CNR.TO - Canadian National Railway Company

Toronto - Toronto Delayed Price. Currency in CAD
117.05
-0.21 (-0.18%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close117.26
Open117.20
Bid117.11 x N/A
Ask117.12 x N/A
Day's Range116.42 - 117.66
52 Week Range96.46 - 127.96
Volume1,392,027
Avg. Volume1,221,790
Market Cap83.726B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.93
PE Ratio (TTM)18.94
EPS (TTM)6.18
Earnings DateJan. 28, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.15 (1.84%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-06
1y Target Est119.89
  • Is Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR) a Buy at the Current Price?
    The Motley Fool

    Is Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR) a Buy at the Current Price?

    Is Canadian National Railway stock an attractive buy for value investors?

  • CN Rail (TSX:CNR) Is a Must-Buy After Strike Woes
    The Motley Fool

    CN Rail (TSX:CNR) Is a Must-Buy After Strike Woes

    Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) took another dip thanks in part to lingering effects of the recently ended Teamsters strike.

  • Baystreet

    Stocks in play: Canadian National Railways

    And Teck Resources Limited announced today a long-term rail agreement for shipping of steelmaking coal ...

  • GlobeNewswire

    Teck and CN Announce Significant Rail Shipping Agreement

    CN (CNR.TO) (CNI) and Teck Resources Limited (TSX: TECK.A and TECK.B, NYSE: TECK) announced today a long-term rail agreement for shipping of steelmaking coal from Teck’s four B.C. operations between Kamloops and Neptune Terminals, and other west coast ports. The agreement runs from April 2021 to December 2026, and will enable Teck to significantly increase shipment volumes through an expanded Neptune Terminals. The agreement also provides for investments by CN of more than $125 million to enhance rail infrastructure and support increased shipment volumes to Neptune.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Media Advisory: JJ Ruest, CN president and chief executive officer, to address 7th Annual Credit Suisse Industrials Conference on December 4

    MONTREAL, Dec. 03, 2019 -- JJ Ruest, president and chief executive officer, of CN (TSX: CNR) (NYSE: CNI), will address the 7th Annual Credit Suisse Industrials Conference in.

  • CN Rail strike to weigh on 2019 profit, shares fall
    Reuters

    CN Rail strike to weigh on 2019 profit, shares fall

    Shares in CN, which counts billionaire Bill Gates' investment firm as its biggest shareholder, fell almost 2% in morning trading in both New York and Toronto, after the company said it expects 2019 adjusted diluted per share growth in low to mid single-digit range. CN had previously forecast growth in the high single-digit range. CN, Canada's largest railroad, estimated the strike to slice around C$0.15 from its full year earnings per share.

  • CN cuts profit guidance due to strike, layoffs still planned despite backlog
    The Canadian Press

    CN cuts profit guidance due to strike, layoffs still planned despite backlog

    MONTREAL — Canadian National Railway Co. cut its profit forecast Tuesday in the wake of an eight-day strike by 3,200 workers that brought the railway to a near halt.CN now predicts 2019 adjusted diluted earnings per share will grow in the mid single-digit range, down from earlier guidance targeting the high single-digits.The strike reduced its earnings per share by about 15 cents, CN estimated."While we expect to take some time and we remain dependent on favourable weather, we are pleased by how things are progressing," said chief executive JJ Ruest in a statement.Despite the backlog of freight and containers, the company suggested it would go ahead with planned layoffs of roughly 1,600 employees as economic growth slows.The Montreal-based railway said it "remains focused on continuing to realign its resources in light of the weaker demand, including its workforce, to address cost takeout efforts that started prior to the strike."CN confirmed last month layoffs were coming and a source familiar with the matter cited about 1,600 impending job losses.Meanwhile, chief rival Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. moved more Canadian grain in November than in any month in its 138-year history.CP announced Monday it shipped 2.74 million tonnes of grain, three per cent more than its record-setting October load amid a hefty harvest that has put pressure on rail networks.CN reached a tentative agreement last week with Teamsters Canada to end the longest rail strike since 2012.Analyst Walter Spracklin of RBC Dominion Securities said the revised guidance "comes entirely as expected" after the labour stoppage.He stressed in a note to investors that "CN's resolve to realign all resources" — including workers — "remains intact."This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 3, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR, TSX:CP)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • GlobeNewswire

    CN Continues to Execute Recovery Plan

    CN (CNR.TO) (CNI) today announced that its recovery plan is on track and that it is revising its guidance following the impact of the 8-day strike. “Our discipline on our recovery plan is delivering results,” said JJ Ruest, president and chief executive officer of CN. CN would like to thank its customers for the collaboration they have provided during the recovery process and will continue to work closely with them.

  • Canadian National Railway Company (TSE:CNR)'s Could Be A Buy For Its Upcoming Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    Canadian National Railway Company (TSE:CNR)'s Could Be A Buy For Its Upcoming Dividend

    Readers hoping to buy Canadian National Railway Company (TSE:CNR) for its dividend will need to make their move...

  • Canadian Retirees: How the Rail Strike Impacts Your Income
    The Motley Fool

    Canadian Retirees: How the Rail Strike Impacts Your Income

    The eight-day Canadian National Railway Co (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) strike may soon have more substantial impacts on the retirement income of retirees in Canada.

  • The Canadian Press

    Most actively traded companies on the TSX

    Some of the most actively traded companies on the Toronto Stock Exchange Friday:Husky Energy Inc. (TSX:HSE). Energy. Down 37 cents, or 3.69 per cent, to $9.67 on 8.78 million shares.Zenabis Global Inc. (TSX:ZENA). Health care. Down three cents, or 12.24 per cent, to 21.5 cents on 6.62 million shares.Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Down 16 cents, or 4.6 per cent, to $3.32 on 6.62 million shares.Harte Gold Corp. (TSX:HRT). Materials. Up 5.5 cents, or 40.74 per cent, to 19 cents on 5.29 million shares.Encana Corp. (TSX:ECA). Energy. Down 13 cents, or 2.43 per cent, to $5.21 on 4.49 million shares.Manulife Financial Corp. Financial Services. Down three cents, or 11 per cent, to $26.13 on 4.46 million shares. Companies in the news:Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR). Down $1.64 or 1.34 per cent to $120.61. Canadian National Railway Co. says it is striving to address grain and propane backlogs as it ramps up service following an eight-day strike, but industry producers are demanding priority treatment that may not come. The railyway ground to a near halt after 3,200 conductors and yard workers picketed last week, operating at 10 per cent capacity and stopping corn and canola shipments. The company is deploying extra resources as it tries to unclog its crowded rail yards, but says extra product movement is not a guarantee.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 29, 2019.The Canadian Press

  • CN ramps up rail service as grain, propane industries demand priority
    The Canadian Press

    CN ramps up rail service as grain, propane industries demand priority

    MONTREAL — Canadian National Railway Co. says it is striving to address grain and propane backlogs as it ramps up service following an eight-day strike, but industry producers are demanding priority treatment that may not come.The country's largest railway ground to a near halt after 3,200 CN rail conductors and yard workers hit the picket lines last week, operating at 10 per cent capacity and stopping shipments of corn and canola, which sat in full silos that prevented further crop harvests for lack of storage space.The delay added to the woes of a late harvest that had already put pressure on the rail network as grain producers fretted over demurrage fees and contract extension penalties."We don't prioritize any commodities. When you're in recovery mode, you're focused on getting trains moving," said Sean Finn, CN's head of corporate affairs and chief legal officer.CN is deploying extra resources as it tries to unclog its crowded rail yards, but extra product movement is not a guarantee, he said. The railway aims to move about 5,000 grain hoppers this week, versus nearly 6,900 cars the week before the strike."CN has indicated that they will not be opening up the floodgates. They don’t want to overwhelm the system, and we recognize that that is a concern," Erin Gowriluk, head of the Grain Growers of Canada, said in a phone interview."But this is prime time for Canada’s grain sector, and the window is closing. Farmers need to get those crops into the bin, and what’s in the bin right now we need to get on track, literally, and off to port."Gowriluk described herself as "hopeful — I'm not sure I'm optimistic — but I think collectively we’re hopeful that the results will reflect their commitment, because the commitment, I think, is there."Farmers in Quebec faced the double crunch of stalled shipments and a propane shortage. The province began to ration the gas, which is used to dry crops as well as heat hospitals and nursing homes, the day after rail workers walked off the job on Nov. 19.The Canadian Propane Association is calling on the country's largest railway to give "priority support to replenish propane" in Ontario, Quebec the Maritimes. The industry group warned that unpredictable delivery could exacerbate the shortage at the onset of winter, when colder weather means shorter trains due to the effect on the air brake system.Two trains filled with 10 million litres of propane each have already arrived in eastern Ontario and Montreal, said Finn."We think the propane challenge that was attributed to us during the strike is being addressed. And hopefully we’ll be in a position where most propane orders in the course of the next week will be filled," he said.In Western Canada, a $130-million backlog of Prairie grain may lose much of its value if trains can't ship it to port before spring, when prices typically drop amid heightened global supply, said Western Grain Elevator Association executive director Wade Sobkowich."If you're not getting enough cars or as many cars as you need — which is what happens in the rail freight sector in the winter period — do you ever actually make that up?" Sobkowich asked.CN and Teamsters Canada reached a tentative deal Tuesday to renew a collective agreement, ending the longest rail strike since 2012 that halted shipments, triggered layoffs and disrupted industries across the country.The rail workers, who have been without a contract since July 23, said they were concerned about long hours, fatigue and what they consider dangerous working conditions, while CN argued that the strike revolved more around wages.Ratification of the settlement agreement is expected within eight weeks.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 29, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • Why the Strike Proved CN Rail (TSX:CNR) Stock Is a Defensive Buy
    The Motley Fool

    Why the Strike Proved CN Rail (TSX:CNR) Stock Is a Defensive Buy

    Though Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) dipped during the strike, its resilience makes for a strong long-term play.

  • Canadian National Railway hopes to be back on track by Christmas: senior official
    Reuters

    Canadian National Railway hopes to be back on track by Christmas: senior official

    Canadian National Railway Co hopes to recover from the effects of the country's biggest rail strike in a decade before Christmas, and would even look at bringing back recently cut crews and locomotives, a senior official said on Thursday. The eight-day strike by some 3,200 conductors and yard workers at Canada's largest railway delayed shipments of grain, propane and other goods. The stoppage over demands for improved working conditions and rest breaks ended on Tuesday as the company reached a tentative agreement with the Teamsters union.

  • GlobeNewswire

    CN Focused on Disciplined Recovery and Growth

    MONTREAL, Nov. 28, 2019 -- CN (TSX: CNR) (NYSE: CNI) today announced that it is implementing a recovery plan following the end of the 8-day long strike. “CN remains focused on.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Ghislain Houle, CN executive vice-president and chief financial officer, to address 7th Annual Credit Suisse Industrials Conference on December 4

    MONTREAL, Nov. 27, 2019 -- Ghislain Houle, executive vice-president and chief financial officer of CN (TSX: CNR) (NYSE: CNI), will address the 7th Annual Credit Suisse.

  • Canadian National Railway resume services after biggest rail strike in a decade ends
    Reuters

    Canadian National Railway resume services after biggest rail strike in a decade ends

    MONTREAL/OTTAWA (Reuters) - Operations resumed at Canada's largest railway, Canadian National Railway Co., on Wednesday, a day after company and union officials reached a tentative deal to end an eight-day-long strike that had triggered a severe propane shortage and left many Canadian exports stranded. A CN spokesman said on Wednesday that there were no hiccups in the return to work and that trains were resuming operations as expected. The company had said Tuesday operations would resume across Canada at 6 a.m. local time on Wednesday.

  • Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR): A Top Dividend Stock to Buy Next Year
    The Motley Fool

    Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR): A Top Dividend Stock to Buy Next Year

    Growing dividend is one of the top reasons to buy Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) stock next year.

  • Rio Tinto Declares Force Majeure on Canadian Aluminum Sales
    Bloomberg

    Rio Tinto Declares Force Majeure on Canadian Aluminum Sales

    (Bloomberg) -- Rio Tinto Group declared force majeure on its aluminum shipments from its Canadian operations as a result of backlogs created by a week-long rail strike.“The current situation constitutes an event of force majeure under the terms of the sales arrangements we have with you for aluminum sourced at our Canadian operations,” Rio Tinto said in a letter to customers seen by Bloomberg News. “Our ability to deliver under sales arrangements in accordance with volumes and schedules agreed to prior to the rail strike may be affected.”The week-long rail strike that began Nov. 19 at Canadian National Railway Co. halted shipments of metals, oil, grains and potash. Operations are expected to return to normal Wednesday after the union reached a tentative deal with the company.“Rio Tinto declared force majeure on contracts prior to Canadian National Railway confirming the strike was ending,” the company said in an email to Bloomberg News Tuesday. “We are working closely with customers to minimize any impacts as services resume.”The force majeure notice confirms the warning last week by supply-chain management and consulting company Mercury Resources that aluminum deliveries from Quebec into the U.S. will likely be delayed as the strike results in backlogs.Last week, the Union Pacific Corp., the largest freight rail provider in the U.S. West region, said it stopped accepting shipments into or from CN Railway’s Canada locations until CN operations return to normal.To contact the reporter on this story: Joe Deaux in New York at jdeaux@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Luzi Ann Javier at ljavier@bloomberg.net, Steven FrankFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • RRSP Investors: 2 Unlikely Dividend Stocks to Start a Retirement Portfolio
    The Motley Fool

    RRSP Investors: 2 Unlikely Dividend Stocks to Start a Retirement Portfolio

    Dividend stocks are popular picks for buy-and-hold investors who want to create a retirement fund.

  • 3 Big Trends, 3 Top Stocks: Here’s What to Buy This Week
    The Motley Fool

    3 Big Trends, 3 Top Stocks: Here’s What to Buy This Week

    Here’s how Suncor Energy Inc. (TSX:SU)(NYSE:SU) and two other top TSX stocks could help Canadians protect and grow their wealth.

  • CN, Teamsters reach tentative strike deal, economic fallout still top of mind
    The Canadian Press

    CN, Teamsters reach tentative strike deal, economic fallout still top of mind

    MONTREAL — An end to a nationwide rail strike that has gripped the country for eight days is within sight, but concerns linger over the economic fallout.Canadian National Railway Co. and Teamsters Canada reached a tentative deal Tuesday to renew a collective agreement for more than 3,000 workers, ending a strike that halted shipments, triggered layoffs and disrupted industries across the country.Normal operations at CN will resume Wednesday at 6 a.m. local time across Canada, the union said.Details of the settlement agreement, which must be ratified by union members, were not immediately available. Ratification is expected within eight weeks.CN chief executive JJ Ruest thanked the railway's customers for their patience. "I would also like to personally thank our employees who kept the railroad moving safely at a reduced capacity" — about 10 per cent — Ruest said in a statement.The union thanked the prime minister for respecting the workers' right to strike and acknowledged the help of federal mediators and the ministers of labour and transportation in reaching the deal."This government remained calm and focused on helping parties reach an agreement, and it worked," Teamsters Canada president Francois Laporte said.The federal government had faced mounting pressure to resolve the strike — either through swift mediation, binding arbitration or back-to-work legislation — as premiers and industry voiced concerns about lost profits and a critical propane shortage in Quebec.About 3,200 CN conductors, trainpersons and yard workers across the country, who have been without a contract since July 23, walked off the job on Nov. 19 over worries about long hours, fatigue and what they consider dangerous working conditions.Labour Minister Filomena Tassi and Transport Minister Marc Garneau congratulated the two sides for staying at the bargaining table and reaching a settlement."Had we taken an approach like the previous government in deciding to legislate back to work, we would not have had a solution today," Garneau told reporters in Ottawa.In 2012 federal legislation ended a nine-day strike at Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd.Tuesday's deal came a day after Nutrien Ltd. announced that it would temporarily shut down its largest potash mine, laying off 550 employees in southeastern Saskatchewan for two weeks starting Dec. 2 as a result of the strike. The fertilizer giant said Tuesday the layoffs will go ahead despite the deal."In terms of the backlog that was created with the supply chain due to the strike over the past week, it’ll take some time to recover," Nutrien spokesman Jeff Holzman said.The strike likely cost the Canadian economy about $1 billion, but part of the loss will be made up as excess shipments haul some of the built-up bulk over the next few weeks, TD senior economist Brian DePratto told The Canadian Press."The challenge with rail is that there’s only so much capacity," he noted.The Mining Association of Canada said the impact "will continue to be felt for the foreseeable future," as each day of disrupted service requires about a week to move the backlog."We're talking millions and millions of dollars of foregone economic opportunity here, lost sales," said Brendan Marshall, the association's head of economic and northern affairs. Winter weather could further slow shipments of surplus product, since cold temperatures mean shorter, slower trains.Marshall joined the Alberta Wheat and Barley Commissions in calling on Ottawa to treat rail freight as an "essential service" — which would bar it from strike action — due to its fundamental role in the Canadian economy."Canada’s longshoremen are already prevented from engaging in strikes that would impact the loading of grain vessels and the commissions believe those same provisions should be extended to rail," the commissions said in a statement.Premier Francois Legault compared rail transport to an essential service and called for a "mechanism" to avoid another propane shortage down the line. Longer-term solutions lie in "having less propane use and more hydro-electricity use," he added.Garneau dodged questions about potential compensation for certain sectors. On whether rail shipments should be an essential service, he said that "they are incredibly important for the economy.""It's normal that from time to time there will be interruptions when there is collective bargaining. That's part of life," Garneau told reporters Tuesday.About $300 million worth of Quebec crops still lie in the fields, at risk of being damaged or lost under a blanket of snow, said the provincial grain farmers union, whose president called on Ottawa for financial support. Harvesting operations — which rely on propane to dry grain — came to a standstill after trains carrying the gas to Quebec stopped moving.Returning propane supply to normal levels, particularly in the Maritimes, Quebec and Ontario — which depend on it to heat facilities ranging from hospitals to nursing homes and water treatment plants — could be weeks in the making, the Canadian Propane Association said.The Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan demanded Garneau ask CN for an immediate update on its winter shipping plans."We need to know how CN plans to make up the shipping shortfall," association president Todd Lewis said in a statement. "This is crunch time for our cash flow and producers need to move grain to get paid."Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe deemed the deal "absolutely a positive — not only for Saskatchewan and our export industries that rely on our rail service, our export transportation, but I think it's a sigh of relief for the entire nation."CN confirmed job cuts earlier this month just before the strike began due to sputtering commodities shipments and trade tensions between the U.S. and China.The railway cut its profit outlook for 2019 in October, saying a weaker economy had eroded rail demand. The Montreal-based company lowered its expectations for adjusted earnings per share to the high single digits, down from predictions of low double-digit growth.CN shares climbed on the news, closing up $1.58, or 1.31 per cent, at $122.49 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 26, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR, TSX:NTR, TSX:CP)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • Canada Rail Strike Ends as CN Rail, Union Get Tentative Deal
    Bloomberg

    Canada Rail Strike Ends as CN Rail, Union Get Tentative Deal

    (Bloomberg) -- A week-long rail strike that halted shipments of oil, grains and potash across Canada, threatening to take a multibillion-dollar bite out of the economy, is over.The Teamsters Canada Rail Conference union said it reached a tentative deal with Canadian National Railway Co. and normal operations will resume at 6 a.m. on Wednesday. About 3,200 conductors and railyard workers walked off the job Nov. 19 over issues such as working conditions and drug benefits.CN Rail shares rose 0.9% to C$121.97 in Toronto after losing 1.4% during the strike.The deal must now be ratified by Teamsters members via secret-ballot electronic voting, which CN Rail said in a statement it expected to take eight weeks. The union thanked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for respecting workers’ right to strike.“Previous governments routinely violated workers’ right to strike when it came to the rail industry,” Teamsters Canada President François Laporte, said in a statement Tuesday. “This government remained calm and focused on helping parties reach an agreement, and it worked.”Ships AwaitThe walkout was the first in a decade at Canada’s largest railway, one of the two main companies that haul cargo across the country, and had begun to take an increasing toll on the economy. Industry groups had been pleading with Trudeau to legislate an end to the strike but the government had pushed for a negotiated settlement.Montreal-based CN Rail carries about C$250 billion ($189 billion) worth of goods annually, including 180,000 barrels a day of oil in September, according to its earnings call.“CN is preparing to resume full rail operations as soon as possible,” said Jean-Jacques Ruest, chief executive officer of CN Rail, said in the statement. “I would also like to personally thank our employees who kept the railroad moving safely.”Amid the ripple effects, Nutrien Ltd., the world’s biggest fertilizer producer, had planned to temporarily close ts biggest potash mine starting Dec. 2, laying off 550 of 600 employees. Ships were waiting for grain off the West coast and the Montreal Port Authority reported cargoes of grain, sugar, minerals and bulk liquids were stalled on CN convoys. Farmers in Quebec and Ontario faced the prospect of letting their crops rot in the fields as the strike stalled shipments of propane used for drying.Strike ImpactThe nation’s gross domestic product was estimated to have lost as much as C$2.2 billion ($1.65 billion) if the deadlock lasted until Nov. 30, economists at Toronto-Dominion Bank predicted. If extended until Dec. 5, when lawmakers resume work in Ottawa, the conflict would have burnt a C$3.1 billion hole in the economy, the strategists forecast. That’s equivalent to a nearly one-quarter percentage point loss in the fourth quarter.Canada is the biggest exporter of canola, lentils, potash, field peas, flax and oats, according to government agencies, and much of it is hauled by rail from its vast inland Prairies to the coast.Canada has already been caught in the middle of China-U.S. trade tensions. China has shunned imports of canola following a diplomatic row over the arrest of a Huawei Technologies Co. executive on an extradition request from the U.S.(Updates with stock price in third paragraph, further details of impact.)\--With assistance from Ashley Robinson.To contact the reporter on this story: Sandrine Rastello in Montreal at srastello@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Scanlan at dscanlan@bloomberg.net, Jacqueline ThorpeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.