PTON - Peloton Interactive, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
68.47
+3.98 (+6.17%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close64.49
Open64.82
Bid68.47 x 900
Ask68.58 x 4000
Day's Range63.80 - 68.78
52 Week Range17.70 - 68.78
Volume9,163,666
Avg. Volume10,657,779
Market Cap19.393B
Beta (5Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-2.11
Earnings DateAug. 03, 2020 - Aug. 13, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est57.70
  • 3 Top U.S. Stocks to Buy in July
    Motley Fool

    3 Top U.S. Stocks to Buy in July

    FedEx (NYSE: FDX), Lululemon (NASDAQ: LULU), and Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) are all quietly making moves that set them up nicely for the future. Interestingly, FedEx and Lululemon have been able to adapt to COVID-19 realities and increase business, while Intel works behind the scenes to deliver advanced technology today. In 2019, FedEx cut ties with Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN), causing many on Wall Street to shake their heads.

  • Why Peloton Stock Popped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Peloton Stock Popped Today

    Shares of Peloton Interactive (NASDAQ: PTON) jumped 6.2% on Friday after its chief financial officer hinted that the home-based fitness equipment maker could soon debut a lower-cost version of its popular treadmill. During Barron's Investing in Tech conference call on Wednesday, Peloton CFO Jill Woodworth said the company was considering a lower-priced treadmill as its next product offering. Investors' excitement over a potential new treadmill product launch drove Peloton's stock higher on Friday.

  • Peloton Says a Cheaper Treadmill Could Be a Rich Opportunity
    Motley Fool

    Peloton Says a Cheaper Treadmill Could Be a Rich Opportunity

    Rumors of cheaper home fitness equipment from Peloton Interactive (NASDAQ: PTON) have gotten more of a workout from analysts than consumers working up a sweat on one of its pricey stationary bikes, but CFO Jill Woodworth says lower-cost equipment might finally be on the drawing board. Despite the cost of its bikes and treadmills, Peloton is still seeing strong consumer demand for them.

  • Who’s Desperate to Get Back to the Gym?
    Bloomberg

    Who’s Desperate to Get Back to the Gym?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When you return to the gym, your workout will be noticeably different than before the coronavirus lockdown. Don’t plan on pumping iron for more than an hour, or taking a shower. And you can probably forget those trendy boxing classes that have you making contact with your fellow gym-goers.Welcome to the new world of fitness, which will be characterized by social distancing, obsessively wiping down equipment and, for those who don’t want to brave the gym, sessions with a virtual coach on a Peloton bike at home.The Covid-19 pandemic has hit something that we largely take for granted: our health. So people are now likely to spend even more of their incomes on well-being, including staying in shape. But with a plethora of choices, from Zoom yoga to ballet barre via Instagram Live, not all of this money may find its way into the traditional fitness sector.That is likely to lead to a shakeout of an industry that has seen the number of global facilities roughly double over the past 15 years. Many clubs could now close or shrink. Those best placed to survive are the trendy boutiques that can successfully pivot to providing digital content and the no-frills operators that can appeal to cash-strapped fitsters.  Some fitness fans can’t wait to get back to the gym. For others, being in close proximity to other people engaging in sweaty exercise is the last place they will feel comfortable. And for now, workout chains remain closed in some parts of the U.S. Clubs in England will be able to open from July 25. Where gyms are trading, they’re limiting the number of people inside at any one time and offering “busyness trackers” on their apps, so customers can decide the best time to visit. At peak hours, people may be asked to book ahead of time, or keep their workouts to an hour. As for showers it’s a mixed picture, depending on particular clubs and locations. Many people are choosing to get changed at home anyway.For gyms, in addition to contending with costly measures to contain the spread of the virus and keep customers feeling safe, it’s a changing landscape in terms of where their customers are and what they may want.Because many fitness centers are located in business districts, there may be far less demand when they reopen as working from home becomes entrenched. Virgin Active, owned by investment holding company Brait SE, whose clubs are mostly in metropolitan areas, looks particularly exposed here. And the new routines people have embraced while at home may lend themselves to working out in one’s kitchen or bedroom, rather than going to the gym at all. Consequently, clubs could face a wave of cancellations.Already, months of closure and higher reopening costs have taken their toll. Bodybuilder favorite Gold’s Gym International Inc. and 24 Hour Fitness Worldwide Inc. have filed for bankruptcy protection. But it is not just the legacy gyms, already caught in the ultimate barbell economy between chic boutiques and budget operators, that are feeling the burn.The boutiques, such as those that specialize in cycling, yoga or Pilates, face unique and acute challenges. The economics of many of these businesses are built around cramming lots of class participants into a tiny space — the kind of set-up people are likely to want to avoid.These fitness outposts are experimenting with ways of hanging onto their members. In a particularly fanciful example, SoulCycle Inc. is offering some outdoor classes in the Hamptons this summer that cost $50 for a single class. In such a posh location, there may be plenty of takers, but that’s hardly a model that can be replicated across the country. And outdoor classes will lose their appeal in the dead of winter.That is why some gyms, both boutiques and big-box outlets, are turning to digital content. Yogaworks Inc., for example, is live-streaming more than 100 daily classes from teachers at their studios all over the U.S. If this becomes really popular, it’s not hard to imagine the company needing to upend its business model, perhaps by reducing its roster of instructors, closing underperforming brick-and-mortar studios and hiring more technologists.Going online is far from a sure bet. It’s a highly competitive space that includes everything from free workouts on YouTube to Nike Inc.’s activity app and subscription programs like Glo and Daily Burn. In the U.K. alone, David Minton of the Leisure Database Company said he counted more than 600 Instagram Live workout classes in one day.It also puts operators in more direct competition with trendy home-workout programs such as the Mirror, which was just acquired by yoga-wear maker Lululemon Athletica Inc. for $500 million, and Peloton Interactive Inc., which has seen such explosive demand for its stationary bikes that it paused advertising back in March while it moved to accelerate its supply chain.The budget sector, which has been booming on both sides of the Atlantic, is not immune to the new pressures either. It faces a future with higher hygiene-related costs, such as the more regular and intensive cleaning of equipment. These may be difficult to accommodate when clubs are typically charging only about 20 pounds ($25) a month.  Even so, companies such as Planet Fitness Inc. in the U.S. and Basic-Fit NV in Europe, as well as U.K. operators The Gym Group Plc and Pure Gym Group Plc, are probably best placed. Their clubs tend to be large, and many are located in suburban areas. In some cases, members are younger, and so may be less cautious about coming back. Pure Gym found that when its clubs reopened in Switzerland, people under 30 were three times more likely to return than those over 50. Yes, some people may ditch their subscriptions as the hard economic impact of the lockdowns hits. But no-frills clubs may also benefit from cash-strapped fitness fans trading down.The result is that even the most nimble, well-situated competitors will have to work up more of a sweat to compete in the Covid-19 era. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Peloton Stock Rose Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Peloton Stock Rose Today

    What happened Shares of Peloton Interactive (NASDAQ: PTON) climbed 3.2% on Thursday. Fears of getting infected with COVID-19 are driving many people to exercise at home -- and Peloton is meeting the surging demand for quality home-based exercise equipment.

  • Why Peloton Stock Surged in June
    Motley Fool

    Why Peloton Stock Surged in June

    Shares of Peloton Interactive (NASDAQ: PTON) surged in June, as demand for the company's connected home-fitness gear and classes continued at sky-high levels even as coronavirus-related restrictions were eased in some parts of the United States. According to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence, Peloton's shares gained 36.9% last month, far outpacing the S&P 500's 1.8% gain over the same period. How hot is Peloton right now?

  • GlobeNewswire

    Digital Connectivity & Collaboration at Scale: From Fitness to Workflows & Healthcare. CEO’s of (PTON), (NEXCF), (RNG), (SMAR) Discuss New Trends Driving Growth.

    Wall Street Reporter, the trusted name in financial news since 1843, has published reports on the latest comments and insights from leaders at Peloton Interactive, Inc. (PTON), NexTech AR (NEXCF) (CSE:NTAR), RingCentral, Inc. (RNG), and Smartsheet Inc. (SMAR). NexTech AR (NEXCF) a featured presenter at Wall Street Reporter’s “NEXT SUPER STOCK” investor conference series, has begun scaling revenues for it’s virtual conference platform, “InfernoAR” which boasts Augmented Reality tech features.

  • Roku and Peloton Are a Match Made in Heaven
    Motley Fool

    Roku and Peloton Are a Match Made in Heaven

    One of this young month's more interesting developments is Peloton Interactive (NASDAQ: PTON) scoring a deal to get on Roku's (NASDAQ: ROKU) platform. Roku has thousands of apps on its streaming hub, so what's one more? Peloton is known mostly for its pricey treadmills and stationary bikes that come with attached monitors for its connected fitness subscribers, so why should anyone need these interactive workouts on a different screen?

  • 3 Top Stocks to Recession-Proof Your Portfolio
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Stocks to Recession-Proof Your Portfolio

    Instead, it should be related to offering a fundamentally superior value proposition for customers. The much more attractive offering will result in rapid customer adoption and large market-share gains, such that growth is almost assured, even if the overall economic pie is shrinking due to a recession. Three companies that meet this criteria are Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN), Peloton (NASDAQ: PTON), and Chewy (NYSE: CHWY).

  • Why Lululemon Athletica's $500 Million Acquisition of MIRROR Makes Perfect Sense
    Motley Fool

    Why Lululemon Athletica's $500 Million Acquisition of MIRROR Makes Perfect Sense

    MIRROR brings a subscription revenue stream and plenty of cross-sell opportunities between the two fitness brands.

  • Did Lululemon Just Show Gap and Dick's Sporting Goods a Way Forward?
    Motley Fool

    Did Lululemon Just Show Gap and Dick's Sporting Goods a Way Forward?

    The ailing retailers might learn something from the athleisure wear company's deep dive into home fitness.

  • 1 Stock That Offers Explosive Potential Gains
    Motley Fool

    1 Stock That Offers Explosive Potential Gains

    The key to finding a stock that offers explosive potential gains is finding a company that has an enormous growth opportunity ahead and a highly profitable future. It can potentially help if it is highly doubted among the investment community. Up until the last couple months, audio streaming giant Spotify (NYSE: SPOT) fit this description perfectly.

  • Has Peloton Interactive (PTON) Outpaced Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?
    Zacks

    Has Peloton Interactive (PTON) Outpaced Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?

    Is (PTON) Outperforming Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?

  • Peloton’s Interactive Classes Now Available on Roku
    Motley Fool

    Peloton’s Interactive Classes Now Available on Roku

    Peloton Interactive (NASDAQ: PTON) is broadening the availability of its online workout classes by making them accessible through Roku (NASDAQ: ROKU), potentially reaching the streaming platform's 40 million active accounts. The Peloton app became available in the U.S. on July 1, is available in Canada today, and will eventually be available in the U.K. Peloton has been seeking ways to bring in more subscribers to its platform.

  • Peloton's Stock Is Still Priced for Perfection
    Motley Fool

    Peloton's Stock Is Still Priced for Perfection

    The connected exercise equipment company will need to keep growing revenue rapidly during a recession to justify its high valuation.

  • Why Roku Shares Jumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Roku Shares Jumped Today

    What happened Shares of Roku (NASDAQ: ROKU) have jumped today, up by 7% as of 12:20 p.m. EDT, after the company introduced a Peloton (NASDAQ: PTON) app on its streaming platform. Users can stream workouts even without owning a Peloton Bike or Tread.

  • ‘It seems like investors are becoming complacent and buying’ winners and losers: strategist
    Yahoo Finance Video

    ‘It seems like investors are becoming complacent and buying’ winners and losers: strategist

    Arian Vojdani, Investment Strategist at MV Financial, joins The First Trade to discuss his views on the markets and where investors should be looking.

  • 3 Tech Stocks That Are Thriving Amid Coronavirus
    Motley Fool

    3 Tech Stocks That Are Thriving Amid Coronavirus

    Dominant category leaders, strong long-term prospects, and strength in the face of COVID. What more could you ask for?

  • Lululemon Looks Into the Mirror for Its Next Chapter
    Bloomberg

    Lululemon Looks Into the Mirror for Its Next Chapter

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Lululemon Athletica Inc. is stretching itself into a new area of business. The seller of yoga pants and other workout apparel announced late Monday that it had agreed to acquire Mirror, a home-fitness product offering live and on-demand classes as well as personal training, for $500 million. Lululemon CEO Calvin McDonald has said that the startup expects to notch more than $100 million in sales this year and is on track to break even or earn a narrow profit next year.  This deal, of course, does little to boost the top line sales for a company that had $4 billion in revenue last year.  But it is a worthwhile way for Lululemon to test its ability to move beyond its core retailing expertise. After securing at least $72 million in venture funding and winning some celebrity devotees, Mirror had long been thought of as a potentially powerful disruptor in the fitness business. But now that the pandemic has pushed legions of consumers to explore at-home exercise, its prospects look even brighter. It seems likely that gyms and boutique fitness studios – places where people do lots of heavy breathing in close quarters – will be among the last establishments consumers feel comfortable returning to as the economy reopens. This will be especially true if we see more reports like one earlier this week that a patron to a Planet Fitness gym in West Virginia may have exposed more than 200 people to the novel coronavirus.  In other words, the total addressable market for the Mirror has suddenly exploded.   In addition to paying nearly $1,500 for the Mirror, a product that mounts on your wall like a mirror or stands in your living room, customers pay a $39 monthly subscription for access to classes. That recurring revenue makes for an attractive business model with strong profitability potential. One of the most impressive aspects of a larger but similar at-home fitness pioneer, Peloton Interactive Inc., has been how sticky its subscriptions have proved to be. If Mirror can achieve anything close to that, it will provide a predictable stream of cash for its new corporate parent. Lululemon has long used in-store yoga classes and running clubs to connect with its customers, and the Mirror acquisition is essentially an extension of that tactic for nurturing shopper loyalty and awareness. It’s easy to imagine ways the brands can cross-promote each other, such as with Mirrors set up for trial in Lululemon shops or with Mirror instructors wearing Lululemon gear in their classes.  Simply having entree to Lululemon’s far larger customer base could turbocharge Mirror’s growth. There are certainly ways this acquisition could end up doing little to drive either business forward. Lululemon’s prowess selling clothing may not translate well to scaling what is essentially a hardware and software business. And Lululemon still gets a relatively small share of its sales from outside the U.S. and Canada, so it doesn’t have particularly deep experience in overseas markets, something that might be helpful to Mirror as it aims to grow. Overall, though, they seem like good partners to collaboratively court the kind of consumer that can shell out $98 for leggings and $1,500 for exercise equipment.I always groan at the term “lifestyle brand,” because everyone in retail seems to think they are one and so few truly are. By expanding into home fitness, Lululemon looks more and more like a rare company that actually deserves that designation. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Lululemon to buy at-home fitness system Mirror for $500 million
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Lululemon to buy at-home fitness system Mirror for $500 million

    On Monday, lululemon announced that it is going to acquire at-home fitness startup Mirror for $500 million. Of the acquisition, CEO Calvin McDonald said “it is an exciting opportunity to build upon that vision, enhance [its] digital and interactive capabilities, and deepen [its] roots in the sweatlife.” LULU shares jumped on the news after-hours, while Peloton's stock came under pressure. Jared Blikre breaks down the details of the merger, and what it means for trends in home workout alternatives.

  • Buy Soaring & Still Cheap Purple Stock on Coronavirus E-Commerce Growth?
    Zacks

    Buy Soaring & Still Cheap Purple Stock on Coronavirus E-Commerce Growth?

    Purple Innovation (PRPL) shares have skyrocketed since early April to easily outpace the stay-at-home standouts such as Zoom and Peloton...

  • Peloton climbs after Cowen hikes price target to $70
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Peloton climbs after Cowen hikes price target to $70

    Yahoo Finance’s Emily McCormick joins Akiko Fujita to break down Cowen raising its price target on Peloton as the analyst calls the workout equipment company "uniquely well positioned."

  • Trump would be foolish to start another bruising trade war with China: expert
    Yahoo Finance

    Trump would be foolish to start another bruising trade war with China: expert

    It's no surprise president Trump rushed to clarify comments by an advisor on the status of the U.S.-China trade deal.