SNC.TO - SNC-Lavalin Group Inc.

Toronto - Toronto Delayed Price. Currency in CAD
31.06
-0.39 (-1.24%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close31.45
Open31.56
Bid31.04 x 0
Ask31.05 x 0
Day's Range30.84 - 31.61
52 Week Range15.47 - 48.88
Volume460,820
Avg. Volume1,285,966
Market Cap5.453B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.59
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-5.57
Earnings DateFeb. 19, 2020 - Feb. 23, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield0.08 (0.25%)
Ex-Dividend DateNov. 11, 2019
1y Target Est35.31
  • Why the SNC-Lavalin (SNC) Stock Price Rose 24.7% in December
    The Motley Fool

    Why the SNC-Lavalin (SNC) Stock Price Rose 24.7% in December

    December was good for SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. (TSX:SNC) (NYSE:SNC), as the company announced that federal charges have been settled and that a new nuclear contract was won.

  • 2 Stocks That Lost Big in 2019 Could Rebound in 2020
    The Motley Fool

    2 Stocks That Lost Big in 2019 Could Rebound in 2020

    Husky Energy’s (TSX:HSE) stock could rebound with the price of oil in 2020. Meanwhile, sentiment could shift for SNC Lavalin (TSX:SNC).

  • Top Canada Stock Trade: Double Your Money in 2020
    The Motley Fool

    Top Canada Stock Trade: Double Your Money in 2020

    Double your Tax-Free Savings Account balance in 2020 with a long position in SNC-Lavalin Group Inc (TSX:SNC) on the Toronto Stock Exchange in Canada.

  • These 2 TSX Stocks Sank in 2019 but Could Rise 20% or More in 2020
    The Motley Fool

    These 2 TSX Stocks Sank in 2019 but Could Rise 20% or More in 2020

    Thanks to a major political scandal, SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC) sank in 2019. Could it rise in 2020?

  • 2019 Stock Losers: Can These 3 Disappointing Stocks Rebound in 2020?
    The Motley Fool

    2019 Stock Losers: Can These 3 Disappointing Stocks Rebound in 2020?

    It is not surprising the see poor performances and the sharp drop in prices of the Encana stock, SNC-Lavalin stock, and Sierra Wireless stock. Near-term recovery is unlikely.

  • SNC-Lavalin settles Libya charges, pleads guilty to single count of fraud
    The Canadian Press

    SNC-Lavalin settles Libya charges, pleads guilty to single count of fraud

    MONTREAL — SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. on Wednesday settled criminal charges related to business dealings in Libya, with its construction division pleading guilty to a single count of fraud and bringing the engineering giant a step closer to ending a long-standing scandal that tarnished its reputation and ensnared the highest office of the Canadian government.The plea deal includes a $280-million fine to be paid over five years and a three-year probation order, and appears to free SNC-Lavalin from the damaging prospect of a ban on federal contract bidding.The agreement in the Court of Quebec stays all but one of six charges of corruption and fraud brought against SNC-Lavalin and two subsidiaries in 2015.It also stipulates that SNC will engage an independent monitor who will release regular reports and can order changes to the company's compliance and ethics programs.The guilty plea represents an opportunity for the company to turn a corner since questionable practices first surfaced in 2012 and prompted the departure of former chief executive Pierre Duhaime."This is a game-changer for the company and finally allows us to put this issue behind us. I apologize for this past misconduct and welcome the opportunity to move forward," said CEO Ian Edwards, in a statement."The reputation of the company is tarnished," defence lawyer Francois Fontaine told reporters. "Judicially it’s a very good result, but the company still has a lot of work to do to show that it's a new company and gain the confidence of clients."SNC-Lavalin shares soared on the news, closing up $4.58 or 18.99 per cent at $28.70 on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Shares had been halted prior to market open.SNC-Lavalin admitted in its plea that the company — via the actions of top executives Riadh Ben Aissa and Sami Bebawi — defrauded Libya of millions between 2001 and 2011.SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. relied on a pair of shell companies incorporated in Switzerland and Panama and controlled by Ben Aissa to pay Saadi Gadhafi, son of the late Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, nearly $48 million for contracts he helped secure, "altering the competitive bidding process and causing a loss or a risk of loss to the Libyan people," the Public Prosecution Service of Canada said in a statement.The construction projects, which ranged from the Benghazi airport to the "Great Man-Made River" water pipeline, reaped nearly $1.8 billion in revenue and $104 million in net profit for SNC within a decade.The initial charges, now stayed, had also alleged that the Montreal-based company paid nearly $48 million to public officials to influence government decisions under Gadhafi's regime."This sentence must be a deterrent generally, but must not be crippling," said Crown prosecutor Richard Roy .Asked whether the deal lets the company off easy, he replied that it reflects "the severity of the crime...I challenge anyone to find a fine that is higher than that for a criminal offence."The plea deal comes on the heels of Bebawi's conviction last Sunday, when a jury found the ex-SNC-Lavalin Construction president guilty of paying off foreign officials and pocketing millions as he worked to secure contracts for the company in Libya.One of the biggest risks faced by SNC-Lavalin in the event of a conviction on corruption charges involving foreign officials was its ability to bid for construction projects in Canada and abroad. Under federal law, a bribery offence could result in a bidding ban for federal contracts for up to 10 years. It could also prompt a ban on bidding for projects backed by the World Bank.While fraud committed against the Canadian government is covered under the public works department's integrity regime — and could thus trigger a ban — a fraud offence connected to a foreign government is not, said Kenneth Jull, an expert in financial crimes and corporate compliance at Gardiner Roberts law firm in Toronto."It's very clever. You could say it's almost like a DPA through the back door," said Jull, who has endorsed deferred prosecution agreements (DPA) — a type of plea deal that steers clear of admissions of guilt — as a way to avoid punishing innocent employees for C-suite offences.SNC-Lavalin said in a statement it does not anticipate the guilty plea will affect bidding on future projects by any of its companies."The feared outright ban on public work is far removed from the worst-case scenarios that have floated around the company,” said analyst Maxim Sytchev of the National Bank of Canada.While a cloud may linger above the beleaguered firm, it is "no longer a pariah investment," he said in a note to investors. "We do expect the corruption 'discount' to dissipate over time."Nearly one-third of SNC-Lavalin's $9.3 billion in revenue in 2017 came from Canada, down from roughly a 60 per cent share of revenue in 2014. Analysts estimate that up to half of its Canadian revenue stems from federal contracts.The SNC-Lavalin case became a crisis for the governing Liberals after then-attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould claimed she was pressured by people in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's inner circle to settle criminal charges against the company through a new legal tool comparable to a plea deal.Trudeau and his aides had argued that a criminal trial could trigger the company's exit from Canada and the loss of thousands of jobs.Edwards said in October that he did not expect a plea deal on the criminal charges in the wake of the Liberal election victory."We kind of remain focused on defending ourselves through a court process,'' he told investor on an Oct. 31 conference call. "Obviously if there were opportunities for settling this in another way, we'd be open to that. But we don't expect it.''Attorney General David Lametti had refused to shut down the possibility of such an agreement, which would drop the charges against the firm in exchange for SNC admitting responsibility for breaches and agreeing to conditions such as a fine and third-party oversight.Lametti was not involved in the plea bargaining that took place over the past few months, Roy said. Director of Public Prosecutions Kathleen Roussel had been consulted ahead of the plea deal, he added.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 18, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:SNC)Christopher Reynolds , The Canadian Press

  • SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC) Pleads Guilty: What’s Next for the Stock?
    The Motley Fool

    SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC) Pleads Guilty: What’s Next for the Stock?

    SNC-Lavalin Group Inc (TSX:SNC) has faced a lot of problems this year, but the worst may finally be over.

  • CNW Group

    IIROC Trade Resumption - SNC

    IIROC Trade Resumption - SNC

  • CNW Group

    SNC-Lavalin Group Settles Federal Charges

    MONTREAL , Dec. 18, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ - SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. (SNC.TO) today announced that the federal charges arising from legacy activities in Libya between 2001 and 2011 have been settled. The Court of Quebec has accepted a plea of guilty from SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. (a subsidiary of SNC-Lavalin Group Inc.) to a single charge of fraud. All charges against SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. and its international marketing arm, SNC-Lavalin International Inc., have been withdrawn.

  • CNW Group

    IIROC Trading Halt - SNC

    IIROC Trading Halt - SNC

  • CNW Group

    /C O R R E C T I O N from Source -- Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) - Halts/Resumptions/

    In the news release, IIROC Trading Halt - SNC, issued 18-Dec-2019 by Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) - Halts/Resumptions over CNW, we are advised by the company that the Reason ...

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    The Motley Fool

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    CannTrust Holdings (USA)(TSX:TRST) is among the year's worst-performing stocks. Are any of these laggards a buy for 2020?

  • Top 2020 Long Stock Market Trade: A 30% Estimated Upside
    The Motley Fool

    Top 2020 Long Stock Market Trade: A 30% Estimated Upside

    Canadian stock market investors looking for a stock with a potential 30% upside after the new year may want to buy SNC-Lavalin Group Inc (TSX:SNC) stock.

  • CNW Group

    Atkins Nuclear Secured joint venture selected for Hanford Central Plateau Cleanup Contract

    MONTREAL , Dec. 16, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ - Atkins Nuclear Secured Holdings Corporation, a member of the SNC-Lavalin Group's (TSX: SNC) nuclear sector, is pleased to announce that Central Plateau Cleanup Company ...

  • The Canadian Press

    Most actively traded companies on the TSX

    TORONTO — Some of the most active companies traded Tuesday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (17,035.88, up 3.02 points.)Algonquin Power & Utilities Corp. (TSX:AQN). Utilities. Up two cents, or 0.11 per cent, to $18.27 on 31.2 million shares.Trevali Mining Corp. (TSX:TV). Materials. Down one cent, or 6.06 per cent, to 15.5 cents on 19.8 million shares.Tourmaline Oil Corp. (TSX:TOU). Energy, Down 48 cents, or 3.73 per cent, to $12.40 on 15.9 million shares.Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Down 12 cents, or 3.6 per cent, to $3.21 on 12.5 million shares.The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings (TSX:TGOD). Health care. Down 16 cents, or 17.98 per cent, to 73 cents on 11.4 million shares.SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. (TSX:SNC). Industrials. Down 31 cents, or 1.31 per cent, to $23.41 on 11.1 million shares. Companies in the news:Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR). Up $1.58 or 1.3 per cent to $122.49. Canada's largest railway and Teamsters Canada have reached a tentative deal to renew a collective agreement for more than 3,000 workers, ending a strike that triggered layoffs, disrupted industries and halted bulk and container shipments. Normal operations at Canadian National Railway Co. will resume Wednesday at 6 a.m. local time across Canada, the union said. Details of the settlement agreement, which must be ratified by union members, were not immediately available. Ratification is expected within eight weeks. About 3,200 CN conductors, trainpersons and yard workers across the country, who have been without a contract since July 23, have been off the job since early last Tuesday morning over worries about long hours, fatigue and what they consider dangerous working conditions.Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. (TSX:ATD.B). Up 38 cents to $43.34. Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. is proposing the largest acquisition in the company's history with a $7.7 billion deal for Australia's largest retail fuel and convenience chain. The unsolicited purchase offer for Sydney-based Caltex Australia Ltd. — its second this year — would allow the Quebec-based retailer to expand beyond North America and Europe as it aims to double the company's size. Couche-Tard CEO Brian Hannasch described the proposal as "a very compelling offer" for Caltex shareholders.The Bank of Nova Scotia (TSX:BNS). Down 62 cents to $75.18. The Bank of Nova Scotia is expecting a strong performance from its Canadian banking segment next year driven by higher contributions from business banking, credit cards and growth of Tangerine digital banking. The bank's domestic operations are forecast to contribute 30 to 40 per cent of all bank earnings in 2020, with international banking at 25 to 30 per cent, global banking and markets at 15 to 20 per cent and global wealth management at about 15 per cent. The bank said it earned $2.31 billion for the three-month period ended Oct. 31 compared with a profit of $2.27 billion in the same quarter last year.Newmont Goldcorp Corp. (TSX:NGT). Up 25 cents to $50.52. Evolution Mining Ltd. says it will invest US$150 million over the next three years in the "undercapitalized" Red Lake gold complex in western Ontario after striking a deal to buy it for US$375 million from Newmont Goldcorp Corp. In a news release, the Australian company says it plans to spend US$50 million on exploration and invest US$100 million in existing operations at the underground mining complex if the acquisition closes as expected by the end of March. Evolution says it has also agreed to boost the price by up to US$100 million payable upon new resource discovery.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 26, 2019.The Canadian Press

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of SNC.TO earnings conference call or presentation 31-Oct-19 12:30pm GMT

    Q3 2019 SNC-Lavalin Group Inc Earnings Call

  • Introducing SNC-Lavalin Group (TSE:SNC), The Stock That Slid 52% In The Last Three Years
    Simply Wall St.

    Introducing SNC-Lavalin Group (TSE:SNC), The Stock That Slid 52% In The Last Three Years

    Over the last month the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. (TSE:SNC) has been much stronger than before, rebounding by 60%. But...

  • Is This Scandal-Plagued Company a Good Buy After a Trudeau Victory?
    The Motley Fool

    Is This Scandal-Plagued Company a Good Buy After a Trudeau Victory?

    Despite Trudeau’s victory at the polls, it’s risky to buy the SNC-Lavalin stock. The prominent engineering company is not out of the woods as it faces a corruption trial.

  • New SNC-Lavalin CEO says plea deal unlikely despite Liberal election win
    The Canadian Press

    New SNC-Lavalin CEO says plea deal unlikely despite Liberal election win

    MONTREAL — The head of SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. says he is not expecting a plea deal on criminal charges against the engineering firm in the wake of the Liberal election victory."We kind of remain focused on defending ourselves through a court process," said Ian Edwards, regarding an upcoming trial on bribery and corruption charges linked to SNC-Lavalin's alleged dealings in Libya between 2001 and 2011. "Obviously if there were opportunities for settling this in another way, we'd be open to that. But we don't expect it," he said on a conference call with investors Thursday.SNC-Lavalin shares shot up 14 per cent the day after an Oct. 21 Liberal election win, which left the door open to a deferred prosecution agreement that would head off criminal prosecution.Attorney General David Lametti has refused to shut down the possibility of such an agreement, which would drop the charges against the firm in exchange for SNC admitting responsibility for breaches and agreeing to conditions such as a fine and third-party oversight.On Thursday shares rose nearly 21 per cent or $4.06 to close at $23.81 — their highest in more than three months — after SNC reported earnings that surpassed analyst expectations.The partial sale of SNC's stake in the Ontario Highway 407 toll road drove a massive year-over-year profit increase. About $2.6 billion of the firm's $2.76 billion in net income last quarter — up from $120.7 million a year earlier — came from the after-tax gains of the 407 sale.The engineering services segment played a role too. Its backlog rose nearly 10 per cent year over year to $11.42 billion in the third quarter as SNC signed seven new contracts worth roughly $500 million. Segment revenue jumped more than 11 per cent to $1.58 billion.Edwards, who was appointed president and chief executive Thursday after serving in an interim role since June, sought to showcase the fruits of his vision for the company. The firm is pivoting away from big, fixed-price construction contracts — where the bidder shoulders any cost overruns — towards a more stable business model that revolves around engineering services."It is still early days, but the decisions we made in July — to exit lump-sum turnkey construction contracting and reorganize the company to focus on our high-performing engineering services business — are demonstrating results, and I am encouraged by our progress," Edwards said in a release.SNC-Lavalin reduced its backlog of large, fixed-price contracts — which it aims to work off in the next two years — to $3.2 billion from $3.4 billion three months earlier. The bulk of them relate to light-rail projects in Canada, "which have traditionally...gone well for us," Edwards said.Some half-billion dollars' worth of the lump-sum turnkey projects are for oil and gas, however, which do not have a history of turning a profit, he added.Last October shares plunged after SNC-Lavalin revealed that federal prosecutors would not negotiate a deal, despite Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pressuring then-attorney general Jody Wilson Raybould to reverse their stance.The firm's upcoming trial concerns charges of fraud under the Criminal Code and bribery under the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act.The Caisse, Quebec's pension fund manager and SNC-Lavalin's biggest shareholder at 19.9 per cent, said it backs Edwards' appointment as CEO."Since taking the reins of the company a few months ago, he's clearly put emphasis on execution challenges. That's a good starting point for the work ahead," the Caisse told The Canadian Press in an email.Revenue for the three-month period ended Sept. 30 totalled $2.43 billion, down from $2.56 billion.On an adjusted basis, which excluded the 407 sale, SNC said it earned $218.0 million or $1.24 per share in its third quarter, up from an adjusted profit of $168.4 million or 96 cents per share a year ago.The results topped analyst expectations of adjusted income of $97.7 million or 26 cents per share, according to financial markets data firm Refinitiv.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 31, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:SNC)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • Will SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC) Stock Rebound With New CEO?
    The Motley Fool

    Will SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC) Stock Rebound With New CEO?

    On Thursday, SNC-Lavalin Group Inc (TSX:SNC) made a comforting announcement to accompany its earnings call for the quarter ended September 30.

  • The Canadian Election Could Be a Giant Win for This Embattled Stock
    The Motley Fool

    The Canadian Election Could Be a Giant Win for This Embattled Stock

    SNC Lavalin (TSX:SNC) has faced a lot of difficulties this year, but the recent Canadian elections could have triggered a buy signal for embattled shares.