INTC - Intel Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
62.93
+1.23 (+1.99%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close61.70
Open61.90
Bid63.00 x 1100
Ask63.30 x 1200
Day's Range61.62 - 63.66
52 Week Range43.20 - 69.29
Volume33,395,738
Avg. Volume31,555,019
Market Cap266.446B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.82
PE Ratio (TTM)12.20
EPS (TTM)5.16
Earnings DateJul. 23, 2020 - Jul. 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.32 (2.14%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 06, 2020
1y Target Est62.62
  • Bloomberg

    Why Is Facebook for Remote Work? It Wants Pay Cuts

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- One constant in Facebook's corporate culture is the ruthless aggression when it comes to growth and competition. To take just one example: More than a decade ago, a young, upstart Facebook smashed a wage-fixing cartel that than had been imposed by older, more established tech companies and it tried to hire the best tech talent. With Facebook now among the most dominant employers in the San Francisco Bay Area labor market, the company is using its lessons from the past few months of work from home to hire remotely all across the country in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. In doing so, it's telling both its own employees and tech employers across the country that competition is coming. What remains to be seen is what effect this will have on wages both in and beyond the San Francisco area, where terms are ultimately set when it comes to the compensation of tech employees.The headlines in Facebook's announcement about working from home were twofold: First, that during the next five to 10 years, as many as half of Facebook's employees could be remote; and second, that the pay of remote workers will be tied to where they work. In other words, if you're moving from Palo Alto, California, to Boise, Idaho, expect a pay cut.Although controlling employee compensation costs is surely part of the thinking, current and would-be Facebook employees should recall that today's high compensation for Silicon Valley software engineers is partly because of Facebook's rule-breaking moves in the past. Until Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg left Google for Facebook, large technology companies such including Google, Apple, Intel and Intuit had what constituted a hiring cartel to prevent employee poaching, part of an effort to retain scare talent and hold down wages. Facebook, perhaps as an early indication of the disruptive nature of the next generation of technology companies, decided it would prioritize its own growth and talent acquisition. That undermined the cartel and led to rapid growth in both employee pay and home prices in the San Francisco Bay Area during the past decade.Facebook's decision on remote work is an extension of that mindset, one that doesn't abide by any niceties when it comes to attracting and retaining elite technology workers. Although the Facebook decision might be seen as little different from similar work-from-home announcements made by other Silicon Valley companies like Twitter and Square, it serves as a watershed moment in the same spirit as Amazon's public search for a second headquarters. Both decisions reflect the high cost and limited availability of technology talent on the West Coast, and that the need to hire outside the region persists, with different companies experimenting with different models on how best to do that.What's unclear is how this will shake out for workers. Although current and prospective Facebook employees are understandably concerned about the company saying that compensation will be tied to location, as long as technology talent remains much sought after, compensation should stay high. Housing costs outside of the West Coast may still be a fraction of what they are in San Francisco or Palo Alto, but technology talent is scarce and mobile throughout the country. It's unlikely that an employee that Facebook would pay $300,000 in San Francisco will be available for $100,000 in Salt Lake City, and if they are, that gap is unlikely to last for long as the word gets out and as other San Francisco Bay Area-based technology companies mimic Facebook's approach.Facebook's latest decision may well have a comparable impact to its decision not to join the hiring cartel, lifting pay everywhere outside the San Francisco area. Many tech employers in Tulsa, Oklahoma, or Kansas City know their best employees could always get recruited by West Coast tech companies if those workers were willing to relocate. But there are frictions involved in relocating, and maybe companies have been willing to bet that those workers aren't willing to move because of family and community ties. But if all of a sudden it's well-known that companies such as Facebook and Google are willing to hire anywhere without demanding relocation, then other companies will be forced to raise pay or risk losing talent -- the same quandary once faced by cartel members such as Intel and Intuit.Ultimately, the question is does being based in the San Francisco Bay Area function as a moat for technology employees, guarding their lofty pay, but one that is ready to be breached ? Or is high pay a function of high productivity, demand and industry growth? If it's the latter, tech workers shouldn't worry about Facebook's work-from-home decision. But it might well be the former.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Conor Sen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a portfolio manager for New River Investments in Atlanta and has been a contributor to the Atlantic and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here’s Why AMD Stock Has Doubled in the Past Year
    Motley Fool

    Here’s Why AMD Stock Has Doubled in the Past Year

    Prior to 2017, Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) was stuck. In the CPU market, AMD's products were vastly inferior to those of market leader Intel (NASDAQ: INTC). In the GPU market, NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) was overwhelmingly dominant.

  • Bloomberg

    TSMC Makes a Key Washington Hire To Help Navigate China Tensions

    (Bloomberg) -- Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., a major chipmaker to Apple Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co., has hired a new lobbyist in Washington to help stave off the impact of deteriorating U.S.-Chinese relations on its business.Former U.S. Chamber of Commerce executive Nicholas Montella joined the Taiwanese company in May as its director of government relations, just months after Intel Corp.’s former top lobbyist Peter Cleveland became TSMC’s vice president for global policy. The company confirmed the appointment of Montella, who previously focused on Japan, Korea and APEC policy, according to his LinkedIn profile.The world’s biggest contract chipmaker joins a growing number of companies, including Huawei, with business links to China that are increasing their lobbying activities in the U.S., looking to gauge and lessen the impact from Washington’s ongoing dispute with Beijing.The stakes for TSMC became even higher earlier this month when a new round of U.S. curbs thrust it into heart of tensions over Huawei. Under the rules from the U.S. Department of Commerce, TSMC will have to apply for waivers from Washington for future orders from Huawei. The Chinese tech giant is TSMC’s largest customer after Apple, according to Bloomberg supply chain data, contributing roughly 14% of the chipmaker’s revenue.The Commerce Department announcement came hours after TSMC said it would build a $12 billion plant for advanced 5-nanometer chips in Arizona, a desicion designed to allay U.S. national security concerns and shift more high-tech manufacturing to America.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • This Huge Opportunity Can Supercharge AMD’s Growth
    Motley Fool

    This Huge Opportunity Can Supercharge AMD’s Growth

    Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) is showing no signs of slowing down despite the adverse impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on businesses and economies around the globe. According to Mercury Research, AMD held 4.5% of the server processor market at the end of 2019. There are rumors that the chipmaker is aiming to attain 10% market share in server CPUs (central processing units) by the end of 2020 -- and seems to be making solid progress toward its goal.

  • Japan’s Hottest Stock Is Tiny Maker of $40 Million Machines
    Bloomberg

    Japan’s Hottest Stock Is Tiny Maker of $40 Million Machines

    (Bloomberg) -- The list of Intel Corp.’s annual supplier award winners tends to read like a who’s-who of the semiconductor industry’s biggest names. This year, it included a little-known Japanese company whose machines have become indispensable in the race to improve semiconductors and whose stock has been rocketing up as a result.Lasertec Corp. is the world’s only maker of testing machines required to verify chip designs for the nascent extreme ultraviolet lithography (or EUV) method of chipmaking. In 2017, Lasertec solved a key piece of the EUV puzzle when it created a machine that can inspect blank EUV masks for internal flaws. Last September, it cleared another milestone by unveiling equipment that can do the same for stencils with chip designs already printed on them. This March, Intel gave the tiny Yokohama-based company an award for innovation, its first after decades of doing business together.“That’s a major milestone for us,” Lasertec President Osamu Okabayashi said in an interview. “It means a lot to be recognized this way as a supplier.”The company’s stock has soared about 550% since the start of 2019, more than twice the gain of the second-best-performing security in the benchmark Topix index. Shares increased about 4% Tuesday, pushing its rise this year to more than 60%.Intel declined to say if it was buying EUV equipment from Lasertec, which already supplies test gear to its rivals Samsung Electronics Co. and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. The three chip fabricators are the only ones so far to announce EUV plans, because the technology is so complex and expensive. Okabayashi would only say that his company has “two or more” EUV customers.“This can be read as a sign that Lasertec’s tools are indispensable to Intel’s EUV roadmap.” said Damian Thong, an analyst at Macquarie Group Ltd.Read more: Japan’s Star Electronics Stock Will Be Vital to Intel, SamsungEUV is just entering the mass production phase after two decades in development, but investors are already betting Lasertec will be one of the key beneficiaries. The move to EUV overcomes key hurdles to shrinking manufacturing geometries of semiconductors, allowing more and smaller transistors to be crammed onto silicon. It promises to unleash another wave of gadgets that are slimmer, cheaper and more powerful.Last month, Lasertec raised its annual order forecast for the second time this year to 85 billion yen ($789 million) in the period ending June, nearly double the amount it received in fiscal 2019. The company is headed for the fourth straight year of record revenue and profits. Sales will climb 39% to 40 billion yen and profit will jump 76%, according to its estimates. And that’s likely to be just the beginning.Samsung earlier this month said it is building a 5-nanometer fabrication facility that will use EUV to make processors for applications ranging from 5G networking to high-performance computing from the second half of next year. Taiwan’s TSMC is pushing ahead with plans to adopt 3-nanometer lithography mass production in 2022 and announced plans to build an advanced fab in the U.S. Intel’s first product made using EUV is expected late next year.Their primary focus is on so-called logic processors, used to power devices and networking applications, but the new manufacturing technique will eventually filter through into the production of DRAM and other memory chips.Read more: Samsung Takes Another Step in $116 Billion Plan to Take on TSMC“Logic makers will be first to adopt EUV, with memory makers following later,” Okabayashi said. “The real volume of orders will come when they reach mass production stage. Right now it’s 7- and 5-nanometer chips. 3-nanometer is still in development stage.”Okabayashi expects each customer will probably need several of his testers, which could cost well over $40 million apiece and take as long as two years to build. A chipmaker would need at least one machine in its mask shop to make sure the stencils come out right. Another would go into a wafer fab to keep an eye on the microscopic wear and tear that result from concentrated light being projected repeatedly through the chip design stencils.“Lasertec is still trying to get a feel for this market and how big it can be,” Macquarie’s Thong said. “Their stock is moving on expectation of future orders. But there is little actual visibility on the scale of this market, so Lasertec retains a lot of capacity for surprise.”(Updates with share price in fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Where Will Advanced Micro Devices Be in 1 Year?
    Motley Fool

    Where Will Advanced Micro Devices Be in 1 Year?

    One of the biggest winners in the semiconductor space over the past few years has been Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD). The CPU and GPU designer had long been an also-ran in the chip space, with minimal market share relative to CPU leader Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) and GPU leader NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA). Look no further than AMD's stock price relative to the market for the last five years as evidence of its renaissance under CEO Lisa Su, who took over in 2014.

  • Is TSMC Becoming a Pawn in the Trade War Between the U.S. and China?
    Motley Fool

    Is TSMC Becoming a Pawn in the Trade War Between the U.S. and China?

    TSMC (NYSE: TSM), the world's largest contract chipmaker, recently announced plans to build a new $12 billion plant in Arizona by 2024. The announcement might seem like good news for Taiwan-based TSMC and Arizona, but it also indicates the company is becoming entangled in the escalating trade war. Let's see how this deal could affect TSMC's business, and whether or not it's becoming a pawn in the messy tech war between the U.S. and China.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Adobe, Advanced Micro Devices, Wynn Resorts and Everest Re Group
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Adobe, Advanced Micro Devices, Wynn Resorts and Everest Re Group

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Adobe, Advanced Micro Devices, Wynn Resorts and Everest Re Group

  • Nvidia Gives In-Line Forecast Helped by Data Center Demand
    Bloomberg

    Nvidia Gives In-Line Forecast Helped by Data Center Demand

    (Bloomberg) -- Nvidia Corp. gave a quarterly revenue forecast in line with analysts’ estimates, helped by a surge in spending on internet infrastructure and purchases of computer gaming gear.Revenue will be about $3.65 billion in the fiscal second quarter, the Santa Clara, California-based company said Thursday in a statement. That compares with an average analyst estimate of $3.28 billion. The company’s prediction includes a “low-teens percentage” contribution to revenue from its acquisition of Mellanox Technologies, which some analysts hadn’t included in their forecasts.Nvidia is the biggest maker of semiconductors that improve video-game play on computers. The company has parlayed that strength into a growing position in data centers, where its chips are well-suited to artificial intelligence work. Owners of data centers are buying more chips and other components to handle an increase in online activity spurred by a large chunk of the world’s population sheltering in place during the Covid-19 pandemic.Revenue from gaming was $1.34 billion in the quarter. That was a gain of 27% from a year earlier but a decline of 10% from the prior period. Data center sales leapt 80% from the same quarter in 2019 and were up 18% from the fourth quarter, making it the only market to post sequential growth for Nvidia.The company was hurt by supply constraints at the beginning of the quarter as Nvidia’s customers – personal computer and graphics card makers – had to close plants. Later in the quarter, shelter-in-place shuttered retail outlets -- which affected sales of gaming products -- Chief Financial Officer Collette Kress said in a statement published on the company’s website.Chief Executive Officer Jensen Huang recently unveiled new graphics chips and computers for AI processing in data centers. The products challenge Intel Corp.’s dominance in this area.Read more: Nvidia Unveils New Data Center Chips to Speed Pace of AIGross margin, or the percentage of sales remaining after deducting the cost of production, will be about 66% in the current quarter, Nvidia also said.The shares were little changed in extended trading following the report. Earlier, they closed at $351.01 in New York. The stock has surged 49% this year.Beyond gaming and AI, Huang is targeting the market for self-driving vehicles, which require similar chip capabilities. Still, the majority of sales come from PC gaming, where Nvidia’s graphics chips create the most realistic experiences.Profit in the fiscal first quarter was $917 million, or $1.47 a share, compared with $394 million, or 64 cents a year earlier. Revenue surged 39% to $3.08 billion and profit excluding certain costs was $1.80 a share in the period, which ended April 26, the company said. Analysts, on average, had predicted earnings of $1.69 a share on sales of $3 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.(Updates with divisional breakdown in fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Samsung Takes Another Step in $116 Billion Plan to Take on TSMC

    (Bloomberg) -- Samsung Electronics Co. has begun building a cutting-edge chip production line intended to help it take on Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. in the business of making silicon for external clients.South Korea’s largest company said it’s started construction on a 5-nanometer fabrication facility in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, dedicated to its made-to-order foundry business, an arena TSMC dominates. Based on the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography or EUV process, Samsung expects the fab’s output to go toward applications from 5G networking to high-performance computing from the second half of 2021, it said in a statement.Samsung, the world’s largest maker of computer memory, smartphones and displays, in 2019 outlined its aim of spending $116 billion to compete with TSMC and Intel Corp. in contract chipmaking, making silicon for customers like Qualcomm Inc. or Nvidia Corp. Its announcement on Thursday coincides with the announcement of restrictions on the sale of semiconductors made with American gear to China’s Huawei Technologies Co., a constraint that threatens more than a tenth of TSMC’s business.“This will enable us to break new ground while driving robust growth for Samsung’s foundry business,” ES Jung, head of the contract chipmaking division, said in a statement.Read more: Behind Samsung’s $116 Billion Bid for Chip SupremacySamsung first unveiled its expansion blueprint in April 2019, outlining at the time its goal of hiring thousands and ramping up investment in logic chips in the years leading up to 2030. That initiative arose as sales of smartphones and consumer electronics plateaued and competition from Chinese rivals depressed margins.EUV is the latest and most advanced chipmaking method, requiring machines costing tens of millions of dollars and delivering better precision and performance in the chips it produces. TSMC and Samsung, through its spending plan, are the leaders in developing that process and expanding into 5nm and smaller manufacturing nodes.Before the arrival Covid-19, Samsung had begun collaborating with major clients on designing and manufacturing custom chips and that work was already starting to add to its revenue, a Samsung executive has said. The company’s newest fab in Pyeongtaek joins another 5nm facility in Hwaseong that will begin production in the second half of this year.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • U.S. treasury holds first 20-yr bond auction since 1986
    Yahoo Finance Video

    U.S. treasury holds first 20-yr bond auction since 1986

    The U.S. Treasury is gearing up to auction a $3 trillion in debt to finance the growing federal budget deficit. Charles Schwab Chief Fixed Income Strategist Kathy Jones joins Yahoo Finance’s Seana Smith to discuss.

  • Microsoft’s Surface Book 3 is a powerhouse rival to Apple’s MacBook Pro
    Yahoo Finance

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 3 is a powerhouse rival to Apple’s MacBook Pro

    Microsoft's Surface Book 3 is a high-powered laptop-tablet hybrid designed for anyone in need of a monster laptop.

  • Dow Jones Surges 400 Points as Coca-Cola Warns on Pandemic Aftermath, Intel's AMD Killer Falls Short
    Motley Fool

    Dow Jones Surges 400 Points as Coca-Cola Warns on Pandemic Aftermath, Intel's AMD Killer Falls Short

    Strong earnings reports from retailers Target and Lowe's helped power the stock market higher on Wednesday morning. The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI) was up 1.8% at 11:30 a.m. EDT. Coca-Cola's CEO warned in an interview about weak sales volume in May and a painful recovery from the pandemic, and Intel's latest high-end gaming CPU was met with mixed reviews.

  • 5 AI Stocks to Put on Your Watch List Amid Coronavirus Pandemic
    Zacks

    5 AI Stocks to Put on Your Watch List Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

    The coronavirus crisis, which has disrupted many industries, may actually speed up the adoption of technologies like AI.

  • US STOCKS-S&P 500 flat after mixed retail earnings
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-S&P 500 flat after mixed retail earnings

    The S&P 500 was largely unchanged on Tuesday, after a strong rally in the prior session, as investors sifted through a mixed batch of results from major retailers including Walmart and Home Depot. Home improvement chain Home Depot fell 2.4% as it missed quarterly profit estimates due to higher costs, while department store operator Kohl's Corp slumped 7.8% after reporting a bigger-than-expected loss.

  • Intel's (INTC) New Chips to Boost Efficiency Amid Remote Work
    Zacks

    Intel's (INTC) New Chips to Boost Efficiency Amid Remote Work

    Intel's (INTC) new vPro processors offer business-class productivity and advanced performance to aid the modern workforce boost work-from-home capabilities.

  • Why Intel Could Lose More Ground to AMD
    Motley Fool

    Why Intel Could Lose More Ground to AMD

    Intel's (NASDAQ: INTC) fiscal 2020 first-quarter results were a tad disappointing as the chip giant withdrew its full-year guidance on account of the uncertainty caused by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Intel's guidance points toward a 12% increase in revenue and a 4% improvement in EPS, which pales in comparison to the prior quarter. This sharp drop-off means Intel may not be able to sustain its coronavirus-driven momentum.

  • Taiwan Semiconductor To Build a $12 Billion Chip Plant In Arizona
    Motley Fool

    Taiwan Semiconductor To Build a $12 Billion Chip Plant In Arizona

    The largest third-party chip foundry in the world is putting a cutting-edge facility on American soil for the first time in two decades.

  • Intel CEO: Expectations for the second quarter are relatively strong
    Yahoo Finance

    Intel CEO: Expectations for the second quarter are relatively strong

    Intel CEO Bob Swan shares his thoughts on the state of the global economy and what he has cooking at the tech giant.

  • Intel CEO aims to use technology to 'identify, treat and deal with future global pandemics'
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Intel CEO aims to use technology to 'identify, treat and deal with future global pandemics'

    Bob Swan, Intel CEO, joins Yahoo Finance's Alexis Christoforous and Brian Sozzi to discuss Intel's 2030 goals and strategies to continue progress in corporate responsibility, state of the semiconductor industry, investment in autonomous vehicles and more.