JPM - JPMorgan Chase & Co.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
107.76
-0.90 (-0.83%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

107.80 +0.04 (0.04%)
After hours: 7:41PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close108.66
Open108.68
Bid107.80 x 1400
Ask107.89 x 2200
Day's Range107.67 - 108.98
52 Week Range91.11 - 119.24
Volume18,645,142
Avg. Volume11,666,621
Market Cap349.52B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.22
PE Ratio (TTM)11.63
EPS (TTM)9.27
Earnings DateJul 16, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield3.20 (2.94%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-07-03
1y Target Est118.84
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • JPMorgan Chase (JPM) Stock Moves -0.83%: What You Should Know
    Zacks3 hours ago

    JPMorgan Chase (JPM) Stock Moves -0.83%: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, JPMorgan Chase (JPM) closed at $107.76, marking a -0.83% move from the previous day.

  • JPMorgan Sees Client Interest in JPM Coin for Bond Transactions
    Bloomberg20 hours ago

    JPMorgan Sees Client Interest in JPM Coin for Bond Transactions

    (Bloomberg) -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. is seeing interest from clients in the U.S., Europe and Japan on the potential for its prototype digital coin to speed up trading of securities such as bonds.JPM Coin could enable “instant” delivery of bonds on a blockchain platform, said Umar Farooq, head of digital treasury services and blockchain at the U.S. bank. “We believe that a lot of securities over time, in five to 20 years, will increasingly become digital or get tokenized,” he said in an interview in Tokyo.Unveiled in February, JPM Coin is pegged to the U.S. dollar and uses the bank’s private blockchain. JPMorgan has been testing the token to enable institutional clients to transfer payments instantly, it said at the time.The idea of using blockchain to speed up trading settlement isn’t new: stock exchanges from Hong Kong, Australia and Canada are among those that are exploring the possibility. The race to develop digital coins reached a new level earlier this month when Facebook Inc. announced plans for a cryptocurrency called Libra, which will be backed by assets including bank deposits.Read why Facebook chose the stablecoin path to cryptoFor bond transactions, JPM Coin would allow traders to instantly deliver the securities in exchange for cash, according to Farooq. The buyer purchases JPM Coins in advance, putting them in their JPMorgan deposit account, while the seller’s bonds are represented by tokens. Computer programs on a blockchain platform then complete the transaction.The time savings could be significant. For now, it usually takes a seller of Japanese government bonds two days to electronically deliver them to the buyer in exchange for cash, said Shuichi Ohsaki, chief rates strategist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch in Tokyo.JPMorgan will probably begin pilot testing JPM Coin with a few clients to see how it helps to quickly transfer money between them, Farooq said. The testing could take place around the end of the year if relevant regulators approve it, he added.To contact the reporters on this story: Takashi Nakamichi in Tokyo at tnakamichi1@bloomberg.net;Takako Taniguchi in Tokyo at ttaniguchi4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Marcus Wright at mwright115@bloomberg.net, Russell WardFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bernie Sanders Proposes Taxing Wall Street to Pay Student Debts
    Bloomberg2 days ago

    Bernie Sanders Proposes Taxing Wall Street to Pay Student Debts

    (Bloomberg) -- Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is proposing canceling the nation’s outstanding $1.6 trillion of student debt and offsetting the cost with a tax on Wall Street transactions.The Vermont senator said Monday that his plan would provide debt relief to some 45 million Americans who have college loans. It would include a 0.5% tax on stock transactions, a 0.1% tax on bond trades and a .005% tax on derivatives transactions.Sanders’s proposal, which comes ahead of this week’s Democratic debates, also would provide states $48 billion annually to eliminate undergraduate tuition and fees at public colleges and universities, a longstanding Sanders campaign promise. Democratic House lawmakers including Representatives Anouilh Omar of Minnesota and Pyramidal Jayapura of Washington will introduce the legislation to their own chamber Monday.Sanders called it a “revolutionary” initiative that would curb student debt and boost the economy by freeing overly indebted consumers to spend on goods and services.“This proposal completely eliminates student debt in this country and ends the absurdity of sentencing an entire generation, a millennial generation, to a lifetime of debt for the crime of doing the right thing,” Sanders said.The proposal represents the latest attempt by Democrats to tame what some economists and bankers have deemed a growing threat to U.S. economic growth. Relentless tuition hikes and cutbacks in government spending have propelled student debt loads to triple since 2007, eclipsing car loans and credit cards as Americans’ second-largest source of household debt behind home mortgages. That’s prompted policy makers such as Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and executives such as JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon to worry aloud that young Americans’ indebtedness is hurting the property market and overall economy.Sanders’s plan relies on a proposed tax that has been repeatedly rejected by Wall Street and Washington on the grounds that it would stifle growth. Taxing financial transactions “is effectively a sales tax on investors,” Kenneth E. Bent sen Jr., chief executive officer of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, said in an online commentary published this month. “Such a tax never raises anywhere close to the revenue promised, while wreaking havoc for investors and markets,” Bentsen said.Coming DebatesSanders has been amplifying his embrace of government-centered solutions to policy problems in advance of the Democratic presidential debates Wednesday and Thursday in Miami. Two groups of 10 contenders will face off in a state that often helps decide the White House contest.Sanders helped popularize proposals for tuition-free college during his unsuccessful nomination fight against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2016. A few other Democratic contenders, including Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, have put forth proposals to erase past debts. Warren’s plan would cancel $50,000 in student loan debt for every person with household income under $100,000. It also would provide some forgiveness for those with household income between $100,000 and $250,000.Nearly all Democrats have publicly toyed with the idea of either canceling some student debt or increasing government spending to make some public colleges free for some Americans.Read more about the race to 2020More than 1 million Americans annually default on a student loan, U.S. Department of Education data show, and about 1 in 9 borrowers are at least 90 days late on their debt, the highest delinquency rate among any form of household debt, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The Education Department owns or insures more than 90% of all student debt.Widespread struggles are at least in part a consequence of the fact that virtually anyone can borrow from the U.S. government to pay for college, with effectively little check on their ability to repay. But with joblessness at near record lows, rising wages and a growing national economy, experts question why so many Americans are unable to pay their student loan bills.Sanders’s proposal is meant to highlight his appeal to progressives as he battles frontrunner Joe Biden, the former vice president who’s taking more centrist stands and pointing to past bipartisan work. Sanders is also facing challenges from other progressives among the two dozen Democratic contenders, including Warren, who has been gaining in national and some early primary state polls.Sanders embraced “democratic socialism” in a campaign address this month in Washington. Top Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have sought to emphasize what they say are “socialist” tendencies of Democratic White House contenders as part of their 2020 campaign strategy.(Adds remarks by Sanders in fourth, fifth paragraphs.)To contact the reporters on this story: Laura Litvan in Washington at llitvan@bloomberg.net;Shahien Nasiripour in New York at snasiripour1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, ;Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 18 Participating Banks Emerge Triumphant in Stress Test 2019
    Zacks2 days ago

    18 Participating Banks Emerge Triumphant in Stress Test 2019

    The Federal Reserve releases the Dodd-Frank Act supervisory stress test 2019 (DFAST 2019) results which reflect the stability of the banking system.

  • Banks Stay on Sidelines for Facebook Coin After Apple Pay Struggle
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    Banks Stay on Sidelines for Facebook Coin After Apple Pay Struggle

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. banks might be happy to stay away from Facebook Inc.’s push into cryptocurrencies. For now.The Libra Association, the governing body for the coin, is in talks with lenders around the world to join its ranks. Banks are mostly keeping their distance after seeing tepid consumer reaction to digital wallets such as Apple Pay and regulatory scrutiny of digital currencies.“If Facebook is able to create mass adoption on this platform, then banks will want in,” David Donovan, who leads the global financial-services consulting practice at Publicis Sapient, said in a phone interview. “There’s a business decision they have to make. Facebook is saying the market is not being served well.”Banks were absent when Facebook announced Libra last week, saying that more than two dozen other companies, including payment networks Visa Inc. and Mastercard Inc., joined the project. The social-media giant said Libra will be backed by fiat currencies to provide payment services to the 1.7 billion people worldwide without easy access to banking.Facebook and its 2.4 billion active users are hard for the largest U.S. banks to ignore -- and Citigroup Inc.’s Michael Corbat has said his firm would consider joining Libra if asked. But it’s not the first time a technology giant promised sweeping changes to the payments world.Apple Inc. introduced Apple Pay in 2014 to much fanfare. Banks spent millions promoting the service and created card rewards tied to customer use of the product. In a sign of how eager they were, banks even gave Apple a cut of the coveted interchange fees they earn from each swipe of a card.But five years in, Apple Pay has struggled to take off. Large retailers including Walmart Inc. have been hesitant to accept the technology. And while consumers spent roughly $3 trillion using digital wallets in 2018, almost two-thirds of that spending occurred in China where apps like Alipay and WeChat Pay dominate commerce, according to a report from Juniper Research.“Advanced payment methods haven’t really taken hold unless they’re mandated,” Tim Spenny, a senior vice president at market researcher Magid who has consulted for Facebook and Visa, said in an interview. For him, the question is: “What is the use case or what is the pain point that would cause people to say ‘Hey, I’m going to put money into a cryptocurrency to start paying for things.’”After years spent trying to promote Apple Pay, U.S. banks turned their attention to tap-to-pay cards, which use the same technology while keeping the familiar card product. It’s a recipe that’s worked for JPMorgan Chase & Co. customers.“There’s a big segment that never used mobile wallets, but the moment they got their contactless cards, they’re starting to tap right away,” Abeer Bhatia, president of card marketing, pricing and innovation for the bank, said in an interview last month. “When they have the choice to use either, they’re overwhelmingly using tap-to-pay.”Banks have been conducting their own experiments with cryptocurrencies, such as JPMorgan’s JPM Coin, which is meant to speed up corporate payments. The largest U.S. lenders have also promoted a new real-time payments service spearheaded by The Clearing House.Regulatory ResponseThere have been cases where startups were assessed for compliance lapses. And Libra’s debut drew attention from regulators, as members of the House Financial Services Committee and the Senate Banking Committee promised hearings on the digital coin and its governance.John Smith, who used to lead the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, said tech companies and the banks they work with “will be held accountable” if they violate the law.“There’s a view within the fintechs that, ‘We couldn’t possibly do the rules that big banks do because we’re trying to be quick,’” Smith, co-head of Morrison & Foerster’s national security law practice, said Friday at a conference. “There’s going to be a rude awakening.”\--With assistance from Lananh Nguyen, Michelle F. Davis and Kurt Wagner.To contact the reporter on this story: Jenny Surane in New York at jsurane4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, Dan Reichl, Daniel TaubFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com5 days ago

    The Biggest Banks in the U.S. Just Passed Their ‘Stress Test’

    The largest banks in the U.S.—including Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Citigroup, and JPMorgan—have sufficient capital that would allow them to weather a severe recession, the Federal Reserve said.

  • Business Wire5 days ago

    JPMorgan Chase Announces 2019 Dodd-Frank Act Stress Test Results

    JPMorgan Chase & Co. has released the results of its company-run 2019 Dodd-Frank Act Stress Test.

  • Largest U.S. banks clear first round of 'stress tests,' fewer banks tested
    Yahoo Finance5 days ago

    Largest U.S. banks clear first round of 'stress tests,' fewer banks tested

    The Fed released the first round of stress tests for this year, showing that banks have cleaned up their balance sheets. But regulatory changes meant fewer banks were tested this year.

  • Barrons.com5 days ago

    Can the Big Banks Raise Stock Dividends? We’ll Get a Better Idea Today.

    The annual stress-test report cards for large U.S. financial companies are due out Friday. The consensus is that the banks are largely well-capitalized.

  • African fintech dominates Catalyst Fund’s 2019 startup cohort
    TechCrunch5 days ago

    African fintech dominates Catalyst Fund’s 2019 startup cohort

    The organization announced its 2019 startup cohort and three out of the fourfinance ventures — Chipper Cash, Salutat and Turaco — have an Africa focus(Brazil-based venture Diin, was the fourth)

  • Banks Spend $1 Trillion on Digital, But Few Reap the Rewards
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Banks Spend $1 Trillion on Digital, But Few Reap the Rewards

    (Bloomberg) -- While global banks have been pouring money into information technology -- to the tune of $1 trillion over three years -- only a handful appear to be fully committed to a digital transformation and are therefore reaping the benefits, according to an Accenture Plc study.Just 19 of the 161 largest retail and commercial banks that the consulting firm examined have been focusing enough on digital strategies to “make the shift to a different sort of bank,” Accenture said in the report, released Thursday. And those that did were rewarded for their efforts, the firm said.All the banks studied, based in 21 countries, started at roughly similar rates of return on equity in 2011, but by 2017 the banks that Accenture identified as “digital focused” had ROE that rose 0.9 percentage points. The 81 least digitally focused banks, meanwhile, saw their ROE slip 1.1 percentage points -- and Accenture researchers said the gap is likely to continue to widen through 2021. ROE at a middle group of 61 “digital active” banks was little changed.“You could see in those three groups the performance deferential,” Alan McIntyre, an Accenture senior managing director and co-author of the report, said in an interview. “You see a gap, and where the gap is coming from, and it’s coming from digital.”Cost-CuttingThe $1 trillion estimate by Accenture is for retail and commercial banks globally, and includes all internal and external hardware, software, service and information-technology staff costs. The most digitally focused banks became more profitable through cost-cutting, Accenture researchers said, and Wall Street has rewarded them with higher valuations. While the study didn’t include names of the banks studied, McIntyre said that the 19 most digitally focused banks include JPMorgan Chase & Co.New York-based JPMorgan, the largest U.S. bank, has been a top spender among financial firms in the technology arms race. In February, it said it planned to boost its tech budget by $600 million to $11.4 billion this year.“Everyone is trying to do something -- there’s not any bank in the world that’s ignoring digital,” McIntyre said. “Everyone’s trying to become more digital, but it takes organization, evangelism, commitment and structure.”(Updates with co-author’s comment in last paragraph.)\--With assistance from Michelle F. Davis and Jenny Surane.To contact the reporter on this story: Elizabeth Rembert in New York at erembert@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, Daniel Taub, Steve DicksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Fed Interest Rate Cut on the Horizon: What it Means for Banks
    Zacks5 days ago

    Fed Interest Rate Cut on the Horizon: What it Means for Banks

    With the Fed opening the door for interest rate cut soon, banks will be at a disadvantageous position amid already challenging operating backdrop.

  • Central Banks Are Creating a Horde of Zombie Investors
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Central Banks Are Creating a Horde of Zombie Investors

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Ruchir Sharma, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley Investment Management, wrote a provocative op-ed in the New York Times last weekend. Titled “When Dead Companies Don’t Die,” it argues that unprecedented monetary stimulus from global central banks created a “fat and slow” world, dominated by large companies and plagued by a swarm of “zombie firms” — those that should be out of business but survive because of rock-bottom borrowing costs.I would add that central bankers are creating a horde of zombie investors as well.By now, bond markets have adjusted to the unabashedly dovish shift from European Central Bank President Mario Draghi and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell. In the U.S., benchmark 10-year Treasury yields fell below 2% for the first time since Donald Trump was elected president, and some Wall Street strategists expect it’ll reach a record low around this time in 2020. Across the Atlantic, 10-year German bund yields plumbed new lows of negative 0.33%, French 10-year yields hit zero for the first time, and the entire yield curve in Denmark was on the cusp of turning negative.With any sort of risk-free yield largely zapped worldwide on the prospect of further monetary easing, is it any surprise what happened next? Investors turned to the tried-and-true playbook of grabbing anything risky. No matter that the global recovery has lasted nearly a decade, trade concerns abound and central banks see economic weakness — the S&P 500 Index promptly rose to a record high as investors mindlessly plowed in. And in a more specific example highlighted by my Bloomberg Opinion colleagues Marcus Ashworth and Elisa Martinuzzi, bond buyers were all-too-eager to snap up subordinated Greek bank debt from Piraeus Bank SA, which tapped European capital markets for the first time since the financial crisis. “The offer would have been unthinkable a year ago,” they wrote.Are these really the characteristics of healthy financial markets? It hardly seems ideal that individual investors, pensions and insurers are effectively forced into owning lower-rated bonds, equities or even alternative assets like timber to meet their return targets. In fact, that sounds like the textbook definition of a bubble. But as Sharma points out, permanently easy policy aims to create an environment in which those bubbles can’t pop.“Government stimulus programs were conceived as a way to revive economies in recession, not to keep growth alive indefinitely. A world without recessions may sound like progress, but recessions can be like forest fires, purging the economy of dead brush so that new shoots can grow. Lately, the cycle of regeneration has been suspended, as governments douse the first flicker of a coming recession with buckets of easy money and new spending. Now experiments in permanent stimulus are sapping the process of creative destruction at the heart of any capitalist system and breeding oversize zombies faster than start-ups.To assume that central banks can hold the next recession at bay indefinitely represents a dangerous complacency.”Time and again, market watchers will warn that the credit cycle is on the verge of turning. “The future looks pretty bleak,” Bob Michele, JPMorgan Asset Management’s head of global fixed income, said this week as he advocated selling into high-yield rallies. “We have probably the riskiest credit market that we have ever had,” Scott Mather, chief investment officer of U.S. core strategies at Pacific Investment Management Co., said last month. Morningstar Inc. just suspended its rating on a fund owned by French bank Natixis SA because of concerns about the “liquidity and appropriateness” of some corporate bond holdings, adding to jitters about a broader liquidity mismatch in the money-management industry.It’s hard to take this fretting too seriously when central banks persistently come to the rescue. What’s more, in many ways it’s in the best interest of all involved not to get too worked up about those risks.U.S. households and nonprofits had a combined net worth of $109 trillion in the first quarter of 2019, a record, according to Fed data. Dig a bit deeper, and it’s clear that a surge in the value of their equity holdings plays a crucial role. They directly owned $17.5 trillion of stocks, which represents 110% of their disposable personal income. That ratio reached 120% in the third quarter of 2018, very nearly topping the all-time high of 121.2% set just before the dot-com crash. Add in “indirectly held” stocks, and individuals look as exposed to equities as ever. At $12.3 trillion, those holdings were worth 78.6% of DPI in the third quarter, compared with 69.5% at the dot-com peak.To put it more plainly, since the start of the economic recovery in mid-2009, their total assets have increased by almost 70%. Financial assets(1) have appreciated 76%. Stock holdings have soared by more than 140%.Effectively, the sharp rally in equities has turbocharged a resurgence in the overall wealth of Americans. The prospect of losing those gains is almost too painful to think about. Perhaps that’s why, as DoubleLine Capital’s Jeffrey Gundlach pointed out in January, investors were “panicking into stocks, not out of stocks” during the late-2018 sell-off. “People have been so programmed” to buy the dip, he said, that it reminded him a bit of how the financial crisis developed. Call investors programmed; call them zombies — it’s the same thing.The Fed, for its part, argues that it’s doing good by sustaining the expansion. Notably, Powell said the economic recovery is starting to reach segments of the U.S. population that had been largely left out thus far — communities that “haven’t had a bull market” and “haven’t had just a booming economy.” Overall, he said officials don’t see signals that the U.S. is at maximum employment. Morgan Stanley’s Sharma argues wage growth is sluggish because bigger companies have more power to suppress worker pay, given that they crowd out (or acquire) startups and other competition.There are no easy answers to these large-scale problems. That includes central banks simply lowering interest rates or purchasing more government bonds. Powell said as much, noting “we have the tools we have.” But at least he has some room to maneuver toward a soft landing. The ECB, which has pushed yields on some corporate bonds in the region below zero, and the Bank of Japan, which owns large swaths of local exchange-traded funds, have done virtually no tightening and may soon need to ease even further.The most troubling part of this heavy-handed approach among central banks is that it eliminates the option for investors to earn any sort of return above inflation on safe assets. This delicate balance seems as if it can only last as long as business and consumer sentiment allows. It has been more than a decade since the Fed last cut interest rates, and during that period, it paid handsomely to be a zombie investor throwing money at the S&P 500. With the next easing cycle upon us, much is riding on the status quo prevailing.(1) Aside from stocks, this includes deposits, direct-benefit promises, non-corporate businesses and other financial assets.To contact the author of this story: Brian Chappatta at bchappatta1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brian Chappatta is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering debt markets. He previously covered bonds for Bloomberg News. He is also a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Zacks6 days ago

    Slack Directly Hits The Markets

    Slack (WORK) is the most recent listing, hitting the exchanges today and immediately surging more than 50% from its reference price. Slack has taken a much different approach to make their share available to the general public.

  • GE’s Crown Jewel Shines, Confuses in Paris
    Bloomberg6 days ago

    GE’s Crown Jewel Shines, Confuses in Paris

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Aviation has long been considered General Electric Co.’s crown jewel, but with the company’s free cash flow turning negative this year, “crown jewel” is a relative term and the business is coming under increasing scrutiny. Some of it is deserved; some isn’t.GE Aviation CEO David Joyce seemed to be on a mission at this year’s Paris Air Show to prove his division’s worth. He arrived armed with more financial detail than GE had ever previously provided for the business, came out swinging against suggestions he was sacrificing price to score revenue wins, and announced some notable orders. And yet questions remain about what the business’s true financial profile would be if it was reconstituted as a stand-alone company and cut off from the tax and working-capital benefits that have historically come with being part of the mother ship. That matters, because many investors continue to value GE based on the sum of its parts, the argument being that the aviation unit alone can offset trouble spots in GE’s power, renewables and long-term care insurance operations and support a higher valuation for the stock.First, the positives: GE Aviation and its CFM International engine joint venture with Safran SA booked $55 billion in orders for engines and services at the Air Show, exceeding the $35 billion target Joyce laid out at a media briefing at the start of this week.(2) Like most order tallies from the event, not all of that is technically new business. The number includes an order from AirAsia that had initially been announced in 2016 and entails 200 of GE’s LEAP engines. The purchase was finalized at this year’s event and AirAsia also expanded a servicing agreement, bringing the total value of the deal to $23.1 billion before customary discounts. But there was also a significant new win: Indian budget carrier IndiGo agreed to a $20 billion order for Leap engines, spares and overhaul support.The deal is a blow to United Technologies Corp.’s Pratt & Whitney arm, which had been the sole provider of engines for IndiGo’s Airbus SE A320neo jets. As with Boeing Co.’s face-saving win of an order for its embattled 737 Max jet, some analysts have wondered what GE had to give up in order to convince IndiGo to abandon Pratt. They were encouraged in this thinking by comments from Pratt President Bob Leduc, who said “GE was willing to be more aggressive than we were” on pricing. That may just be Leduc talking his book, though.(4) Unlike in the depressed gas turbine market, where every revenue win likely comes at a cost to GE’s margins, GE shouldn’t need to sacrifice profit to chase market share in aviation – both in general and in the case of this particular deal. Pratt’s GTF engine has had a series of glitches that ultimately proved fixable and relatively minor, but as one of the largest buyers, IndiGo has borne the brunt of the fallout, including in-flight engine shutdowns and grounded planes. Earlier this year, India mandated weekly inspections of certain engine parts and restricted some operations for Airbus planes powered by the GTF. GE has engine headaches of its own. Boeing’s CFO Greg Smith put GE on the hot seat earlier this month, saying its GE9X engine was holding up the aerospace giant’s new 777X plane. At a media briefing this week, Joyce said GE discovered a part of the engine was showing more wear than anticipated and because of the extensive testing required to prove it had fixed the issue, the 777X’s first flight likely won’t happen until the fall. Investors are understandably jittery over any product setbacks after the uncovering of durability issues with GE’s flagship H-class gas turbine. But given the GTF’s history of bugs, I find it hard to fault GE for making tweaks to its engine. In the wake of the voluminous criticism directed at Boeing and the FAA for not realizing the potential impact of a software system linked to the Max’s two fatal crashes, rigorous testing – before the planes start flying – would seem to be in everyone’s best interest.GE has argued it has a technology advantage that will continue to give it an edge even as United Technologies increases its R&D budget through a blockbuster merger with defense contractor Raytheon Co. That remains to be seen, and I don’t think GE’s order wins at the Air Show tilt the scale one way or another. A smart R&D budget is worth more than a big one, but United Technologies will have a lot of money to work with and that will make it difficult for GE and others to stand pat. GE Aviation’s ability to respond to that competition ultimately boils down to how much cash flow it generates – and that’s where confusion continues to reign supreme. At Tuesday’s analyst event, Joyce laid out the various inputs behind the unit’s reported $4.2 billion in free cash flow last year. It was a sign the company is taking investors’ demands for more transparency seriously, although it remains disappointing that these disclosures come in fits and starts. There were some positive takeaways: Citigroup Inc. analyst Andrew Kaplowitz noted the improvement in inventory turns in 2018 even as GE ramped up production of the Leap. But one sticking point was the allocation of corporate costs including pension, interest and taxes, with JPMorgan Chase & Co. analyst Steve Tusa and Gordon Haskett’s John Inch debating whether the unit was carrying its fair share.On the subject of taxes, GE didn't do itself any favors as far as illuminating what's really happening in the aviation unit. The presentation included a line that indicated taxes and other operating expenses deducted $100 million from the aviation unit’s cash flow, which seems quite low on the face of it. But the aviation unit actually pays more than that in taxes. And GE isn't hiding that burden from its calculation of the free cash flow. You just have to know where to look for it.The starting point for GE’s explanation of how it calculated the aviation unit’s free cash flow – $5.8 billion in net earnings after adjusting for depreciation and amortization – had already been adjusted for taxes accrued, based on its operations, according to a company representative. GE confirmed the aviation unit pays a tax rate in the low 20% range that CFO Jamie Miller has guided to for the entire company. The $100 million number for taxes and other operating expenses in the Air Show presentation is something different. That is the difference between taxes paid and accruals in 2018. Are you still with me?The fact that this is all so confusing underscores one of the issues I’ve had with GE’s efforts to be more transparent. Disclosures come in fitfully and often leave people with only more questions. I don’t think GE always does this on purpose; it’s partly a reflection of the fact that this remains an incredibly complex company and any given number is going to require a half-hour explanation. But you can’t have it both ways. Is GE Aviation a crown jewel? Yes. Is GE very good at explaining that? It could use some work in that department. (1) The total doesn't include engines for the 200 737 Max jets that British Airways owner IAG SA ordered at the Air Show. CFM is the sole engine provider for that plane.The list price for those engines is $5.8 billion.(2) The flip side of Leduc's comments was Rolls-Royce Holdings Plc CEO Warren East's description of GE as a "very savvy commercial operator."To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Chase and Southwest Expand Business Card Portfolio with the Southwest Rapid® Rewards Performance Business Card
    Business Wire6 days ago

    Chase and Southwest Expand Business Card Portfolio with the Southwest Rapid® Rewards Performance Business Card

    Today, Chase and Southwest Airlines introduce the Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Card, a new credit card for business owners with an enhanced day-of-travel experience and accelerated earning in key business spending categories. The Southwest Rapid Rewards Performance Business Card has a new Cardmember offer of 80,000 points after qualifying spend. “Through research, we heard directly from business owners that they’re looking for simple and attainable perks out of their business credit cards, as well as more rewards for the business they do,” said Leslie Gillin, Chase Co-Branded Cards President.

  • ‘Levelheaded’ Powell Stays Calm despite Trump’s Rhetoric
    Market Realist6 days ago

    ‘Levelheaded’ Powell Stays Calm despite Trump’s Rhetoric

    After the June policy meeting, the Fed kept the interest rates changed. However, the Fed sounded amenable to future rate cuts. President Trump has been a fierce critic of Fed Chair Jerome Powell.

  • Treasury 10-Year Yield Slides Below 2% to Lead Global Decline
    Bloomberg6 days ago

    Treasury 10-Year Yield Slides Below 2% to Lead Global Decline

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