EQNR - Equinor ASA

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
14.59
-0.38 (-2.54%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close14.97
Open14.55
Bid14.15 x 3100
Ask15.22 x 4000
Day's Range14.38 - 14.69
52 Week Range8.41 - 21.04
Volume3,800,191
Avg. Volume5,447,752
Market Cap48.13B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.78
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.17
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.08 (7.21%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 15, 2020
1y Target Est17.09
  • Exclusive: Coronavirus spreads in Brazil's oilfields, as 6 offshore operators register cases
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Coronavirus spreads in Brazil's oilfields, as 6 offshore operators register cases

    Norway's Equinor ASA <EQNR.OL>, Brazil's Dommo Energia SA <DMMO3.SA> and Anglo-French firm Perenco are among at least six oil producers that have registered coronavirus cases among employees or contractors at facilities off the coast of Brazil, according to industry and regulatory sources. Royal Dutch Shell PLC <RDSa.L> and Brazil's Enauta Participacoes SA <ENAT3.SA> have registered one case each.

  • America's Fossil Fuel or Europe's Bet on Low Carbon Future?
    Zacks

    America's Fossil Fuel or Europe's Bet on Low Carbon Future?

    The coronavirus pandemic has indelibly impacted the global energy sector. Although the demand for oil has noticeably dropped and prices have plunged, the pace of shift to renewable energy from fossil fuel is still uncertain.

  • Coronavirus widens climate rift between European and U.S. oil majors
    Reuters

    Coronavirus widens climate rift between European and U.S. oil majors

    Europe's top oil and gas companies have diverted a larger share of their cash to green energy projects since the coronavirus outbreak in a bet the global health crisis will leave a long-term dent in fossil fuel demand, according to a Reuters review of company statements and interviews with executives. The plans of companies like BP <BP.L>, Royal Dutch Shell <RDSa.L> and Total <TOTF.PA> are in step with the European Union's efforts to transition to a lower-carbon economy and away from a century-old reliance on oil, and reflect the region's widening rift with the United States where both the government and the top drillers are largely staying committed to oil and gas. Global oil majors have all cut capital spending sharply as worldwide stay-at-home orders triggered by the coronavirus outbreak slammed fuel demand and sent oil prices to record lows.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP, Equinor and Royal Dutch Shell
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP, Equinor and Royal Dutch Shell

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP, Equinor and Royal Dutch Shell

  • Reuters

    Equinor, SSE to decide on Dogger Bank wind farm investment by end-2020

    Equinor <EQNR.OL> and SSE Renewables <SSE.L>, expect to take the final investment decision on the first two phases of the Dogger Bank offshore project, the world's largest wind farm, by the end of this year, the two partners said on Wednesday. Equinor has made a commitment to continue investing in renewable energy to transform itself from an oil and gas producer to a "broad energy" company, while also cutting spending on oil and gas projects as demand has been hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. The 3.6-gigawatt (GW) wind farm off Britain's northeast coast will potentially provide electricity to more than 4.5 million UK homes, and help Britain to achieve its goals to cut carbon emissions, Equinor said on its website.

  • World’s Biggest Wealth Fund Faces Record $37 Billion Withdrawal
    Bloomberg

    World’s Biggest Wealth Fund Faces Record $37 Billion Withdrawal

    (Bloomberg) -- Norway plans to draw a record 382 billion kroner ($37 billion) from its wealth fund, forcing the world’s biggest sovereign investor to embark on an historic asset sale to generate cash.The unprecedented withdrawal, revealed in Norway’s revised budget for 2020, is more than four times the previous record set in 2016.The development exposes the scale of the economic damage done by the twin crises of Covid-19 and a collapse in global oil markets, with western Europe’s biggest crude exporter now facing its worst economic slump since World War II.For the first time, Norway’s government is set to withdraw considerably more than the $1 trillion fund generates in cash flow from dividends and interest payments. A Finance Ministry spokeswoman said the estimate for the fund’s cash flow this year is 249 billion kroner. That means asset sales could reach 133 billion kroner, or $13 billion. In the published budget, the Finance Ministry lists cash flow of 258 billion kroner, which includes income from Norway’s domestic wealth fund, the spokeswoman said.“It’s obviously an historic event,” SEB Chief Strategist Erica Dalsto said. “But we’re also in a crisis that lacks historical parallels. This illustrates the double-whammy that’s hit the Norwegian economy, with repercussions from both containment measures and the oil-price collapse.”Bond SalesThe fund is likely to focus on its bond portfolio to generate the cash the government needs, both in the form of outright sales and by retaining cash as some bonds mature. (It needs to replenish its holding of stocks after its equity portfolio fell below a required 70% target of the total portfolio.)Norway’s government uses its oil wealth to plug budget deficits every year. Until 2016, the so-called structural oil-corrected deficit was covered by the state’s income from petroleum, namely taxes, stakes in offshore fields and dividends from Equinor ASA.As long as the government was generating a surplus, it could deposit money into the fund. In 2016 and 2017, deposits were replaced by withdrawals, as petroleum revenue dwindled due to a slump in prices. But the fund was still able to cover that easily with its cash flow.In 2020, everything changed. The government now expects to spend a record 420 billion kroner of oil money on crisis packages to prop up its economy, with the collapse in petroleum revenue compounding the shock. The government predicts its net cash flow from petroleum activities will drop by 62% to 98 billion kroner, the lowest since 1999.‘Financial Muscles’Norway has a self-imposed fiscal rule stating it should use no more than 3% of the fund’s value each year to plug budget holes (which represents the long-term real-return expectation for the fund). But it’s allowed to stray from that limit to help the economy during downturns. At 4.2% this year, spending will exceed the cap for the first time since the financial crisis in 2009.Norway must eventually return to the 3% limit, but this year’s breach is entirely justified, said Finance Minister Jan Tore Sanner.“Even if it’s expensive, it’s necessary,” he told a news conference. “We are lucky in Norway. Where other countries need to borrow money -- maybe even before they’ve paid back following the financial crisis -- we have solid financial muscles.”(Updates with Finance Ministry comment on cash flow estimate from fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Shell Cuts Dividend, Will Other Big Oil Firms Follow Suit?
    Zacks

    Shell Cuts Dividend, Will Other Big Oil Firms Follow Suit?

    We have analyzed three major integrated companies - ExxonMobil (XOM), Chevron (CVX) and BP plc (BP) - to get a view on dividend cut.

  • Equinor ASA (EQNR) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Equinor ASA (EQNR) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    Today I am pleased to present Mr. Peter Hutton. With me on the line, we have Lars Christian Bacher, CFO; Fine. As normal, Lars Christian will introduce the results and presentation for 10 to 15 minutes, and then we will run a Q&A session, which instructions you have had in order to call for around 45 minutes.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: ExxonMobil, Chevron, Royal Dutch Shell, Equinor and ConocoPhillips
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: ExxonMobil, Chevron, Royal Dutch Shell, Equinor and ConocoPhillips

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: ExxonMobil, Chevron, Royal Dutch Shell, Equinor and ConocoPhillips

  • Equinor suspends 2020 output guidance amid global oil cutbacks
    Reuters

    Equinor suspends 2020 output guidance amid global oil cutbacks

    Equinor <EQNR.OL> has suspended its 2020 oil and gas output guidance amid government-imposed curtailments and a glut of supply, and could take further action to scale back activity this year, the Norwegian energy firm said on Thursday. With operations from the North Sea to Africa, the Americas and Asia, Equinor had expected 7% output growth this year before Norway, Brazil and others joined OPEC and its allies in ordering production cuts as the coronavirus pandemic roiled oil markets. The company would prioritise "value over volume" and after having already reduced activities, particularly in the U.S. onshore sector, it would consider further reductions, Equinor CEO Eldar Saetre told a news conference.

  • Equinor head of exploration Dodson to step down
    Reuters

    Equinor head of exploration Dodson to step down

    Equinor's <EQNR.OL> head of exploration, Tim Dodson, will step down at the end of May in a planned leadership change, the Norwegian oil and gas company said on Wednesday. Dodson, a British citizen who has been Equinor's head of exploration since 2011, will also leave the company's executive committee but will remain with the company as vice-president for strategy execution, it said in a statement. Equinor has made a number of large discoveries during Dodson's time as head of exploration.

  • Saudi Arabia Should Spend Like the Debtor It Is
    Bloomberg

    Saudi Arabia Should Spend Like the Debtor It Is

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- There’s a certain devil-may-care glamour about going on a shopping spree when you’re already living beyond your means. It’s probably not the best way to convince your creditors to keep putting up the cash, however. Saudi Arabia might want to reflect on that after its recent splurge on oil companies, cruise ships and soccer. In the past month, the kingdom’s sovereign wealth fund has bought or been linked to plans to buy an 8.2% stake in cruise operator Carnival Corp.; about 80% of Newcastle United Football Club; and holdings in Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Total SA, Eni SpA and Equinor ASA. Alarmingly, the most sensible item on that shopping list may well be the 13th-placed team in the English Premier League. Carnival shares, for instance, are already down by about a third since the kingdom’s Public Investment Fund completed its acquisition of stock in the business last month.A country as over-exposed to crude as Saudi Arabia shouldn’t be using its sovereign wealth fund to buy more oil, either. Equinor’s controlling shareholder, the state of Norway, last year instructed its pension fund to sell off investments in upstream oil and gas, so as to “make the government’s wealth less vulnerable to a permanent drop in oil prices.” Saudi Arabia is doing the opposite.Even the PIF’s more prudent attempts to diversify its exposures into businesses distant from oil demand haven’t panned out so well. A pre-listing investment of $3.5 billion in Uber Technologies Inc. is worth less than $2 billion now. Its 38% stake in South Korea’s Posco Engineering & Construction Co. has lost more than two-thirds of its value since it was bought in 2015. And the kingdom managed to sell out of Tesla Inc. before its extraordinary rally at the start of the year.As rich heirs have known since time immemorial, a string of failed business ventures doesn’t need to cramp your style as long as that endowment cash keeps flowing — but the problem for Saudi Arabia is that, as we’ve argued, those days are fast running out.As recently as 2014, years of outsize profits on crude had left the government sitting on net assets equivalent to 47% of gross domestic product. Since then, lower prices and incontinent spending have eroded Saudi Arabia’s nest egg with astonishing speed. Net debt will hit 19% of GDP this year, according to the International Monetary Fund, before rising to 27% next year, while coronavirus and oil-fight measures could push gross borrowing to 50% by 2022.That’s still modest by rich-country standards, but none is as leveraged as Saudi Arabia is to the price of a single commodity, as my colleague Liam Denning has written. Barring extraordinary cuts to its budget or a 2008-style oil price spike, the kingdom is likely to remain a net debtor for the foreseeable future. Lenders already appear to be taking notice. Thanks to the general virus-inspired market panic and the specific effects of the current oil-price war, five-year credit default swaps insuring against non-payment of Saudi Arabia’s debt are currently running at about 179 basis points. That puts the country in the company of India, Indonesia, and Russia in terms of perceived credit risks, and far worse than the likes of Spain, Portugal, Ireland and Iceland.Its sovereign bonds still have a weighted average coupon of 3.43% and maturity in the latter half of 2030, so for the moment things seem comfortable enough. But lower-for-longer oil prices could cause that outlook to unwind remarkably quickly, especially if the kingdom’s fast-shrinking foreign reserves start putting pressure on the riyal’s dollar peg.Despite the PIF’s shopping spree, there are signs that Riyadh is aware of how constrained its circumstances are starting to become. Last week's announcement of a ceasefire in the bloody five-year war in Yemen is welcome for humanitarian reasons — but it’s also necessary on a more pragmatic level. Saudi Arabia’s military spending is the third-biggest globally after the U.S. and China, and amounts to an extraordinary 8.8% of GDP — the highest share of any country for which the World Bank has recent data.The ceasefire is being attributed to the impact of Covid-19, but it’s hard not to notice that military spending this year will fall to its lowest level in a decade. When the finances get tight, you just don’t have the money to spend on a quagmire that you once did.That willingness to make cuts is welcome — but once you add the amounts dedicated to domestic security, some 28% of Saudi Arabia’s budget is still going on such expenditures. It’s not surprising that a government lacking popular legitimacy in the middle of a strife-torn region should be spending a lot of money on self-preservation. Still, a country where 40% of the 33 million-strong population is under 25 might want to invest more on health, education and other longer-term goals.It’s probably that 1 trillion riyal ($271 billion) government budget, rather than splashy overseas acquisitions, where the biggest savings need to be made right now. The message is the same, though: Riyadh needs to start cutting its coat according to its cloth, and fast.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Exxon's Spending Cut, Equinor's GoM Find & More
    Zacks

    Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Exxon's Spending Cut, Equinor's GoM Find & More

    ExxonMobil (XOM) pares 2020 capital spending budget by 30%, while Equinor (EQNR) announced an oil discovery in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

  • Oilprice.com

    Offshore Oil Could Soon Be Powered By Wind

    Norwegian oil major Equinor recently approved a wind project that may well transform the offshore oil industry forever

  • Investors Who Bought Equinor (OB:EQNR) Shares A Year Ago Are Now Down 31%
    Simply Wall St.

    Investors Who Bought Equinor (OB:EQNR) Shares A Year Ago Are Now Down 31%

    This month, we saw the Equinor ASA (OB:EQNR) up an impressive 37%. But that doesn't change the fact that the returns...

  • Equinor Gets Regulatory Nod for Floating Offshore Wind Farm
    Zacks

    Equinor Gets Regulatory Nod for Floating Offshore Wind Farm

    Equinor's (EQNR) Hywind Tampen wind farm project incorporates 11 floating offshore turbines, which are set to generate a total of 88 megawatts of electricity.

  • Equinor powers ahead with floating wind turbines despite oil crash
    Reuters

    Equinor powers ahead with floating wind turbines despite oil crash

    Norway approved on Wednesday Equinor's <EQNR.OL> 4.8 billion Norwegian crowns ($466 million) plan to build floating offshore wind turbines that will provide electricity to North Sea oil and gas platforms, the energy ministry said. The long-planned project is going ahead despite Equinor's decision to cut investment following a plunge in oil prices <LCOc1> that has reduced the company's cash flow. Five platforms at Norway's Snorre and Gullfaks fields will be the first in the world to receive power from a floating wind park, the oil company said in a separate statement.

  • Equinor (EQNR) Makes Oil Discovery in U.S. Gulf of Mexico
    Zacks

    Equinor (EQNR) Makes Oil Discovery in U.S. Gulf of Mexico

    Equinor (EQNR) encounters around 60 meters of net oil pay, which provides early indications of the productive reservoir in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

  • Oilprice.com

    Big Oil Raises Debt To Ride Out Price Crash

    As prices crashed, the supermajors resorted to one of the last tools they have before starting to potentially consider the painful idea of cutting dividends, taking on more debt

  • Reuters

    Norwegian gas exports to UK fall sharply as demand slumps

    Pipeline gas flows from Norway to Britain fell 44% on Friday from the start of the week as the summer gas season starts and coronavirus lockdowns continue to hit demand, data shows. Pipeline gas flows to Britain fell to 49.7 million cubic metres (mcm) per day on Friday, down from 88.6 mcm on Monday, according to data from Norway's gas system operator Gassco.

  • Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Operators Clamp Down on Capex to Combat Price Slump
    Zacks

    Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Operators Clamp Down on Capex to Combat Price Slump

    Driven by the ongoing trough in oil prices, Chevron (CVX), Equinor (EQNR) and Eni (E) made announcements on spending cuts.

  • Equinor's Sverdrup Field Elevates Plateau Production Target
    Zacks

    Equinor's Sverdrup Field Elevates Plateau Production Target

    Equinor's (EQNR) cheaper production value of less than $2 per barrel plus the breakeven price below $20 for full-field development of Johan Sverdrup makes it resilient against oil price volatility.

  • Is Change in Payout Strategy Need Of the Hour for Big Oil?
    Zacks

    Is Change in Payout Strategy Need Of the Hour for Big Oil?

    As the world fights a pandemic, top energy companies will have to reassess their payout strategies, either by slowing down share buybacks or reintroducing non-cash dividends.

  • Equinor says Sverdrup oilfield output to beat expectations
    Reuters

    Equinor says Sverdrup oilfield output to beat expectations

    Norway's Equinor <EQNR.OL> said on Monday its Johan Sverdrup oilfield is ramping up output at a faster pace and will produce more barrels per day than initially expected. Western Europe's biggest producing oilfield is now expected to hit a daily output rate of 470,000 barrels in early May, above the 440,000 bpd peak that had initially been pencilled in for mid-year, it said. "With low operating costs Johan Sverdrup provides revenue and cashflow to the companies and Norwegian society at large in a period affected by the coronavirus and a major drop in the oil price," Equinor executive Arne Sigve Nylund said in a statement.

  • Equinor to quit U.S. lobby group over climate policy
    Reuters

    Equinor to quit U.S. lobby group over climate policy

    Equinor <EQNR.OL> will leave industry the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA) lobby group over a disagreement on climate policy, the energy producer said on Friday. The Norwegian company is undertaking a review of its memberships of industry associations under an agreement with a group of institutional investors, the Climate Action 100+, signed last April. The Washington-headquartered IPAA represents thousands of independent oil and natural gas producers and service companies across the United States.