SBGSF - Schneider Electric S.E.

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
106.35
-0.90 (-0.84%)
At close: 3:07PM EDT
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Previous Close107.25
Open106.65
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range106.35 - 108.10
52 Week Range69.16 - 110.30
Volume118
Avg. Volume2,332
Market Cap58.245B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.08
PE Ratio (TTM)23.29
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateApr. 30, 2019
1y Target EstN/A
  • Workforce training app developer Poka adds strategic investor Schneider Electric
    TechCrunch

    Workforce training app developer Poka adds strategic investor Schneider Electric

    Poka, a workforce training app and software service for industrial companies, has added to its roster of backers SE Ventures, the venture capital arm of the European energy and automation conglomerate Schneider Electric. Since 2014, Poka has been selling its services to companies including Bosch, Danone, Mars, The Kraft Heinz Company, Johnson & Johnson and Stanley Black and Decker, the company said. Previous backers of the Quebec City, Canada -based company include Robert Bosch Venture Capital, Groupe Leclerc and CDPQ, according to the company.

  • Bloomberg

    Creepy Technologies Invade European Workplaces

    (Bloomberg) -- A “Romware Covid Radius bracelet” beeps every time a Tata Steel Ltd. worker in the U.K. or a docker at Belgium’s Antwerp port is within virus-catching distance of someone. At Bouygues SA construction sites and in Sanofi and Schneider Electric SE offices in France employees enter after thermal cameras check their temperatures. Invisible lasers will manage crowds at shopping malls and transport hubs in Spain and France, and some firms will use infection-tracing lanyard devices.As Europeans head back to work, they’re entering a world very different from the one they left. Workplaces from banks and offices to e-commerce warehouses, factories, sports clubs and airports are trying out or installing fever-testing thermal cameras, mask-detection systems and tracking software to prevent a resurgence of the coronavirus that has claimed more than 167,000 lives in the region.The virus has opened the doors to surveillance and monitoring technologies that many fear are here to stay. While such systems have been creeping into people’s lives across the globe -- particularly in Asia, with China’s facial-recognition points system and South Korea’s invasive infection-tracking software -- the trend runs up against Europe’s much-vaunted privacy culture. Europeans trading in privacy for safety now may find the longer-term consequences unacceptable.“The use of mass surveillance infrastructures can lead to a normalization of these highly intrusive tools, and the hasty introduction of apps, devices and cameras will, in the long term, lead to a dissolution of trust between employers and employees,” said Ella Jakubowska, a researcher at internet rights association Edri.Businesses are walking a fine line between keeping people safe and protecting their privacy. The absence of clear guidance from European regulators is forcing companies -- who could also be on the hook if they don’t sufficiently protect workers -- to make “extremely difficult decisions,” according to Daniel Cooper, a partner at law firm Covington and Burling, who advises clients on tech regulation.“The exposure of companies collecting that information goes up because it’s sensitive,” Cooper said. “They also have to balance the privacy rights of the people whose data they’re collecting and get that balance right and not break the law.”About 23% of companies surveyed globally are considering workplace tracking or contact tracing to transition back to on-site work, according to a study published this month by tax and consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, which is testing its own contact tracing tool in its Shanghai office.“As lockdown is lifted, the turn to contact tracing may add a whole new layer of data being accumulated about where we go and what we do,” Andrew Pakes, research director at U.K. Trade union Prospect, wrote in a blog post Tuesday, adding that “the worry in many quarters is that we could be sleepwalking into further surveillance without safeguards in place.”Providers of such monitoring technologies tout them as a safe way to get people back to work and revive economies crushed by lockdowns. While many acknowledge the systems aren’t foolproof, they say infection risk can be capped.“Our bracelets are tools to keep workers safe and to increase performance,” said John Baekelmans, the chief executive officer of Rombit, the Belgian company whose bracelets will add a tracing feature in June to allow Antwerp port doctors to keep track of a possible spread in the virus.Rombit sees the bracelets outlasting the virus as companies use them to track employees’ health and performance. The company says it will supply such devices to 300 companies in the coming weeks.Like Rombit, Krakow, Poland-based Estimote Inc. is selling social-distancing devices to factories, research centers and hospitals, which also let them trace contacts made by any infected staffer.The devices, attached to lanyards, buzz when workers have spent too much time near a colleague. Employees developing symptoms or testing positive can press a button on the gadget to notify the company, allowing it to trace all the people they’ve been in contact with.“It’s in our DNA to come close” to other people, said Estimote CEO Jakub Krzych, adding that the devices alert users to those habits, keeping the spread of the virus in check.Herta Security in Barcelona is developing both mask-detection technology and facial recognition for touch-less access in workplaces, including for a global retail company that’s considering using it in its offices in Europe and Latin America, according to Laura Blanc Pedregal, Herta’s Chief Marketing Officer.Shopping malls and major transport hubs in Spain, France, Israel and the U.S. will be using Paris-based Outsight’s laser technology to ensure social distancing, its president and co-founder Raul Bravo said. Aeroports de Paris, which manages the French capital’s airports, is testing Outsight lasers to monitor passenger flows.Fever-checking thermal cameras are starting to become ubiquitous. Airports including London’s Heathrow and Paris’s Charles de Gaulle are testing them.“We sell more cameras every week,” said Guenther Mull, CEO of German biometrics company Dermalog Identification Systems GmbH, which offers mask detection as an add-on to its software. “The demand is currently very high.”Privacy advocates are alarmed. Thermal cameras could be seen as an invasion of privacy, said Rob van Eijk, managing director for Europe at the Future of Privacy Forum, a nonprofit think tank.“It would pressure individuals with relatively higher body temperatures to disclose or divulge, likely against their will, their personal health information that might be unrelated to Covid-19 or other respiratory viral infections,” he said.In Europe, where breaching data protection laws can result in a fine of as much as 4% of annual global revenue, companies typically wouldn’t link temperature readings to names or store the information. Still, fever readings wouldn’t be difficult to trace back to an individual, said Covington and Burling’s Cooper.For now, the checks are being taken in stride. Consider the employees of Bayer 04 Leverkusen, the German soccer club, which invested in five Dermalog thermal cameras. When the Bundesliga became the first major soccer league to resume playing last weekend, the club was ready. It had been scanning its players when they came in for training.In late April, while much of Germany was sheltering in place, professional soccer player Leon Bailey stood at the entrance of the club’s training facilities to have his temperature taken. The camera zeroed in on his forehead to read a temperature of 37 degrees Celsius. No fever. He passed through the arena’s gates and joined his teammates for practice.“They see it’s for their own safety,” said Dr. Karl-Heinrich Dittmar, Bayer Leverkusen’s medical director, in an interview. “Nobody wants to become ill.”Read More:Boxed Lunches and Cubicles Aplenty for Post-Virus Silicon Valley Paris Tests Face-Mask Recognition Software on Metro Riders(This article previously said cameras were being set up at Madrid’s University Camilo Jose Cela. A spokeswoman for Almas Industries altered her statement after publication to say the cameras were for a separate sports hall within the campus, and have not been installed.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Should Income Investors Look At Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) Before Its Ex-Dividend?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should Income Investors Look At Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) Before Its Ex-Dividend?

    Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) stock is about to trade ex-dividend in 2 days time. If you purchase the stock on or...

  • Schneider Electric sees tough first half, but confident long-term
    Reuters

    Schneider Electric sees tough first half, but confident long-term

    The company, which markets products ranging from electrical car chargers to transformers and production software, reported a smaller-than-expected drop in first-quarter revenue thanks in part to higher software and services sales. The business features prominently in the group's long-term strategy to improve its digital offerings in energy and automation. "As we come out of the crisis we feel very, very confident in our positioning," Schneider's incoming chief financial officer, Hilary Maxson said on a call with reporters.

  • Should We Worry About Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) P/E Ratio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should We Worry About Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) P/E Ratio?

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll apply a basic P/E...

  • Do Schneider Electric S.E.’s (EPA:SU) Returns On Capital Employed Make The Cut?
    Simply Wall St.

    Do Schneider Electric S.E.’s (EPA:SU) Returns On Capital Employed Make The Cut?

    Today we are going to look at Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) to see whether it might be an attractive investment...

  • Is There Now An Opportunity In Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is There Now An Opportunity In Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU)?

    Let's talk about the popular Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU). The company's shares saw a double-digit share price...

  • Schneider Electric confident it can overcome coronavirus hit, shares climb
    Reuters

    Schneider Electric confident it can overcome coronavirus hit, shares climb

    The group, which sees coronavirus costing it around 300 million euros (£251 million) in the first quarter, said the affect would be felt mostly in China, representing about 15% of its revenues, due to factory closures in January and February. "We have 80% capacity reopened for our factories in China," Schneider Chief Financial Officer Emmanuel Babeau told Reuters. Schneider, which markets products ranging from electrical car chargers and lighting control to transformers and production software, expects the impact of the virus to be almost entirely offset throughout 2020, mostly in the second half of the year.

  • Should Schneider Electric (EPA:SU) Be Disappointed With Their 59% Profit?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should Schneider Electric (EPA:SU) Be Disappointed With Their 59% Profit?

    The simplest way to invest in stocks is to buy exchange traded funds. But one can do better than that by picking...

  • At CES, Schneider Electric unveils its own upgrade to the traditional fusebox
    TechCrunch

    At CES, Schneider Electric unveils its own upgrade to the traditional fusebox

    As renewable energy and energy efficiency continue to make gains among cost-conscious consumers, more companies are looking at ways to give customers better ways to manage the electricity coming into their homes. Think of it as a competitor to products from startups like Span, which are attempting to offer homeowners better ways to integrate renewable energy power generation to their homes and provide better ways to route the electricity inside the home, according to Schneider Electric's executive vice president for its Home and Distribution division, Manish Pant.

  • Has Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Earnings Momentum Changed Recently?
    Simply Wall St.

    Has Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Earnings Momentum Changed Recently?

    When Schneider Electric S.E. (ENXTPA:SU) announced its most recent earnings (30 June 2019), I did two things: looked...

  • A Closer Look At Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Uninspiring ROE
    Simply Wall St.

    A Closer Look At Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Uninspiring ROE

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • Bloomberg

    Microsoft Wants to Teach Drones, Robots and Drills How to Think

    (Bloomberg) -- Microsoft Corp. and technology rivals spend a lot of time talking about machine learning. Now Microsoft is talking about something called machine teaching.No, the software maker doesn't plan to send robots into classrooms. In a world where factories and wind farms will increasingly run on autonomous systems, drones will criss-cross cities delivering packages and robots will operate in underground mines, Microsoft wants to make the software that helps mechanical and chemical engineers teach those devices how to behave, where to go and how to maintain safe conditions.Microsoft last year acquired a company called Bonsai that makes this kind of software, merged it with some work from its research arm — a group of Microsoft researchers wrote a paper on this idea back in 2017 — and  is now expanding a software preview so more potential customers can test it. As the company tries to sell more of its Azure cloud software to industrial companies, it aims to make these kinds of autonomous programs a profitable part of that portfolio. Many consumers will be most familiar with this kind of software as it exists in self-driving cars, but Microsoft plans to leave that part of the market to the Teslas of the world.Delta Air Lines Inc. is running a project to improve their baggage handling using the technology, Microsoft will announce Monday. Royal Dutch Shell Plc is trying out the software to control drilling equipment, while Schneider Electric SE is seeing how it works with electric heating and cooling controls for buildings, said Mark Hammond,  founder and chief executive officer of Bonsai, who is now a general manager at Microsoft. A Microsoft partner based near that company’s Redmond, Washington, headquarters wants to use it for tractors and Carnegie Mellon University deployed the software as part of a mine-exploration robot that recently won a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency challenge.  Microsoft has also suggested the software could work well for drones that check power lines and wind turbines and for disaster recovery operations where autonomous devices scout out the situations that may not be safe for human rescuers.“The industry is fixated on autonomous driving and that’s it, but if you look around you in the world, you can find literally hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of scenarios where automation can improve things,” said Gurdeep Pall, Microsoft vice president, business AI.  “A lot of these folks who build these systems are mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, etc. They are not AI people. We are bringing AI to these engineers in a way that they can operate.”In May, Microsoft began a limited preview of the software that extended to about 50 customers. On Monday at Microsoft’s Ignite conference in Orlando, CEO Satya Nadella will announce an expansion of that program to about 200 companies and likely more after that. The company won’t yet say when it will be broadly available.The software allows engineers to set up rules and criteria for how autonomous devices should operate, anything from where a robot arm should start, what it should do next and all the different possibilities. Then engineers use simulation software — either from Microsoft or its partners — to set up a series of lessons, a digital curriculum. “It’s not randomly exploring, it’s exploring in a way that’s guided by the teacher,” Hammond said. And once you have the curriculum, the system automates the process of teaching and learning, across hundreds or thousands of simulations at the same time. Microsoft partner Fresh Consulting is working with several customers to figure out how to program devices and vehicles with Microsoft’s tools. One such customer is  industrial equipment rental company United Rentals, and Fresh wants to use Microsoft’s product to better control compact track loaders, which need to work in uneven terrain and mud. The software can also be useful in construction and warehouse work. “These are dirty, dangerous and dull jobs, and there's not enough people, said CEO Jeff Dance. Microsoft is also partnering with MathWorks Inc., which makes simulation and modeling software used by companies like Toyota and Airbus, to allow its programs to work with Microsoft’s. Microsoft said its autonomous software approach blends the power of human experience with the ability to adapt to changing situations through a type of AI called reinforcement learning. For example, Shell is using the tools to teach its drills. Shell could program drills the old fashioned way, with a series of rules put in by the human experts, Hammond said. But that would require lots of time reprogramming each drill every time it’s used on different terrain. A reinforcement learning system — like those used to teach machines how to play video games better than humans — could learn how to do it alone. But for industrial tasks, reinforcement learning with human knowledge and guidance works better, Hammond said. Without it, systems may come to conclusions that don’t make sense in the real world. Software for factories, equipment and industrial applications is often very specific and made by companies in those industries rather than large, general purpose software makers like Microsoft. And many of those vendors are also working on systems for increasing autonomous control. Microsoft also wants to sell other products, from cloud services to HoloLens augmented reality goggles to construction and industrial firms. Meanwhile its cloud rival Amazon.com Inc. is trying to leverage expertise in logistics and warehouse automation to sell services to industrial companies, said Nick McQuire, an analyst at market research firm CCS Insight. Amazon and Google are also working on AI learning techniques with robots and on programs that promise to enable engineers without AI expertise to program complicated AI models. Rather than try to compete with industrial tech vendors, Microsoft wants to partner with them, Pall said.“It's a big market, but a very difficult one to target in terms of the complexity and the legacy systems, and a lot of those systems are highly mission critical,” McQuire said. “It's going to take some time, but Microsoft is starting to position a lot of its products for it.”Microsoft also made other announcements at the conference including:A new Office mobile app that combines Word, Excel and PowerPoint into one app instead of separate ones. Outlook for iOS will now be able to read a user’s emails out loud and share changes to their day. And now there’s a male voice available instead of Microsoft’s usual female Cortana voice assistant. In a bid to be more helpful, Cortana can now scan users’ email and send a single “briefing” document with all the things they’ve promised to do each day, as well as a summary of meetings and relevant documents.  Microsoft’s Azure cloud division is unveiling a new program for data analytics called Azure Synapse Analytics and new technologies for using Azure tools to manage Linux and Windows Servers located in a customers own data centers or multiple clouds.  To contact the author of this story: Dina Bass in Seattle at dbass2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew Pollack at apollack1@bloomberg.net, Robin AjelloFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • These 4 Measures Indicate That Schneider Electric (EPA:SU) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well
    Simply Wall St.

    These 4 Measures Indicate That Schneider Electric (EPA:SU) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

    Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...

  • Does Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) Have A Place In Your Dividend Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) Have A Place In Your Dividend Portfolio?

    Today we'll take a closer look at Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a...

  • Is Schneider Electric S.E.’s (EPA:SU) 11% Return On Capital Employed Good News?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Schneider Electric S.E.’s (EPA:SU) 11% Return On Capital Employed Good News?

    Today we'll look at Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) and reflect on its potential as an investment. Specifically...

  • Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU): Will The Growth Last?
    Simply Wall St.

    Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU): Will The Growth Last?

    On 30 June 2019, Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) released its earnings update. Generally, it seems that analyst...

  • Reuters

    Schneider Electric posts record first-half core profit, ups guidance

    Schneider's first-half adjusted earnings before interest, tax and amortisation (EBITA) rose 10.9% organically to 1.96 billion euros ( £1.75 billion ), topping analyst consensus for 1.92 billion. The company's energy management division reported solid growth, underpinned by high demand for products and services, particularly in the data centres market across all the regions in which it operates. The residential, commercial and industrial buildings end-market remained strong, while the energy management unit also benefited from higher investments in construction and infrastructure end-markets in China.

  • All You Need To Know About Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Financial Health
    Simply Wall St.

    All You Need To Know About Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Financial Health

    Investors looking for stocks with high market liquidity and little debt on the balance sheet should consider Schneider...

  • If You Had Bought Schneider Electric (EPA:SU) Stock Three Years Ago, You Could Pocket A 40% Gain Today
    Simply Wall St.

    If You Had Bought Schneider Electric (EPA:SU) Stock Three Years Ago, You Could Pocket A 40% Gain Today

    Vanguard founder Jack Bogle helped spearhead the low-cost index fund, putting average returns within reach of every...

  • Interested In Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU)? Here's What Its Recent Performance Looks Like
    Simply Wall St.

    Interested In Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU)? Here's What Its Recent Performance Looks Like

    For long term investors, improvement in profitability and outperformance against the industry can be important...

  • Was Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Earnings Growth Better Than The Industry's?
    Simply Wall St.

    Was Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Earnings Growth Better Than The Industry's?

    Assessing Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) past track record of performance is a valuable exercise for investors. It...

  • What Should We Expect From Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Earnings In The Years Ahead?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should We Expect From Schneider Electric S.E.'s (EPA:SU) Earnings In The Years Ahead?

    The latest earnings announcement Schneider Electric S.E. (EPA:SU) released in December 2018 suggested that the...