Tesla Stock: Why Analysts Think It’s Undervalued
    Market Realist

    Tesla Stock: Why Analysts Think It’s Undervalued

    Tesla stock has lost more than a quarter of its value year-to-date. The fall represents a significant underperformance compared to the broader markets.

  • The Electric Cars Are Here. Now How About Selling Them
    Bloomberg

    The Electric Cars Are Here. Now How About Selling Them

    (Bloomberg) -- It only took a decade for traditional automakers to take electric cars seriously and offer more than a smattering of test-the-water models.Now comes the hard part: Getting consumers to buy them.At Frankfurt’s 2019 car show, Volkswagen AG Chief Executive Officer Herbert Diess laid it on thick, calling on governments to give up coal-fired power as he unveiled the electric ID.3 car-for-the-masses. At the Mercedes-Benz stand, where the Daimler AG brand was showing the prototype of an electric S-Class sibling, real beech trees framed massive screens displaying schools of digital fish.The message to environmentally conscious consumers: we’re with you. But a marketing blitz alone won’t wash away the deep uncertainties facing electric cars -- obstacles little changed since carmakers’ initial forays with models like the Nissan Leaf and BMW AG i3. Customers don’t like paying up for new technology they’re unsure about, and they’re worried they won’t reliably get to where they want to go.“The next big thing is not going to be about the cars, because they will come,” Carlos Tavares, president of the European Automobile Manufacturers Association and CEO of Groupe PSA, said Wednesday. “The next big thing is about affordable mobility. The next big thing is about how we make this work for the biggest number of people.”So far, electric cars have only proliferated in countries with significant sweeteners. Once they go, sales of battery models crater. Demand in China, the world’s biggest electric car market, fell 16% in August -- its second straight decline -- after the government scaled back subsidies. Carmakers can reduce prices, but then only cut into profitability that in most cases has been nonexistent.Consumers are similarly sensitive elsewhere. Demand in Denmark collapsed when the government phased out tax breaks in 2016.“We’ve been talking about EVs for years, but this year the real production cars showed up,” Max Warburton, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, wrote in a note. “Should we be celebrating these cars, given the poor margins that most will have?”Across Europe, sales of new plug-in hybrids and fully-electric cars last year made up 2% of total registrations. That’s a tiny market to tussle over for the likes of VW’s ID.3, with a price point below 30,000 euros ($33,009), Tesla Inc.’s Model 3 and Mercedes’s gleaming lineup of plug-ins. Yet carmakers have little choice but to boost their offering to keep pace with regulation, or face fines.Consumer demand “can’t be mandated,” Daimler CEO Ola Kallenius said at the show. Mercedes-Benz is adding at least 10 purely battery-powered cars through 2022 at a cost of more than 10 billion euros, starting with last year’s EQC SUV, so the carmaker’s lineup can to meet stricter emission limits.A lot of factors are moving in the right direction. The ID.3’s price point and basic range of 330 kilometers (205 miles) sets the car apart from previous efforts that needed meticulous pre-planning for longer trips. At the top end, there’s now the $185,000 Porsche Taycan Turbo S, and a mid-range that’s rapidly filling out from SUVs like the Jaguar I-Pace and Audi e-tron.Patchy charging infrastructure is improving too. Ionity, a consortium of Daimler, VW, Ford Motor Co., BMW and now Hyundai Motor Co., is on track to finish building a network of 400 European fast-charging stations by next year to make long-distance travel easier.Lean YearsFor carmakers, this will mean some lean years -- at least to 2025 when battery prices are expected to come down -- during which lucrative conventional SUVs must subsidize poor returns from their electric cousins. VW will need “patience” until the ID.3 brings significant profit “joy,” Chairman Hans Dieter Poetsch said.To bridge the gap, the industry is lobbying hard for governments to step up incentives to get to the oft-cited tipping point where driving without a combustion engine becomes normal. In Germany, home to VW, Mercedes and BMW as well as world-leading suppliers like Continental AG, the government sits down next week to discuss broad climate measures. Carmakers are hoping for a bigger slice of subsidies than they got so far.The ACEA on Wednesday called on national governments to boost charging points in Europe to 2.8 million by 2030, a 20-fold increase from 2018.“We need strong support, because if we don’t do it,” simply offering electric cars won’t be enough for sales to take off, PSA’s Tavares said.\--With assistance from Richard Weiss.To contact the reporters on this story: Oliver Sachgau in Munich at osachgau@bloomberg.net;Christoph Rauwald in Frankfurt at crauwald@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Elisabeth BehrmannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • An Unlikely Basket of Stocks Is Leaving Latest Rally in the Dust
    Bloomberg

    An Unlikely Basket of Stocks Is Leaving Latest Rally in the Dust

    (Bloomberg) -- Hedge funds that may be closing their short positions might just be contributing to one basket of unloved stocks outperforming the North American market.JPMorgan’s call on Wednesday for market participants to take advantage of a small window in September to cover shorts may have anticipated some stocks moving higher -- and which are providing unexpected outperformance. A quick screen of North American stocks with market caps above $100 million, with a 50% decline year-to-date and short interest above 20% yields a basket of 17 stocks that are, on average, outperforming the market on Wednesday. The data came from analytics firm IHS Markit Ltd.READ: JPMorgan Says Most-Shorted Value Stocks Among Best Options BetsThese “unloved” stocks are up about 4% on Wednesday, while the S&P 500 is higher by about 0.5% in late afternoon trading. The basket includes some stocks with cult-like followings, such as GameStop Corp., which fell after a lousy quarter and, on the flipside, stocks such as Dean Foods, which almost doubled just this month after plunging virtually the entire year.The 17 stocks that are in the basket are:Any discussion of short-covering would hardly be complete without touching on Tesla Inc. which is one of the most shorted stocks in North America, with almost 26% or $8 billion of its total float shorted, according to Markit data. The electric carmaker wasn’t included in the basket because the screen only looked for stocks that had also lost more than 50% of their value year-to-date.Tesla has climbed 9.5% since the start of September after having slumped about 32% year-to-date until the end of August. And today it’s up as much as 5.4%, indicating the possible presence of short covering.READ: Here Is a Popular Momentum Trade Unwinding This MonthTo contact the reporter on this story: Aoyon Ashraf in Toronto at aashraf7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brad Olesen at bolesen3@bloomberg.net, Scott Schnipper, Jennifer Bissell-LinskFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Could Tesla Be Trump’s Next Target after Ford and GM?
    Market Realist

    Could Tesla Be Trump’s Next Target after Ford and GM?

    President Trump has targeted Ford and General Motors recently. We'll see whether Tesla (TSLA) could be next in Trump's sights.

  • New Rivian Investment: Could It Be the Real Tesla Killer?
    Market Realist

    New Rivian Investment: Could It Be the Real Tesla Killer?

    Yesterday, electric truck maker Rivian revealed that it had landed an investment of $350 million from automotive services company Cox Automotive.

  • Should Tesla See Volkswagen’s ID.3 as a Threat?
    Market Realist

    Should Tesla See Volkswagen’s ID.3 as a Threat?

    Volkswagen unveiled its all-electric ID.3 at the Frankfurt auto show. The model’s name is conspicuously similar to the Tesla Model 3.

  • Ford Boosts Its Europe Plan with New Electric Vehicles
    Market Realist

    Ford Boosts Its Europe Plan with New Electric Vehicles

    Ford plans to launch eight electric vehicles in Europe this year. The automaker aims to get most of its European revenue from electric cars by 2022.

  • The 5 Best Stocks to Invest in for Self-Driving Cars
    Market Realist

    The 5 Best Stocks to Invest in for Self-Driving Cars

    Self-driving cars are inevitable, and billions of dollars are going into this technology. We take a look at five of the best stocks in the industry right now.

  • China’s NEV Sales Drop Again: Effects on Tesla, NIO
    Market Realist

    China’s NEV Sales Drop Again: Effects on Tesla, NIO

    In addition to China’s passenger vehicle sales, its sales of NEVs (new energy vehicle) also fell for the second straight month in August.