SBUX - Starbucks Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
82.19
-2.33 (-2.76%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

81.75 -0.44 (-0.54%)
Pre-Market: 6:06AM EST

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Previous Close84.52
Open85.02
Bid81.65 x 900
Ask81.70 x 1000
Day's Range81.67 - 85.34
52 Week Range69.03 - 99.72
Volume8,937,603
Avg. Volume7,252,039
Market Cap94.913B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.53
PE Ratio (TTM)28.15
EPS (TTM)2.92
Earnings DateApr. 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.64 (1.90%)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb. 04, 2020
1y Target Est95.71
  • Starbucks adds Beyond Meat to its menu across 1,400 Canadian stores
    Yahoo Finance

    Starbucks adds Beyond Meat to its menu across 1,400 Canadian stores

    The company said earlier this month to expect a plant-based patty in both the U.S. and Canada this year.

  • Starbucks to launch Beyond Meat plant-based breakfast sandwich in Canada
    Reuters

    Starbucks to launch Beyond Meat plant-based breakfast sandwich in Canada

    Starbucks Corp said on Wednesday its Canadian stores will start selling a Beyond Meat Inc plant-based breakfast sandwich next week, the first time the world's biggest coffee chain will offer an imitation meat product. The Seattle-based company said its Beyond Meat sandwich, which will be topped with cheddar cheese and egg on an artisanal bun, will be available at its nearly 1,200 coffee shops across Canada on March 3. The deal intensifies the already heated rivalry between Beyond Meat and other plant-based meat producers - including Impossible Foods, Kellogg Co's Morningstar Farms, Cargill Inc [CARG.UL] and Nestle SA's Sweet Earth - which have been vying for shelf space at retailers and for deals with food service outlets.

  • Nestle and Starbucks expect coffee alliance to boost growth
    Reuters

    Nestle and Starbucks expect coffee alliance to boost growth

    Nestle and Starbucks expect new products developed under their coffee alliance will help to increase sales, executives from the two companies told Reuters in an interview this week. In May 2018, Nestle paid $7.15 billion for rights to sell Starbucks packaged coffees teas around the world, freeing up Starbucks to focus on its cafe business. The alliance is expected to help Nestle to tackle tough competition in the coffee market from rivals such as JAB Holdings.

  • Starbucks worker says he was fired for union organizing and 'to create fear'
    The Guardian

    Starbucks worker says he was fired for union organizing and 'to create fear'

    Starbucks worker says he was fired for union organizing and 'to create fear'. Worker at Orlando international airport fired shortly he emerged as a leading organizer to unionize his co-workers

  • Zacks Earnings Trends Highlights: Apple, Starbucks, Wynn Resorts and Royal Caribbean
    Zacks

    Zacks Earnings Trends Highlights: Apple, Starbucks, Wynn Resorts and Royal Caribbean

    Zacks Earnings Trends Highlights: Apple, Starbucks, Wynn Resorts and Royal Caribbean

  • Boston Beer Company, Spirit AeroSystems, Apple, Starbucks and Carnival highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Boston Beer Company, Spirit AeroSystems, Apple, Starbucks and Carnival highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Boston Beer Company, Spirit AeroSystems, Apple, Starbucks and Carnival highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, American Express, Starbucks, Goldman Sachs and BCE
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, American Express, Starbucks, Goldman Sachs and BCE

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, American Express, Starbucks, Goldman Sachs and BCE

  • Top Stock Analyst Reports for Apple, American Express & Starbucks
    Zacks

    Top Stock Analyst Reports for Apple, American Express & Starbucks

    Top Stock Analyst Reports for Apple, American Express & Starbucks

  • Walmart, Apple warn of coronavirus hit to bottom line
    Yahoo Finance

    Walmart, Apple warn of coronavirus hit to bottom line

    Yahoo Finance is maintaining a working list companies that have been affected by the outbreak, and are expected to feel the effects through the first half of the year.

  • Fast-food companies in China step up ‘contactless’ pickup, delivery as coronavirus rages
    Reuters

    Fast-food companies in China step up ‘contactless’ pickup, delivery as coronavirus rages

    NEW YORK/BEIJING (Reuters) - With the coronavirus outbreak in China continuing to spread, McDonald's Corp , Starbucks Corp and other fast-food companies are ramping up "contactless" pickup and delivery services to keep their workers and customers safe, the companies said. McDonald's has implemented contactless pickup and delivery of Big Macs, fries and other menu items across the China as the outbreak has unfolded.

  • PepsiCo CFO: Coronavirus has little impact on sales
    Yahoo Finance

    PepsiCo CFO: Coronavirus has little impact on sales

    PepsiCo CFO Hugh Johnston discusses with Yahoo Finance how the coronavirus has impacted results in China for the beverage and snacks giant.

  • CEO of Burger King owner: 'We are all in' on plant-based foods
    Yahoo Finance

    CEO of Burger King owner: 'We are all in' on plant-based foods

    Restaurant Brands CEO Jose Cil tells Yahoo Finance peak plant-based foods hasn't happened.

  • Coronavirus fears shutter about 50% of Burger King locations in China
    Yahoo Finance

    Coronavirus fears shutter about 50% of Burger King locations in China

    Yahoo Finance catches up with Restaurant Brands CEO Jose Cil fresh off the company's fourth quarter earnings call.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, JD.com, Starbucks and Apple
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, JD.com, Starbucks and Apple

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, JD.com, Starbucks and Apple

  • 3 Things to Know About the Q4 Earnings Season
    Zacks

    3 Things to Know About the Q4 Earnings Season

    3 Things to Know About the Q4 Earnings Season

  • Here comes the Dunkin 'power muffin' to help solve one key problem
    Yahoo Finance

    Here comes the Dunkin 'power muffin' to help solve one key problem

    Dunkin Brands will bet more on snacking in 2020, CEO David Hoffmann tells Yahoo Finance.

  • Bloomberg

    Ireland Still Refuses to Answer the $14.5 Billion Tax Question

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Question: Which economic headwind is projected to cost Ireland some 2 billion euros ($2.2 billion) between now and 2025? No, not Brexit. The answer is corporate tax reform.Last month, Ireland’s finance minister Paschal Donohoe, whose ruling party Fine Gael is struggling in opinion polls ahead of Saturday’s general election, raised this red flag as one of several global risks threatening the small, trade-reliant country of 4.9 million people. As the international loopholes allowing elaborate tax-dodging schemes — made famous by the likes of Starbucks Corp., Apple Inc. and Alphabet Inc. — gradually get closed, and as countries around the world start to overhaul the way taxes are collected, Donohoe warned that Ireland should budget for an estimated 500 million-euro hit every year from 2022. His country has been a magnet for the “tax-optimizing” plans of international companies via its 12.5% corporate tax rate and other perks.This may sound like a relatively gentle readjustment, given the slow pace and complex nature of OECD-led tax talks between 135 countries. But the emergence of two ideas — a fairer allocation of corporate profits to where customers and sales are actually located, and a minimum global corporate tax rate — has rattled the Irish. As a domestic consumer market Ireland is tiny, meaning it would probably get less profit to tax. And with a corporate tax rate that’s lower than that of the G20 and most European Union members, a shift to a minimum global levy would reduce Ireland’s attractiveness to multinational companies.You’d hope that this might lead to some national soul-searching. Prime Minister Leo Varadkar’s Fine Gael and its historic rival Fianna Fail have spent the past few years ensuring Ireland’s wagon is hitched firmly to a low-tax model — one that, according to one research paper, sucked an estimated $100 billion in corporate profits away from other countries in 2015 alone. Sure, the taxes are lucrative, bringing in 10.9 billion euros last year, and are redistributed fairly. But at what cost?The Irish economy is increasingly distorted by its dependence on foreign firms, which account for 80% of corporate taxes and some 10.5% of local jobs(2) , and which offer workers generous accommodation packages even as house prices soar. Domestic companies, meanwhile, are seeing their productivity fall. Ireland’s decision to stand with Apple after the European Commission demanded the company pay $14.5 billion in illegally-avoided taxes shows the power and influence of U.S. tech in particular.Saturday’s election won’t be fought on corporate tax, however. Neither Fianna Fail nor Fine Gael — known as Tweedledum and Tweedledee — see any reason to change Ireland’s economic model, nor its 12.5% rate. Donohoe says careful planning and running a budget surplus is preparation enough. Smaller parties Sinn Fein and the Greens, which have enjoyed a bounce in the polls, are calling for more taxes on property and the rich but would keep the 12.5% levy. Labour, while saying it wants the 12.5% rate to be an “effective” rate (not just a headline one), says it’s open to lowering that rate depending on where companies invest.The importance of foreign direct investment to Ireland’s economy explains why far-reaching tax reform hasn’t quite reached the Irish Overton window, even as voters get more exercised about inequality. Ireland’s recent history is dominated by booms and busts: Squeezing a source of national wealth and jobs might seem self-harming. Even the do-gooder (and famously tax-efficient) rock star Bono once said: “Tax competitiveness has brought our country the only prosperity we’ve known.”But there’s something of the boiled frog about Ireland’s stance, where the heat is being turned up so slowly it will only realize what’s happening too late. A structural shift on global tax rules could be accompanied by a worse-than-expected Brexit outcome. The EU has stood by Ireland during the British negotiations, but that may change once they are over: Other member states aren’t thrilled by Dublin’s tax regime.U.S. President Donald Trump might intensify his trade war on the EU, or pressure American companies to bring jobs and cash back home. The tech firms that populate Dublin might face more EU tax and antitrust rulings. The Irish economy is so dependent on U.S. companies that Goodbody Stockbrokers’ economist Dermot O’Leary calls it “the 51st State.”What can be done? Dropping the appeal against the Apple fine and bringing those billions into the state’s coffers would be a start — all parties, not just Sinn Fein, should be advocating this. Taking a proactive part in OECD-led efforts to revamp tax rules would also help. And spending more on skills, education and housing might make Ireland more attractive to investors at home and abroad, regardless of where tax rates go. Clearly, Ireland will always depend heavily on the wider world. Yet that world is finally waking up on fair taxation.(1) This relates specifically to "FDI-assisted jobs,"involvingcompanies that work through Ireland’s FDI agency.To contact the author of this story: Lionel Laurent at llaurent2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Brussels. He previously worked at Reuters and Forbes.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Bill Ackman Sells Stake in Starbucks After Pershing Makes 73% Return

    (Bloomberg) -- Activist investor Bill Ackman has exited his position in Starbucks Corp., arguing in his annual investor presentation that the company is now “firing on all cylinders” after a successful turnaround.The billionaire said in the presentation Wednesday that Pershing Square Capital Management’s investment in the Seattle-based coffee giant returned 73% over 19 months. Prospective returns could “become more modest,” he said.Starbucks “should continue to generate robust earnings growth through one of the world’s most dominant, attractive and profitable brands,” according to the presentation.Starbucks fell as much as 2% in New York trading Wednesday. The shares were trading at $87.40, down 1.1%, at 12:55 p.m.Starbucks U.S. same-stores sales have surpassed his expectations, with average growth of 5% over the course of Pershing Square’s investment, Ackman said, crediting cold beverage innovation as well as in-store operations. He also highlighted an “impressive” performance in China despite intense competition and bold actions by management to improve investor returns, including share buybacks.Discussing his investment in Agilent Technologies Inc. for the first time, Ackman said the company is undervalued and that his firm built its position at an average cost of $76.58 per share, or a 10% discount to current levels. In November, he said his stake in the life sciences equipment maker amounted to about 8% to 9.5% of Pershing Square’s portfolio, or roughly $665 million at the time. He didn’t disclose the size of the position Wednesday.“We believe Agilent’s current valuation represents a discount to intrinsic value and does not fully reflect the company’s high-quality business model, increasing mix of recurring revenue, strong long-term growth potential and significant margin expansion opportunity,” the presentation states.He said he believes there’s potential for a 800 basis point margin improvement at the company based on its best-in-class peers, and that the company could take on more debt to generate more capital.Pershing Square finished 2019 with its strongest performance on record, reporting a 58% return on its investments. Big gains were made on its investments in Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc., Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and others, it said. The firm had roughly $8.6 billion in assets under management at year end.The first month of 2020 hasn’t been as strong, with the firm reporting a 1.3% decline on investments through Jan. 31, according to its website.(Updates with additional background starting in fourth paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Scott Deveau in New York at sdeveau2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Fournier, Matthew MonksFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Starbucks Challenger Luckin Isn’t All Out of Luck

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- China’s Luckin Coffee Inc. hasn’t been having much luck lately. The last thing a retail business in the middle of a breakneck expansion needs is a deadly virus that keeps consumers off the streets and away from malls. What could be more damaging? Perhaps an attack by short-sellers branding your business a fraud.Shares in Nasdaq-listed Luckin Coffee plummeted 11% Friday after Carson Block’s Muddy Waters Capital tweeted that it has a short on the stock, citing an unattributed 89-page report it had received that alleged the chain has accounting issues and a broken business model. It could have been worse. Luckin shares were down as much as 27% before rival short-selling firm Citron Research defended the company, saying it was long the stock and the coffee chain’s business in China was “on fire.” Luckin called the allegations “misleading and false” in a filing Monday. Its shares closed 3.5% lower.Whatever the merits or otherwise of the anonymous report — which Muddy Waters said it found credible and Andrew Left’s Citron said would “fall short on accuracy” — Luckin faces serious challenges from the coronavirus, which has caused some cities in China to impose travel restrictions, manufacturers to halt output and the government to extend the Lunar New Year holiday. At the same time, the coffee chain has a couple of key advantages that should enable it to ride out the disruption.First is its delivery model. Unlike Starbucks Corp., which prides itself on its cozy seating areas, Luckin mostly sells coffee for consumption outside. As of the end of June, 2,741 of 2,963 outlets were “pick-up stores.” Just 123 were so-called relax stores where buyers drink on the premises, and the rest were delivery kitchens.In an environment where authorities are telling people to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus, such a business may prove more resilient than one like Starbucks, which sells coffee partly as a social experience. Seattle-based Starbucks has closed more than half its 4,292 outlets(6) in China because of the viral outbreak. Luckin, which overtook Starbucks with 4,500 stores across the country by the end of last year, hasn’t given comparable figures.Second is Luckin’s financial position. Founded less than three years ago, the company has been expanding at a furious pace, almost quadrupling its number of stores from 1,189 in the third quarter of 2018. Such a rapid build-out is financially draining — especially when the company has a strategy of sacrificing profits by offering discounts to lure customers. That makes Luckin’s January fundraising look particularly fortuitous.The coffee chain raised a combined $778 million from an additional share sale and a convertible bond offering, more than the $645 million it took in from its May initial public offering. It sold shares at $42 each. The stock reached a high of $50.02 on Jan. 17, almost triple the IPO price, and has since dropped more than a third to close at $32.49 on Friday.The opportunely timed sale gives Luckin a war chest to survive the hit to consumption from the virus epidemic, which if it follows the same trajectory as the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak should be contained by summer.To be sure, there are longer-term concerns hovering over Luckin, particularly the sustainability of a business model that appears to rest largely on offering near-permanent discounts. While the advertised price of Luckin’s coffees is from $3.50 to $4 each, most customers pay as much as 50% less in practice. When the company started selling tea in July, it drew business with a “buy 10 get 10 free” promotion. Luckin’s third-quarter loss widened to 484.9 million yuan ($69 million) from 531.9 million yuan a year earlier.For the time being, though, Luckin looks safe.  (Adds Luckin’s statement in the second paragraph.)(1) As of the end of last year.To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Dividend-Paying Stocks for Investors to Buy to Fight Off Market Uncertainty
    Zacks

    3 Dividend-Paying Stocks for Investors to Buy to Fight Off Market Uncertainty

    Check out these three dividend-paying stocks that investors might want to buy to help combat coronavirus-based market pullback fears...

  • You May See Fewer Starbucks Coffee Shops at U.S. Airports: Here’s Why
    Skift

    You May See Fewer Starbucks Coffee Shops at U.S. Airports: Here’s Why

    You soon may see fewer Starbucks stores at U.S. airports, after HMSHost, which operates all of the roughly 400 terminal locations nationwide, severed its nearly 30-year-old exclusivity agreement with the famous coffee chain. Since 1991, HMSHost has been the only concession company that could partner with Starbucks at U.S. airports. Starbucks has been a boon […]

  • Bloomberg

    It’s Only February and We’re Already Miserable

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- February can feel like no man’s land. The holidays are over and the weather is crummy. The gentlest iPhone chime sounds like a bugle call in the morning and you need two Americanos to have a civil conversation. Over the past week or so, you’ve been holed up in your cramped apartment and your inbox is overflowing with alerts about the spread of a deadly virus. Like 84% of the population, you’re probably stressed, according to a recent study by Cigna Corp. and Asia Care Group.The cost of burnout is no longer just emotional. The global economy loses $1 trillion a year in productivity as a result of depression and anxiety, the World Health Organization found. While the U.S. puts $133.2 billion, or 4% of its annual health expenditure, toward treatment, that proportion reaches 19% in Australia, 18% in Singapore and 17.6% in Hong Kong, Cigna says.The good news is that there’s a solution, and it’s cheap. The bad news is that it’s difficult. After years of considering mental health to be a personal affliction, focus is turning to the role employers can play. The type of changes needed – better communication and support from managers, for example – require a shift in attitude more than financial resources. In Asia, however, the very wokefulness that’s made mental health a priority for Fortune 500 CEOs and U.S. presidential candidates is uncomfortable territory.“My family never, ever talked about this topic. It’s a taboo,” said Deborah Seah, a 38-year-old Singaporean who lived with bipolar disorder for more than two decades before it was diagnosed. As a girl of eight, she recalls going to the kitchen of her family’s high-rise apartment in the middle of the night, looking out the 11-story window and fighting the urge to jump.More than 90% of people in Asia say they’re stressed, and eight out of 10 feel like they operate in an “always on” culture. These can be early symptoms of burnout, which is marked by chronic exhaustion, cynicism and detachment from your work, as well as feelings of ineffectiveness.Seah experienced her first burnout episode in 2016, while working at an academic institution. She recalls the rising levels of stress as managers kept pushing work on her plate. She also felt pressure to keep her mental condition under wraps because colleagues gossiped viciously. Managers who knew of Seah’s struggles urged her to stay quiet.Seah remembers breaking into sobs in the washroom, hoping no one would see, and coming home to dinner, where she would erupt into screams. Her husband begged her to quit her job, but she couldn’t let go: “I didn’t want to give up my career,” she said. Seah eventually admitted herself to Singapore’s mental-health institute when she began to feel suicidal. Successive burnout episodes were equally dramatic, with daily panic attacks, hot and cold flashes, uncontrollable shivering and the inability to get out of bed.Beyond social stigmas, Asia’s often inflexible work culture can be a hurdle, too. In a recent survey of Hong Kong employees by Deacons, a law firm, 65% of respondents cited long hours as their primary concern, closely followed by “domineering” senior management and uncommunicative bosses.The trouble is, even flexible work arrangements have their pitfalls. Ben,(1) 43, started his career in public relations in London, and moved to Singapore in 2013. He struggled with depression and anxiety after his father and half-brother died unexpectedly within less than a year of each other. He was relieved to get a transfer to Hong Kong for a change of pace, and was initially encouraged by the corporatespeak about working from home and unlimited vacation time.Very quickly, Ben found that working anywhere meant working all the time. He was pulling 12-hour days and putting in time on weekends; he compulsively checked his phone for messages. A much-anticipated trip with his wife to the tropical island of Flores, east of Bali, was spent on a deck chair: “I saw it over a laptop,” he recalls.It also became apparent that making a big transition during a period of emotional strain was a bad idea. When Ben asked for help with his workload, his manager said he should be able to cope. As the demands increased, Ben’s symptoms became physical: He lost weight, his cheeks hollowed and his skin turned ashen. One day, he simply couldn’t get up, and stayed bedridden for a week.Though Ben worked for a U.S.-based company, he felt caught between Asia’s cultural expectation of being in the office and the 24/7 demands of his industry. “When I was working in London, our general rule was if you saw someone working late regularly, you would take them aside and say, ‘Hey what’s going on? What’s wrong?’ whereas in Asia, it’s celebrated much more.”Ben eventually decided to leave his job and took seven months off. Now he does contract work in the marketing-services industry, and tries to stick to a four-day week.In 2018, Gallup Inc., a market-research company, looked at the main causes of burnout, as well as what employers and managers can do. What’s striking is how simple some of the solutions appear to be: Employees whose managers are willing to listen to their work-related problems are 62% less likely to be burned out, and those who have the opportunity to do projects where they excel are 57% less likely to experience frequent episodes, the study found. Does a trillion-dollar problem really come down to intangibles such as making work purposeful, promoting teamwork and giving positive feedback?Seah, the Singaporean, eventually left her job, and now works as an executive assistant at Oracle Corp. In her application, she included her volunteer work as an ambassador at “Beyond the Label,” a government initiative to raise awareness about mental health. Seah marvels at the California-based company’s openness to her condition and the willingness to let her work from home. “The approach and attitude of my manager makes a whole world of difference.”The workplaces of the future should not only better equip its managers with soft skills, but give employees the time and space to care for themselves. Think about it: With people working well into their 70s, careers can plausibly span half a century; a recent study puts the age of peak unhappiness smack in the middle, at 47.2. The key to heading off burnout, then, may be clearing your calendar. The Wall Street Journal recently chronicled the experience of one insurance executive who took a two-year sabbatical. The break actually accelerated her progress: She returned to work and became a CEO.For those who can’t afford to put their paychecks on pause, even mini breaks or meditation can help. One Singaporean-based app, MindFi, has breathing exercises that even allow skeptics like me to keep their eyes open. Managing stress this way should be natural in cities like Hong Kong and Singapore. After all, “Asia is the home of meditation,” says Bjorn Lee, MindFi’s founder. “What happened?”There’s perhaps no better time to put these tools to work. The spread of the coronavirus has produced stress triggers that are both extraordinary (with thousands of confirmed cases) and mundane (it’s more difficult to get your Starbucks coffee). With millions of people on lockdown, companies from HSBC Holdings Plc to Facebook Inc. have asked staff to work from home. The novelty of wearing your pajamas all day can wear off quickly when you’re squinting at a tiny laptop screen and keeping your toddler’s sticky fingers off the keyboard. But if you’re safe and virus-free, this could be a welcome opportunity for a deep breath. A baby showed up on one of my video conferences last week — I can’t imagine I’m the only one who cracked a smile. (1) Ben asked that we keep out his surname.To contact the author of this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Rachel Rosenthal is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. Previously, she was a markets reporter and editor at the Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of SBUX earnings conference call or presentation 28-Jan-20 10:00pm GMT

    Q1 2020 Starbucks Corp Earnings Call