GPRO - GoPro, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
4.0300
-0.1300 (-3.12%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close4.1600
Open4.2300
Bid0.0000 x 3000
Ask0.0000 x 1400
Day's Range3.9800 - 4.2300
52 Week Range3.2500 - 7.6450
Volume7,282,930
Avg. Volume5,468,760
Market Cap608.083M
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.87
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.5490
Earnings DateFeb. 4, 2020 - Feb. 10, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est5.45
  • Qualcomm, GoPro, NVIDIA, Microsoft and Micro Devices highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Qualcomm, GoPro, NVIDIA, Microsoft and Micro Devices highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Qualcomm, GoPro, NVIDIA, Microsoft and Micro Devices highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Bear Of The Day: GoPro (GPRO)
    Zacks

    Bear Of The Day: GoPro (GPRO)

    Bear Of The Day: GoPro (GPRO)

  • GoPro (GPRO) Q3 Loss Narrower Than Expected, Revenues Fall
    Zacks

    GoPro (GPRO) Q3 Loss Narrower Than Expected, Revenues Fall

    Product launches, robust market share and channel inventory management drive GoPro's (GPRO) third-quarter financial performance.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of GPRO earnings conference call or presentation 7-Nov-19 10:00pm GMT

    Q3 2019 GoPro Inc Earnings Call

  • GoPro (GPRO) Reports Q3 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates
    Zacks

    GoPro (GPRO) Reports Q3 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

    GoPro (GPRO) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 12.50% and 4.68%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • GoPro quarterly revenue beats on 'Hero' camera demand, shares rise
    Reuters

    GoPro quarterly revenue beats on 'Hero' camera demand, shares rise

    "Both products (HERO8 Black and MAX) appear to be unquestionable hits with consumers and we're optimistic about their impact on our business going forward," Chief Executive Officer Nicholas Woodman said. The action-camera maker's revenue fell about 54% to $131.2 million (£102.36 million), beating estimates of $126.4 million, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

  • Investing.com

    Stockbeat: GoPro Surges on Takeover Bets

    Investing.com – GoPro was surging Friday as traders bet the company may be ripe for a takeover amid deal fever in the wearables space following Google's acquisition of Fitbit.

  • Earnings Preview: GoPro (GPRO) Q3 Earnings Expected to Decline
    Zacks

    Earnings Preview: GoPro (GPRO) Q3 Earnings Expected to Decline

    GoPro (GPRO) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Could GoPro, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:GPRO) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price?
    Simply Wall St.

    Could GoPro, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:GPRO) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price?

    If you want to know who really controls GoPro, Inc. (NASDAQ:GPRO), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share...

  • Implied Volatility Surging for GoPro (GPRO) Stock Options
    Zacks

    Implied Volatility Surging for GoPro (GPRO) Stock Options

    Investors need to pay close attention to GoPro (GPRO) stock based on the movements in the options market lately.

  • Two Gadget Makers Look to Move Manufacturing Out of China, Citing Trade War
    Bloomberg

    Two Gadget Makers Look to Move Manufacturing Out of China, Citing Trade War

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Two American consumer electronics companies said this week that they’re looking to shift manufacturing away from China and into other countries, citing pressures from import tariffs on their products amid the trade war.Fitbit Inc. said on Wednesday that it would stop Chinese manufacturing of its health trackers and smartwatches by January. Tile Inc. said it’s also considering plans to make its Bluetooth-enabled location trackers in other countries, after the company was hit with tariffs last month.“The biggest challenge for a company like Tile is our ability to plan for shifting changes in U.S. policy toward China,” said Chief Executive Officer CJ Prober. “With recent impacts, we are looking at other regions.”Tile on Tuesday added a new sticker to its lineup of tracking devices that help customers keep tabs on keys, wallets and the like, and raised $45 million in funding in its last round of funding earlier this year. The gadget maker does the majority of its manufacturing in China, but as the U.S.-China trade war has escalated, it’s now considering Mexico, Malaysia, Vietnam and “possibly the U.S.” as future manufacturing hubs, Prober said.“We are re-evaluating our entire supply chain and how we do what and where,” he said, adding that in recent weeks, Tile had dedicated an “entire team” to the task of traveling to different cities and evaluating manufacturing facilities. In a sign of concern from investors about the potential costs of relocating these operations, shares of San Francisco-based Fitbit fell as much as 2% Wednesday after announcing the move from China.Several U.S. companies, long accustomed to using China as a manufacturing base, are now looking to reduce their exposure to the country. Last year, GoPro Inc. announced it would move much of its U.S.-bound camera production out of China to avoid potential tariffs, and has largely accomplished that goal, according to a spokesman. In August, HP Inc.’s laptop maker Inventec Corp. said it will shift production of notebooks for the U.S. market away from China. Apple Inc. has been doing battle with the White House over requests to get the iPhone and other products off the list of Chinese-made goods slated to be hit with tariffs on Dec. 15.The latest $300 billion round of duties will impact essentially all remaining Chinese imports—with some exceptions, though details around which imports will be exempted are still unclear. Trade policy between the world’s two largest economies is still in flux. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is set to visit the U.S. this week for further trade talks.“We are supportive of the overall policy” of the U.S. in its negotiations with China, Tile’s Prober said. But “what’s been challenging is the implementation of that policy.” The company “only got a few weeks’ notice” that its products would be subject to new tariffs before they went into effect in September, he said. (Updates with Fitbit news in the second paragraph.)To contact the author of this story: Candy Cheng in San Francisco at ccheng86@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.net, Mark MilianFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Fitbit to Move Manufacturing of Smartwatch, Tracker Out of China
    Bloomberg

    Fitbit to Move Manufacturing of Smartwatch, Tracker Out of China

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Fitbit Inc. said it’s shifting manufacturing operations out of China for all of its health trackers and smartwatches to avoid U.S. tariffs on imports from the country.Starting in January, the company expects those products won’t be of Chinese origin and therefore not subject to import duties, Fitbit said in a statement Wednesday. Fitbit said it will give more details on the financial implications of the move during its third-quarter earnings conference call.Shares in San Francisco-based Fitbit fell 2% at 11:35 a.m. in New York, leaving them down 27% this year.Fitbit joins other U.S. companies moving out of China amid an ongoing trade war between the two countries. Tile Inc., which makes Bluetooth-enabled location trackers, also said it’s considering a similar move and is looking at Mexico, Malaysia, Vietnam and “possibly the U.S.” as future manufacturing hubs. Last year, GoPro Inc. announced it would move much of its U.S.-bound camera production out of China. And Apple Inc. has been battling the White House over requests to get the iPhone and other products off the list of Chinese-made goods slated to be hit with tariffs on Dec. 15.“This is a great example of companies making proactive decisions to mitigate tariff related-risk by, in this case, taking their entire supply chain out of China,” said Tom Forte, an analyst at D.A. Davidson. Others “may choose to follow suit as this trade war gets long and diffuse, and potentially escalates.” Davidson, who has a buy rating on Fitbit, said the stock market isn’t giving companies enough credit for their efforts to mitigate tariff-related risks. “I expect that as earnings season comes we’ll be hearing a lot more about this from companies.”Trade negotiators are heading to Washington for talks starting Thursday and China is open to reaching a partial trade deal with the U.S., an official with direct knowledge of the discussions said. The trade talks have failed to make serious headway since negotiations collapsed in early May.(Updates with shares in third paragraph; analyst quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Molly Schuetz in New York at mschuetz9@bloomberg.net;Kiley Roache in New York at kroache@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Robin AjelloFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Glancy Prongay & Murray LLP Announces Investigation on Behalf of GoPro, Inc. Investors

    Glancy Prongay & Murray LLP (“GPM”) announces an investigation on behalf of GoPro, Inc. (“GoPro” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ: GPRO) investors concerning the Company and its officers’ possible violations of federal securities laws. If you wish to learn more about this action, or if you have any questions concerning this announcement or your rights or interests with respect to these matters, please contact Lesley Portnoy, Esquire, at 310-201-9150, Toll-Free at 888-773-9224, or by email to shareholders@glancylaw.com, or visit our website at www.glancylaw.com. On October 2, 2019, GoPro reduced its full year 2019 revenue guidance to a range of $1.215 to $1.25 billion, citing a “late stage production delay” that shifted shipments of its new Hero8 Black from the third quarter to the fourth quarter of 2019.

  • Business Wire

    INVESTOR ALERT: Law Offices of Howard G. Smith Announces Investigation on Behalf of GoPro, Inc. Investors

    Law Offices of Howard G. Smith announces an investigation on behalf of GoPro, Inc. investors concerning the Company and its officers’ possible violations of federal securities laws.

  • Constellation weighed down by Canopy, Weak quarter at Bed Bath & Beyond, Uber launches marketplace for temps
    Yahoo Finance

    Constellation weighed down by Canopy, Weak quarter at Bed Bath & Beyond, Uber launches marketplace for temps

    Constellation Brands, Bed Bath and Beyond, Uber, Apple and GoPro are the companies to watch.

  • GoPro Stock Tanks 20% as Company Cuts 2019 Forecast
    Market Realist

    GoPro Stock Tanks 20% as Company Cuts 2019 Forecast

    GoPro (GPRO) stock is down 21.8% this morning. The action-camera manufacturer has reduced its 2019 revenue and EPS forecast.

  • GoPro cuts second-half outlook citing Hero8 shipment issues
    Reuters

    GoPro cuts second-half outlook citing Hero8 shipment issues

    GoPro is trying to differentiate its premium priced products from smartphones with advanced cameras, through its flagship HERO line and spherical camera Fusion, as it looks to lure back action junkies. On Tuesday, the company launched Hero8 Black, priced at $399 and a new dual lens GoPro MAX camera at $499 (405 pounds). It now expects to post an adjusted profit of between 33 cents and 39 cents per share for the second half of the year, compared with its prior forecast of 37 cents to 49 cents.

  • KLA, GoPro, Canadian Solar, SolarEdge Technologies and JinkoSolar highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    KLA, GoPro, Canadian Solar, SolarEdge Technologies and JinkoSolar highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    KLA, GoPro, Canadian Solar, SolarEdge Technologies and JinkoSolar highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Bear of the Day: GoPro (GPRO)
    Zacks

    Bear of the Day: GoPro (GPRO)

    Bear of the Day: GoPro (GPRO)

  • GoPro (GPRO) Looks Good: Stock Adds 7.4% in Session
    Zacks

    GoPro (GPRO) Looks Good: Stock Adds 7.4% in Session

    GoPro (GPRO) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 7% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • GoPro, Inc. (NASDAQ:GPRO): What Does Its Beta Value Mean For Your Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    GoPro, Inc. (NASDAQ:GPRO): What Does Its Beta Value Mean For Your Portfolio?

    Anyone researching GoPro, Inc. (NASDAQ:GPRO) might want to consider the historical volatility of the share price...

  • BlackBerry, Roku, GoPro, Shopify Down More than 5%
    Market Realist

    BlackBerry, Roku, GoPro, Shopify Down More than 5%

    It's been a bad day for small- and mid-cap tech stocks. BlackBerry, Roku, GoPro, and Shopify have lost significant market value today. Here's why.

  • The Trade War Spurs China’s Technology Innovators Into Overdrive
    Bloomberg

    The Trade War Spurs China’s Technology Innovators Into Overdrive

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.In Shenzhen’s glitzy financial district, a five-year-old outfit creates a 360-degree sports camera that goes on to win awards and draw comparisons to GoPro Inc. Elsewhere in the Pearl River Delta, a niche design house is competing with the world’s best headphone makers. And in the capital Beijing, a little-known startup becomes one of the biggest purveyors of smartwatches on the planet.Insta360, SIVGA and Huami join drone maker DJI Technology Co. among a wave of startups that are dismantling the decades-old image of China as a clone factory — and adding to Washington’s concerns about its fast-ascending international rival. Within the world’s No. 2 economy, Trump’s campaign to contain China’s rise is in fact spurring its burgeoning tech sector to accelerate design and invention.The threat they pose is one of unmatchable geography: by bringing design expertise and innovation to the place where devices are manufactured, these companies are able to develop products faster and more cheaply.“Ninety percent of the world’s headphones are produced in China, 90% of China’s headphones are produced in Guangdong, and 90% of Guangdong’s headphones are made in Dongguan,” explains SIVGA co-founder and product chief Zhou Jian, an 18-year audio industry veteran who has done work for global brands like Sennheiser Electronic GmbH & Co., Sony and Bose. His company is based in Dongguan because, he says, “Dongguan’s industrial chain is near perfect.” Zhou estimates there are hundreds of specialist factories in the area focusing on a particular component, such as screws, and his network of contacts among those suppliers has been invaluable. It was “support from these good friends” that got SIVGA, short for Sound Impression Via Genuine Artwork, off the ground.Now employing more than 30 people and offering a premium brand called Sendy Audio, SIVGA sells a luxury pair of $599 headphones called Aiva. Featuring handcrafted wooden ear cups and intricately detailed metal grilles, the Aiva have shipped more than 2,000 units into a niche, high-margin market that’s usually reserved for U.S. boutique outfits like Audeze and Campfire Audio. “As far as we know, we are the only company in Dongguan with a woodworking department,” Zhou says, while also pointing out that at SIVGA “the development time is short and many decisions can be made on the spot.” This instant design responsiveness is a signature feature of China’s new tech upstarts, and Zhou sums it up with an old Chinese proverb: “small boats change course easier than big boats.”DJI is the pioneer that proved Chinese tech companies could aspire to be more than just manufacturing contractors or fast copiers. “DJI leads the industry with features like automatically avoiding obstacles in flight, which it implemented first,” notes Techsponential lead analyst Avi Greengart. “Rivals in the U.S., France and Taiwan have not been able to catch up.” DJI’s lead is based on the same geographic synergies as SIVGA’s. When a U.S. rival suffers a manufacturing hitch or defect, its ability to identify and react to the problem is hampered by the distance between its designers and manufacturers. DJI doesn’t have that problem, which has helped propel it to being the top drone maker in the world.“These are Chinese companies that want to be industry leaders and innovators. DJI and Insta360 are perfect examples of that movement,” says Anshel Sag, mobile industry analyst for Moor Insights & Strategy. “A big part of it comes from the entrepreneurial spirit of Shenzhen.”Like Dongguan, which this year saw a large new Huawei Technologies Co. campus open, Shenzhen is a nexus of component makers and suppliers eager to find new customers for their wares. The cacophonous Huaqiangbei bazaar in the city exhibits a wild array of gadgets from smartphone-electric shaver hybrids to neon-lit unicycles with Bluetooth speakers. That commoditized fray offers inspiration but also an impetus to rise above it with genuine innovation. The successful companies are the ones who make the most of the rabid production and iteration around them.“In Shenzhen, there’s a well-established supply chain system,” says Insta360 founder Liu Jingkang. “From a research perspective, in-house R&D may only contribute 60% of a product, the rest needs to be finished in factories.” The CEO of OnePlus, another company based in the city, has expressed pride in its ability to prototype new devices at great speed because he’s just a 45-minute drive away from its assembly lines.Even without being Apple Inc., Chinese companies are now building world-class, premium products, though China’s signature feature of undercutting the established market remains. Whether or not a Chinese company is first to a technology, it makes sure to be first to a breakthrough price.Backed by Xiaomi Corp. in 2014, Huami is responsible for creating the massively popular Xiaomi Mi Band, which has flooded the China market at a $20 price. The Mi Band offers most of the features of a Fitbit fitness tracker — including step counting and heart-rate monitoring — at a fraction of the cost. After expanding to sales in the U.S. and launching its own Amazfit brand, Huami is now shipping in excess of 5 million devices per quarter, and its chief executive talks openly about “taking out” at least some of its larger rivals, including Apple and Samsung Electronics Co.“The operating models for Garmin and other European and U.S. smart device vendors are flawed. Their retail price is very high,” Huami CEO and founder Wang Huang says. “You will only be able to sell very expensive products to a very small group of customers because mainstream and lower-end markets will be eroded by companies like us.”Evidence for the Huami chief’s words abounds in the smartphone market, where the top group of manufacturers is increasingly dominated by Chinese names like Xiaomi, Oppo and Huawei. 2018 saw these brands make major inroads into the European market, relying on better pricing and faster feature introductions. Xiaomi “consistently produces budget flagship phones with first-to-market implementations,” says Techsponential’s Greengart. Along with SIVGA, Huami and Insta360, they’re following in the footsteps of companies like Lenovo Group Ltd., which was among China’s early breakout successes after buying IBM Corp.’s PC business in 2004. Their global ambitions and innovation pose a serious threat to the leadership of a plethora of U.S. tech products in areas from design to functionality, whether they be GoPro cameras, Apple iPhones or HP laptops.China’s rapidly rising tech creators are not without commercial savvy. Many of them are planning to seek capital on Shanghai’s new trading venue for startups, locally known as the Star board. Ninebot Inc., the Xiaomi-backed outfit that acquired Segway in 2015, aims to raise $300 million there. In unicorn territory, the Google-backed Mobvoi, which creates natural language translation algorithms for its Wear OS smartwatches, is also said to be seeking a high-value listing on the Star market.Royole, the startup that earned a measure of notoriety by beating Samsung to selling the world’s first foldable device in 2019, has managed to secure a deal with Louis Vuitton that will see the two companies putting flexible screens on handbags of the future. Like Huami initially leaning on the Xiaomi brand to build itself up, Royole stands a chance to be a luxury goods player with the help of a bigger company. The differences between California’s Silicon Valley startups, which have tended to do a better job of marketing and deal-making, and China’s new generation of homegrown businesses are gradually disappearing.How and Why the U.S. Says China Steals Technology: QuickTakeAmerican critics, such as President Donald Trump, commonly point to a track record of Chinese companies copying features from abroad, and one of their bits of evidence is the way Apple’s iPhone software and design seem to be habitually recreated by Huawei, Xiaomi and others. There’s not much that a Western company can do in such situations. When Segway filed a complaint against a number of Chinese brands for IP violations, it ended up conceding the fight and getting acquired by one of its defendants.The observable change now is that a new generation of innovative companies aren’t waiting for someone else to show them the blueprint. China’s rapid ascent in innovation goes beyond anecdotal evidence from startups like DJI and Huami, and the country’s corporations now rank among the world’s most prolific patent applicants.“The trend of China moving to high-end manufacturing, research and design is unstoppable,” said Jia Mo, a Shanghai-based analyst with consultancy Canalys.To contact the reporters on this story: Vlad Savov in Tokyo at vsavov5@bloomberg.net;Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.net;Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Vlad Savov, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Would GoPro (NASDAQ:GPRO) Might Be Better Off With Less Debt
    Simply Wall St.

    Would GoPro (NASDAQ:GPRO) Might Be Better Off With Less Debt

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...

  • GoPro (GPRO) Down 23.1% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?
    Zacks

    GoPro (GPRO) Down 23.1% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

    GoPro (GPRO) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.