OXY - Occidental Petroleum Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
40.45
+0.12 (+0.30%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT
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Previous Close40.33
Open40.35
Bid40.45 x 1300
Ask40.59 x 1300
Day's Range40.35 - 41.10
52 Week Range39.97 - 75.79
Volume6,680,163
Avg. Volume9,076,867
Market Cap36.182B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.25
PE Ratio (TTM)7.98
EPS (TTM)5.07
Earnings DateNov. 4, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield3.16 (7.83%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-09
1y Target Est53.48
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
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    Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Occidental Petroleum (OXY) closed at $40.33 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.02% move from the prior day.

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  • Oxy Stock Offers the Buffett Experience (Sort Of)
    Bloomberg

    Oxy Stock Offers the Buffett Experience (Sort Of)

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Occidental Peteroleum Corp. is offering you the chance of a lifetime: to be just like Warren Buffett.Oxy’s stock yields 7.7% and hit 7.9% at one point on Monday. That is roughly four times what the S&P 500 pays. More importantly, it is within a whisker of 8% — the yield Oxy now also pays to one Berkshire Hathaway Inc. These two things are not unrelated.Recall that Oxy won this year’s battle for Anadarko Petroleum Corp. by outbidding Chevron Corp., partly with the aid of $10 billion from Berkshire. This came with the usual payday-loan accoutrements of that high yield, a takeout premium and warrants. Buffett’s cash also helped Oxy avoid putting the deal to its own shareholders — although many appear to have voted it down anyway, in a manner of speaking:Oxy’s stint in the doghouse partly reflects fear, with oil dropping just as Oxy’s debt ballooned. For at least the next year or so, the equity story looks yoked to the twists and turns of the trade war, which is as unsettling as it sounds.More importantly, though, Oxy’s bet on Anadarko has put it at loggerheads with what investors want from oil companies these days.What do they want? Dividends. More to the point, investors have reset the parameters of what’s acceptable in terms of how oil companies apportion cash flow. Poor returns on prior investment by the industry plus concerns about a looming peak in oil demand add up to investors wanting more of that cash directed into their own pockets rather than into drilling budgets. Oil majors have adjusted accordingly:Broadly, there are three claimants on cash flow: the company (capex), creditors (interest and principal) and shareholders (dividends). The sector zeitgeist is to minimize the first two to make more room for the latter.Oxy was an exemplar of this, but the Anadarko deal has changed the equation. Even allowing for disposals announced so far and a joint-venture payment from Ecopetrol SA, pro forma net debt has virtually tripled from Oxy’s standalone level. The extra leverage will haunt Oxy if 2020 turns out to be bad for oil prices – and based on the market’s remarkably sanguine reaction to the recent attack on Saudi Arabia, it might well be.To counter this, Oxy says a round of oil-price hedging means it can cover its dividend if West Texas Intermediate crude oil averages in the low $40s per barrel next year (it’s averaged about $57 so far in 2019). By 2021, Oxy says, it could break even at $40 a barrel without hedging as various efficiencies kick in. Consensus forecasts compiled by Bloomberg show Oxy generating just over $3 billion of free cash flow in 2020 versus a pro forma dividend payment (assuming it stays flat) of just over $2.8 billion.The caveat to this resilience case is that it would mean Oxy cutting back on capex to “maintenance” levels, implying little or no growth. Oxy raised its guidance for third-quarter production by 3% on Tuesday morning, which is positive. But if weak oil prices portend a flat line for the next year or so, then investors’ demand for that high dividend yield wouldn’t be going anywhere.The added fixed costs of higher interest payments and the Berkshire dividend have made Oxy more of a levered play on oil prices at a time when the latter look lifeless. Oxy’s most recent earnings presentation emphasized billions of excess cash (and growth) in 2021 if oil averages $60 or $70 a barrel. In the meantime, though, a big chunk of any value from the Anadarko deal accrues to Buffett. Of the $2 billion of annual pre-tax cost savings (“synergies”) from the deal, $800 million goes post-tax to servicing those preferreds. Indeed, factor in the warrants and take-out premium, plus the $1 billion break-up fee paid to Chevron — along with some other assumptions (1) — and while Oxy’s legacy shareholders get 50% of the net present value of the synergies, Berkshire takes 40%.(2)Oxy expects another $1.5 billion of capex synergies from the Anadarko deal, although this figure came with lower growth guidance so the actual gain in value is less clear, especially if the budget gets slashed toward maintenance levels in the near term.An earnings call is due in three weeks, and Oxy will need to double down on the reassurance it gave in early August. Progress on disposals to cut debt would help. An obvious choice is the stake in Western Gas Partners LP inherited from Anadarko. But this hasn’t materialized yet, and the value of the common units held in Western Gas has dropped by $1.9 billion since the bidding for Anadarko got underway in April. Absent that, details on alternative candidates are needed.Perhaps more importantly, Oxy must make a robust case for synergies coming through sooner rather than later. The current narrative of resilience and leverage to higher oil prices offers some defense against worries about the dividend’s sustainability. However, the oil-price option gets little traction in the current environment where investors are focused on cash today rather than theoretical windfalls tomorrow. Having tilted the cash flow math toward interest and those Buffett payments, Oxy is in a race to show something tangible for its own shareholders coming through from this deal. Looking at that dividend yield, they require some convincing.(1) Assumespreferreds are redeemed for 105% of face value on the 10th anniversary of the deal and all dividends have been paid in full with no accruals. Warrants valued at $542 million using the Bloomberg options calculator as of August 9, 2019 (day of Anadarko acquisition's completion) and assumed to convert to a pro forma stake in Oxy of 8.1%. Tax rate of 21% and cash flows discounted at 10%.(2) Anadarko's legacy shareholders get just under 10%.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at ldenning1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Should Value Investors Consider Occidental Petroleum (OXY)?
    Zacks

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  • Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Occidental Petroleum (OXY) closed at $41.03, marking a +0.47% move from the previous day.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Occidental to Announce Third Quarter Results Monday, November 4, 2019; Hold Conference Call Tuesday, November 5, 2019

    HOUSTON, Oct. 10, 2019 -- Occidental Petroleum Corporation (NYSE:OXY) will announce its third quarter 2019 financial results after close of market on Monday, November 4, 2019,.

  • Does Occidental Petroleum Corporation's (NYSE:OXY) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Occidental Petroleum Corporation's (NYSE:OXY) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?

    This article is written for those who want to get better at using price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll look at...

  • The Oil Majors Leading The M&A Boom In Oil And Gas
    Oilprice.com

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  • GlobeNewswire

    Occidental starts up first-of-its-kind solar facility directly powering oil and gas operations

    Occidental (OXY) today announced the start-up of the company’s first solar facility to directly power an enhanced oil recovery field operation in the Permian Basin. The company, through its Oxy Low Carbon Ventures (OLCV) subsidiary, also announced that it has signed a long-term power purchase agreement for 109 MW of solar energy, beginning in 2021, for use in its Permian operations.

  • Occidental Petroleum Divests Non-Core Assets to Lower Debt
    Zacks

    Occidental Petroleum Divests Non-Core Assets to Lower Debt

    Occidental Petroleum (OXY) continues to sell non-core assets, and focus on higher-margin and high-return production from Permian resources.

  • Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know

    Occidental Petroleum (OXY) closed at $42.96 in the latest trading session, marking a -1.85% move from the prior day.

  • Elliott's Marathon Fight Spells Trouble for MLPs
    Bloomberg

    Elliott's Marathon Fight Spells Trouble for MLPs

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As the fight for Marathon Petroleum Corp.’s future intensifies, collateral damage looms for an already battle-scarred asset class: master limited partnerships.Elliott Management Corp.’s call for splitting Marathon in three has garnered support from a couple of other shareholders now pushing CEO Gary Heminger to step down. Marathon’s board says it stands behind Heminger, but the persistent discount in the stock versus its sum-of-the-parts value should keep the issue of a corporate overhaul alive. While the future of retail arm Speedway looks like the most contentious area, Elliott’s suggestion of converting Marathon’s MLP, called MPLX LP, into a regular C-Corp and spinning it off looks less controversial.Such conversions have become commonplace. Problems with governance, debt, tax reform and general energy exposure have crushed MLP valuations, eroding their main reason for existing, namely as a cheap source of capital. MPLX now sports a distribution yield of about 9.5%. Converting to a C-Corp, as many others have done, would open up a wider pool of investors.That could be great for MPLX; less so for MLPs.I wrote here back in May about the shrinking MLP pool. Since then, a few partnerships have disappeared, including Andeavor Logistics LP, which was bought by MPLX. Meanwhile, Tallgrass Energy LP has received a buyout offer (of sorts), and Kinder Morgan Canada Ltd. should disappear by the end of the year. Plus, with Occidental Petroleum Corp. trying to pay off the debt from its acquisition of Anadarko Petroleum Corp., Western Midstream Partners LP also could be exiting the scene.Here are updated charts breaking down 83 North American energy infrastructure companies (not including utilities) into their respective groups, weighted by market cap and free float. The dominance of the C-Corps is pretty clear: An MPLX conversion would have a big impact. With a market cap of roughly $30 billion(1), MPLX represents about 11% of North American energy partnerships’ aggregate value. It’s also the largest member of the Alerian MLP Index. Assume MPLX converts and is spun off, plus Buckeye Partners LP(2), Tallgrass, Kinder Morgan Canada and Western Midstream all disappear. Under that scenario, C-Corps would jump from about 62% of the aggregate free float of energy infrastructure firms to more than two-thirds. Meanwhile, outside of C-Corps and the big four, we would be left with a long tail of 61 companies with a combined free float of just $48 billion, averaging less than $800 million each.And the dwindling ranks of the Alerian MLP index would thin further; MPLX, Tallgrass and Western Midstream account for a fifth of its weighting. The relative weighting of smaller partnerships with lower-quality midstream assets would increase. For example, all else equal, Genesis Energy LP, which houses everything from soda-ash production to pipelines to shipping, could enter the top 10 of the index’s holdings.A vicious cycle is at work here. As generalist investors have withdrawn, so MLP valuations have remained subdued despite some recovery in energy prices and continued growth in U.S. physical energy flows. This, along with governance concerns, persuades more partnerships to either sell out or give up on the structure, reducing the pool of available investments, which in turn leads to investment mandates and specialist funds migrating away.Earlier this month, large pension funds in Iowa and Oklahoma effectively eliminated asset allocations to MLPs, with Teachers’ Retirement System of Oklahoma noting a number of drawbacks, including an “extremely small universe of securities relative to other asset classes.” In his latest weekly roundup of the sector, Hinds Howard at CBRE Clarion Securities noted that after a year of trying to deal with weak performance and growing concentration, institutions are “throwing in the towel,” with allocations “being diverted to listed infrastructure strategies, private equity or just plain old global equities.” He adds:MLPs have lost the special designation as a separate allocation within real assets that the sector has enjoyed over the years. That fund flow headwind is the biggest impediment to midstream performance [for] the rest of 2019, especially if oil prices are going to remain a headwind.Of course, even if MLPs are shrinking in importance, the hard assets they own remain and can be invested in under other structures. BP Capital Fund Advisors LLC is touting the catchily named UBS E-TRACS NYSE Pickens Core Midstream Index ETN, which includes allocations to C-Corps, with a recent report subtitled: “Is your midstream exchange traded product still relevant?” Some funds have taken an holistic approach to energy infrastructure for years, notably the First Trust North American Energy Infrastructure Fund, which mixes partnerships with C-Corps and even utilities, and the Voya CBRE Global Infrastructure Fund, which extends beyond energy-related infrastructure.Looking at the relative performance, it isn’t hard to see why. And as more MLP constituents either change identity or leave altogether, more institutional money will follow.\- With graphics by Elaine He (1) All data are as at the market close on September 26, 2019.(2) IFM Investors agreed to buy Buckeye for $11.1 billion (including assumed debt) in May 2019, with completion expected by the end of the year.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at ldenning1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Occidental Provides Update on Divestiture and Deleveraging Initiatives

    Occidental Petroleum Corporation (“Occidental” or “the Company”) (OXY) today provided an update on its divestiture and deleveraging initiatives following the recent close of its acquisition of Anadarko Petroleum (“Anadarko”) on August 8, 2019. Sale of Anadarko’s Mozambique LNG Stake to Total: Occidental has completed the sale of Anadarko’s Mozambique LNG stake to Total S.A. (“Total”) (TOT), for $3.9 billion.

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  • Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Flat As Market Sinks: What You Should Know
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  • Oilprice.com

    Who Is To Blame For The Decline In Permian Production?

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  • Should You Worry About Occidental Petroleum Corporation's (NYSE:OXY) CEO Salary Level?
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  • Elephants Elusive: Should Buffett Seek a Smaller Animal?
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  • Bloomberg

    Blackstone, Apollo Are Said to Eye Western Midstream Stake

    (Bloomberg) -- Blackstone Group Inc. and Apollo Global Management Inc. are interested in bidding for a majority stake in Western Midstream Partners LP being sold by Occidental Petroleum Corp., according to people familiar with the matter.Global Infrastructure Partners and KKR & Co. are also interested, said the people, who asked to not be identified because the matter isn’t public. Apollo is considering investing in the oil and gas pipeline operator through Spartan Energy Acquisition Corp., a special purpose acquisition vehicle it backs, the people said.A deal could be reached by the end of this year, they said. Nothing has been finalized and Occidental could opt to keep full ownership of the company, they said.Representatives for Blackstone, Apollo, Global Infrastructure Partners and KKR declined to comment. Representatives for Occidental, Western Midstream and Spartan didn’t respond to requests for comment.Western Midstream fell 1% to $26.54 at 12:09 p.m. in New York trading Thursday, for a market value of $12 billion.Western Midstream, based in the Woodlands, Texas, has more than 15,200 miles of oil and gas pipelines and about six dozen processing and treatment facilities in the Midwestern U.S. and Texas, according to an investor presentation in May.Occidental Petroleum acquired a majority stake in the company via its purchase last month of Anadarko Petroleum Corp., which had formed the company to house its pipeline operations. The potential divestiture would help Occidental meet its goal of selling $10 billion to $15 billion in assets over the next two years to pay down debt.(Updates share price in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Kevin Crowley.To contact the reporter on this story: Kiel Porter in Chicago at kporter17@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Matthew Monks, Simon CaseyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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