TSLA - Tesla, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
219.76
-3.88 (-1.73%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

220.10 +0.34 (0.15%)
After hours: 7:59PM EDT

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Previous Close223.64
Open224.39
Bid220.10 x 800
Ask220.90 x 800
Day's Range219.50 - 225.34
52 Week Range176.99 - 387.46
Volume6,182,071
Avg. Volume11,555,479
Market Cap39.159B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.03
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • New Tesla Arcade Game Hands-On: Beach Buggy Racing 2
    Engadget6 days ago

    New Tesla Arcade Game Hands-On: Beach Buggy Racing 2

    We take a first look at Beach Buggy Racing 2.

  • Companies to Watch: Amazon Prime Day announced, GrubHub upgrades, Tesla wins big
    Yahoo Finance10 hours ago

    Companies to Watch: Amazon Prime Day announced, GrubHub upgrades, Tesla wins big

    Amazon, GrubHub, Tesla, Sam’s Club and WarnerMedia are the companies to watch.

  • Tesla faces delivery bottleneck at close of second quarter - Electrek
    Reuters5 hours ago

    Tesla faces delivery bottleneck at close of second quarter - Electrek

    Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk had said last month that the company was on course to deliver a record number of cars in the quarter, beating the 90,700 it sent to customers in the final quarter of last year. Electrek did not give any delivery number for international markets for the quarter. The report said that when international market numbers are added, especially in places like Norway and China, Tesla will get pretty close to a new record.

  • Barrons.com5 hours ago

    Strong Q2 Deliveries Could Drive Tesla Stock Higher, Analyst Says

    Shares of Tesla, which have risen for most of June, could get a further boost from the car maker’s second-quarter delivery and production report.

  • U.S. Solar Installations Increase 10% in Q1: 3 Stocks to Buy
    Zacks11 hours ago

    U.S. Solar Installations Increase 10% in Q1: 3 Stocks to Buy

    The U.S. solar market installs 2.7 gigawatts direct current (GWdc) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity, leading to the strongest Q1 in the industry's history.

  • Tesla: Tariff Waiver on Japanese Aluminum Imports Could Help
    Market Realist11 hours ago

    Tesla: Tariff Waiver on Japanese Aluminum Imports Could Help

    On June 24, the Department of Commerce approved Tesla’s request “to waive 10% tariffs on imported aluminum from Japan.” On June 25 at 8:45 AM ET, Tesla stock rose 0.2% for the day in the pre-market session.

  • Elon Musk’s Fortune Is Shifting Away From Tesla and Toward SpaceX
    Bloomberg12 hours ago

    Elon Musk’s Fortune Is Shifting Away From Tesla and Toward SpaceX

    (Bloomberg) -- Early this morning at Cape Canaveral, employees of Elon Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies Corp. rejoiced.A Falcon Heavy delivered 24 satellites into three distinct orbits while the rocket’s twin boosters landed safely back on Earth almost simultaneously. Apart from the failure of the center booster to land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean, the mission that Musk had described as SpaceX’s toughest test yet had been a success.Read more: SpaceX launches Falcon Heavy rocket in toughest liftoff yetThe launch underscores SpaceX’s status as one of the world’s most valuable closely held companies. It’s worth $34 billion, according to an analysis by EquityZen, a marketplace for shares of tech firms that haven’t yet gone public.While investors are clamoring for a piece of Musk’s space company, they’ve been less sanguine lately about the fortunes of his publicly traded Tesla Inc. Shares of the electric carmaker have tumbled 33% this year amid concern that consumer demand is slackening and competition stiffening.The divergence has reshaped one of the world’s biggest fortunes. Musk is the world’s 41st richest person with a net worth of $22.4 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. SpaceX now makes up two-thirds of his wealth, with Tesla accounting for most of the remaining third. That’s a reversal from previous years where Tesla was responsible for the bulk of his fortune on Bloomberg’s ranking.SpaceX’s success still hasn’t been enough to completely offset the decline in Musk’s wealth this year. It has dropped by $1.7 billion.\--With assistance from Dana Hull.To contact the reporter on this story: Tom Metcalf in London at tmetcalf7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Pierre Paulden at ppaulden@bloomberg.net, ;Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Peter Eichenbaum, Steven CrabillFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Motley Fool22 hours ago

    Corporate Boards Are Supposed to Oversee Companies but Often Turn a Blind Eye

    The consequences for board members of corporations found to violate the law and ethical norms are rare and usually minor. Here's a look at what the board is supposed to do - and sometimes doesn't.

  • If Loeb Likes Breakups, Another Target Awaits
    Bloomberg2 days ago

    If Loeb Likes Breakups, Another Target Awaits

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Dan Loeb wants to split up Sony Corp. to enhance its value. The company isn’t the only household name in Japanese electronics that might benefit from the treatment.Panasonic Corp. shares have dropped more than 40% over the past 12 months after a partnership with Tesla Inc. disappointed; the company forecast earnings will decline; and a restructuring plan put forward last month failed to convince investors. The firm is trading on a multiple of 3.8 times enterprise value to Ebitda, compared with a five-year average of 4.6 times.Loeb’s Third Point LLC has called for a spinoff of Sony’s semiconductor business, aiming to reduce the stock’s so-called conglomerate discount – the situation where a company is valued at less than the sum of the different businesses it owns. It’s an analysis that could equally be applied to Panasonic.Last month, the Osaka-based company released a mid-term plan that will increase its number of divisions to seven from four. Panasonic aims to shift its focus away from the automotive business, which is struggling under the shadow cast by the difficulties in its relationship with Tesla. The electronics maker also announced a series of partnerships and alliances, and estimated restructuring costs of about 90 billion yen ($840 million), according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.Analysts say Panasonic still doesn’t have a coherent strategy, and investors clearly want more change. So could a breakup be the solution?The answer from a sum-of-the-parts analysis is a clear: maybe. If Panasonic listed all its business segments separately and they traded at the mid-point of their peer-group ranges of between 4 times and 9 times enterprise value to Ebitda, then the combined value would be 2% higher than the company’s current market capitalization of about $20 billion. At the high end of the ranges, Panasonic could increase its value by as much as 32%. At the low end, though, there’s a similar amount of downside.(1)Analysts in Japan have questioned Loeb’s proposal for Sony. While they lauded his effort to improve the company’s valuation, they also cast doubt on whether the activist investor’s proposals were feasible or made strategic sense. A Sony split may unlock value now but, as my Bloomberg Opinion colleague Tim Culpan asked, what’s the vision for the future? As Sony analysts have pointed out, Loeb has reversed course since 2013, when he recommended that the company sell part of its film unit.This uncertainty is precisely where a breakup proposal may make sense for Panasonic, though. Pulling apart its various businesses – grouped broadly under appliances, automotive and industrial systems, connected solutions and eco solutions – would enable investors to put their money where they see value and growth prospects, without being encumbered by laggard businesses.For instance, sales for the connected solutions segment rose 6.9%(2) in the 2019 fiscal year, helped by the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 and growing demand from businesses to help automate tasks. Itochu Techno-Solutions Corp., which competes in a similar business, is trading on a forward price-earnings ratio of 23 times.Panasonic thought the automotive business would drive its profitability over the past three years. Even here, running the unit separately could create more value. Panasonic has teamed up with Toyota Motor Corp. and already has partners other than Tesla. With demand for electric cars and the pace of adoption being reassessed, the company could take time to leverage its technology advantage. In the process, the segment’s rising fixed costs won’t weigh down other more profitable businesses. In fact, investors might give a standalone battery business a higher valuation, as they’ve done with South Korean battery-makers Samsung SDI Co. and LG Chem Ltd.Analysts at Credit Suisse AG downgraded the stock on Friday, noting that they see “no signs of a rebound in earnings in the near term,” and that it was unclear how the company and its profit would look after the restructuring. Earnings at the auto business, where the analysts earlier saw potential for sales growth, is unlikely to improve over the medium term, they said.There are additional reasons why a breakup should be considered. For one, the government is incentivizing spinoffs with tax breaks. Meanwhile, domestic institutional investors are becoming more activist: The rejection rate for takeover defense measures has risen over the past six years to 80.5% from 40%, according to Goldman Sachs. That’s close to the 85% rate for foreign investors.Panasonic has some thinking to do. Loeb, meanwhile, might just have a new target. --With assistance from Elaine He. (1) Sum-of-the-parts analysis for Panasonic is based on FY2019 operating profit for each segment and used the following assumptions:1. Average enterprise value to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization for peer group of each segment.2. A range of two times above and below average multiple.(2) Includes exchange-rate effects.To contact the author of this story: Anjani Trivedi at atrivedi39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • U.S. waives tariffs on Japanese aluminium for Tesla battery cells
    Reuters2 days ago

    U.S. waives tariffs on Japanese aluminium for Tesla battery cells

    The U.S. Commerce Department has agreed to Tesla Inc's request to waive 10 percent tariffs on imported aluminium from Japan used in the manufacture of battery cells at Tesla's Nevada Gigafactory, government documents show. The Commerce Department said in a document dated June 5 and posted on a government website in recent days that the aluminium "is not produced in the United States in a sufficient and reasonably available amount or of a satisfactory quality." The waiver is good for one year. Tesla did not immediately comment.

  • Is the Dreaded ‘Synchronized Global Slowdown’ Back on the Table?
    Market Realist2 days ago

    Is the Dreaded ‘Synchronized Global Slowdown’ Back on the Table?

    In December 2017, we saw a sharp rally in almost all asset classes as markets started pricing in what many called “synchronized global growth” for 2018. However, as 2018 started drawing to a close, fears of a synchronized global slowdown hit markets. All leading economies were expected to grow at a slower pace in 2019 as compared to 2018.

  • Weekly Tech Stock News: Facebook's Cryptocurrency, Slack's IPO, and More
    Motley Fool3 days ago

    Weekly Tech Stock News: Facebook's Cryptocurrency, Slack's IPO, and More

    This week's top tech stories feature Facebook, Slack, and Apple.

  • 3 Top Value Stocks to Buy Right Now
    Motley Fool3 days ago

    3 Top Value Stocks to Buy Right Now

    You might think our third contributor has lost his mind.

  • How Many Vehicles Will Tesla Deliver in Q2?
    Motley Fool4 days ago

    How Many Vehicles Will Tesla Deliver in Q2?

    Expect huge growth both sequentially and year over year.

  • Tesla (TSLA) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
    Zacks5 days ago

    Tesla (TSLA) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Tesla (TSLA) closed at $221.86, marking a +1.02% move from the previous day.

  • Negative Analyst Notes Both Hurt -- and Help -- Tesla Stock
    Motley Fool5 days ago

    Negative Analyst Notes Both Hurt -- and Help -- Tesla Stock

    Tesla bears dominated the headlines yesterday. Today, the bulls got a chance to weigh in.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Tesla, Uber Technologies, Intel and Nvidia
    Zacks5 days ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Tesla, Uber Technologies, Intel and Nvidia

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Tesla, Uber Technologies, Intel and Nvidia

  • Barrons.com5 days ago

    Wall Street Is Too Gloomy About Tesla, Analyst Says

    Baird analyst Ben Kallo reiterated an Outperform rating while boosting his price target on the shares from $340 to $355.

  • Car Parts Plant for Ford, Tesla Resuming Work After Brief Strike
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Car Parts Plant for Ford, Tesla Resuming Work After Brief Strike

    (Bloomberg) -- Workers at a major auto parts plant in Michigan are poised to return to work after a brief strike Friday, alleviating the threat of a supply disruption for carmakers Ford Motor Co., Tesla Inc. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV.The United Auto Workers called the strike early Friday morning after failing to reach a tentative contract agreement with Faurecia SA. A tentative deal has been reached, Misty Matthews, a Faurecia spokeswoman, said by phone.Faurecia’s plant in Saline, about 40 miles west of Detroit, employs 1,900 UAW members. The factory makes instrument panels, center consoles and other parts and supplies them to Ford, Tesla and Fiat Chrysler.To contact the reporter on this story: Kyle Lahucik in Southfield at klahucik3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, David WelchFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Basic Income’s Backers Complicate Their Cause
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Basic Income’s Backers Complicate Their Cause

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, an entrepreneur and philanthropist from New York, has drawn less attention than most of his counterparts. But he has been noticed for one big, bold proposal -- a universal basic income, or UBI, which would give every American $12,000 a year with no strings attached. Yang has thus become the most public champion of an idea that is gaining currency in some corners of the left and the right.Basic income has a long and interesting history, with similar proposals dating back at least to the 1500s. It was championed in the 1700s by Revolutionary War pamphleteer Thomas Paine, and in the early 20th century by populist Louisiana Governor Huey Long. In the 1960s, economists on both the political left and right, including big names like Paul Samuelson, Milton Friedman, James Tobin and John Kenneth Galbraith, all supported either basic-income schemes or the similar idea of a negative income tax. President Richard Nixon tried to implement a guaranteed income program, but it was defeated in Congress, while Nixon's 1972 election opponent George McGovern floated an even more ambitious plan. Yang is therefore reviving an old idea -- it’s only the size of his proposal that is new and radical.But the case for basic income is being hampered by dubious arguments being made on its behalf. Yang, for example, claims that UBI is necessary to save people from the penury they will experience once automation makes them obsolete as workers:Technology is quickly displacing a large number of workers, and the pace will only increase as automation and other forms of artificial intelligence become more advanced. ⅓ of American workers will lose their jobs to automation by 2030 according to McKinsey.This assertion echoes similar sentiments from many in the technology industry, such as Tesla founder Elon Musk and YCombinator Chairman Sam Altman.The problem is, there’s no indication that automation is going to make human workers redundant anytime soon. Technologists probably tend to believe in automation-induced job loss because they’re familiar with the inventions that are constantly forcing people to change what they do for a living. But even as these new technologies have been rolled out, the fraction of Americans with jobs has remained about the same over time. Meanwhile, evidence that automation causes job losses throughout the economy is slim.In other words, automation so far shows no sign of having the kinds of effects Yang claims are imminent. The dire-sounding number Yang cites from McKinsey should be given little credence. Studies like this simply ask engineers how many existing jobs could be done by machines; even if the engineers’ guesses are right, they fail to say how many new jobs will be created in the process, so they don’t give any picture of technology’s overall impact on the labor market.Thus, when UBI proponents make the dubious claim that basic income is necessary to save people from the rise of the robots, they undermine their case. They also send the message that they think a huge percent of American workers are simply too useless to be gainfully employed in the future -- hardly an appealing message.The second dubious reason to support UBI is the idea that it can replace traditional forms of welfare spending, like food stamps and housing vouchers. Libertarian economist Milton Friedman supported a negative income tax for this reason, and modern-day libertarians often espouse this view as well.But there are reasons UBI will never be a one-size-fits-all solution. First, it’s expensive. Giving all Americans $12,000 a year costs a lot more than giving money to poor people only. Income taxes would need to be raised on the middle class and rich -- effectively swallowing up the UBI payments for all but the poor. But such high taxes can distort the economy in various ways. Second, food stamps and housing vouchers are typically used to increase consumption of food and housing -- things that society generally believes poor people ought to be spending their money on. So although UBI might allow the government to spend somewhat less on other forms of assistance, it shouldn’t be viewed as a full replacement for these programs -- and people are unlikely to embrace it as a replacement.These flawed justifications for UBI have won the idea an eclectic base of support. But they serve to distract the public from the simplest, most reasonable case for UBI. Basic income, unlike minimum wage and the earned income tax credit, provides money for those who are unable to work. In doing so, it doesn’t pay people not to work, because poor people’s benefits don’t decrease when people get jobs (at much higher income levels, the taxes needed to pay for UBI might discourage work, but that is a different issue). In other words, UBI is a form of welfare that doesn’t require people to be able-bodied but also doesn’t incentivize them to be indolent.Basic income is an interesting idea worthy of more attention and more experiments, like the one in Finland. Proponents should stop trying to frighten people about automation or create a false tradeoff between UBI and other forms of welfare. Instead, if they are going to argue for UBI, they should simply emphasize the idea’s simplicity and fairness.To contact the author of this story: Noah Smith at nsmith150@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Noah Smith is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He was an assistant professor of finance at Stony Brook University, and he blogs at Noahpinion.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla Bulls at Jefferies Say They Got It Wrong This Year
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Tesla Bulls at Jefferies Say They Got It Wrong This Year

    (Bloomberg) -- One of Tesla Inc.’s biggest fans among Wall Street brokers said the carmaker’s share price decline in 2019 has been “humbling,” slashing its price target by a quarter while still recommending investors buy the stock.“We got it wrong so far this year, but remain convinced there is significant value,” Jefferies analysts Philippe Houchois and Himanshu Agarwal wrote in a note Friday, cutting their full-year gross profit estimates by 20%. Performance in coming quarters will remain volatile as the company’s manufacturing and model range expand, they said.Tesla’s stock fell 1.3% in pre-market trading in New York, adding to a 3% decline a day prior as analysts at Goldman Sachs and RBC Capital Markets both raised alarm bells about the company’s sales outlook.However, Jefferies says current negativity around demand and competition is “excessive,” given Tesla’s technology edge and tested path to profitability compared with legacy original equipment manufacturer peers.The bank cut its price target to $300 a share from $400, compared with an average of $270.4 among analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. The shares are down 34% year-to-date, closing at $219.6 on Thursday.Meanwhile, R.W. Baird, another broker with a buy rating on Tesla, on Friday raised its price target to $355 a share from $340, saying it expects the stock to react positively to quarterly delivery numbers in the first week of July given current low expectations.The bears’ argument that Model 3 demand has softened is “unsubstantiated,” analyst Ben Kallo said.(Updates with Friday’s pre-market trading in third paragraph.)\--With assistance from Dana Hull.To contact the reporter on this story: Joe Easton in London at jeaston7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Beth Mellor at bmellor@bloomberg.net, John ViljoenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • This Auto Stock Jumped 31% While You Were Watching Tesla's Slump
    Motley Fool5 days ago

    This Auto Stock Jumped 31% While You Were Watching Tesla's Slump

    While Tesla fell, this former Foolish favorite has been rising.

  • Study finds drivers are clueless about what driver assistance systems can (and can't) do
    TechCrunch6 days ago

    Study finds drivers are clueless about what driver assistance systems can (and can't) do

    The problem: Driversdon't understand the limitations of these systems, according to two newstudies released Thursday by Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

  • Oilprice.com6 days ago

    Is This The Beginning Of The End For Tesla’s Solar Business?

    Tesla is no longer market leader in the residential solar PV market according to energy consultancy WoodMackenzie, and has seen its sales slump significantly in Q1 2019

  • Motley Fool6 days ago

    1 Analyst Thinks Tesla Stock Will Fall 28%

    Demand concerns once again take the spotlight.