CNR.TO - Canadian National Railway Company

Toronto - Toronto Delayed Price. Currency in CAD
122.73
-1.03 (-0.83%)
As of 2:06PM EST. Market open.
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Previous Close123.76
Open123.00
Bid122.71 x N/A
Ask122.75 x N/A
Day's Range122.18 - 123.74
52 Week Range96.46 - 127.96
Volume476,863
Avg. Volume1,148,956
Market Cap87.789B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.93
PE Ratio (TTM)19.86
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.15 (1.73%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-06
1y Target EstN/A
  • CN facing 'significant' service disruptions as workers go on strike
    Yahoo Finance Canada

    CN facing 'significant' service disruptions as workers go on strike

    Canadian National Railways is facing “significant” service disruptions after about 3,000 conductors, trainpersons and yard workers walked off the job on Tuesday.

  • The Canadian Press

    Big industry raises alarm over strike as feds urge CN and union to keep talking

    MONTREAL — A growing number of industries are sounding the alarm over a strike by roughly 3,200 Canadian National Railway Co. workers, warning the work stoppage will dent revenues and could trigger layoffs and closures.The Teamsters Canada Rail Conference announced the strike Monday night after the two parties failed to reach a deal by the midnight deadline.Conductors, trainpersons and yard workers took to the picket lines Tuesday, halting freight trains across the country after CN confirmed last week it was cutting jobs as it deals with a weakening North American economy that has eroded demand.The work stoppage triggered worries among grain elevator operators and farmers about lost sales and contract penalties."When you lose a day of shipping you never recover it," said Wade Sobkowich, head of the Western Grain Elevator Association."There's really nothing that can be done. Once they're not moving trains, you're basically shut down without any alternatives until the issue is resolved."The oil industry expressed concerns over the closure of a key export artery, "particularly in light of the current shortage of available pipeline capacity relative to oil production in Western Canada," said Ben Brunnen, a vice-president at the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.The work stoppage will have a "seriously harmful effect" on other resource industries, said Mining Association of Canada chief executive Pierre Gratton."This strike will result in a severe reduction or elimination of railway capacity and will trigger the closure of mines with concurrent lay-offs of thousands of employees beginning in a matter of days," he said in a statement.Gratton called on the government to impose binding arbitration, adding that Ottawa should consider the step as a requirement in future labour disputes involving large railroads.The impact will depend largely on whether the strike drags out over a matter of weeks, said Veronique Proulx, head of the Manufacturers and Exporters of Quebec."The big manufacturers who trade from east to west are very affected," she said. "They have no other solutions to turn to. As we know, road transport is congested, so what are the alternatives?"We are talking about large volumes, so large amounts of money are involved," Proulx said.On Tuesday the federal government urged CN Rail and the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference to continue negotiating.Labour Minister Patty Hajdu said Tuesday the government is concerned about the impact of a work stoppage on Canadians, but remains hopeful the two sides will reach an agreement.CN Rail said it would return to the bargaining table Tuesday with the assistance of federal mediators. "We are disappointed that the TRCR has initiated strike action," spokesman Jonathan Abecassis said in an email.Union spokesman Christopher Monette said they hope to end the labour dispute as soon as possible.The union has said passenger rail services in the country's three biggest cities would not be affected by the strike.The railway workers, who have been without a contract since July 23, have said they're concerned about long hours, fatigue and what they consider dangerous working conditions.Janet Drysdale, CN's vice-president of financial planning, said at a Toronto investor conference Tuesday the layoffs were aimed at "aligning the overall labour expense to the reality of what we’re seeing on the demand side."Shipping volumes are down 11 per cent quarter to date, "which is significant," she said, adding that CN is not anticipating a recession next year "but more of a soft landing."Absent from the fireside chat was CN Rail chief executive Jean-Jacques Ruest, who was scheduled to speak. "We're very busy at headquarters these days," Drysdale said.CN services about half the elevators in Western Canada, said Wade Sobkowich of the grain elevator association, on top of exclusive access to the grain terminal on Vancouver's North Shore and the port in Prince Rupert, B.C.A delayed grain crop has already caused headaches for the industry following a dry spring and wet summer. Though the yield was big, some of it remains in the field, increasing pressure on the rail system.Meanwhile wet Prairie weather produced a crop with more mildew, sprout damage and frost. A worse product means lower prices, affecting all players along the supply chain, Sobkowich said.Canola exports have also slumped following China's ban on Canadian canola.The threat of a strike has already had an impact, as grain companies and foreign importers cut back on orders to avoid paying contract extension fees, demurrage charges "or, God forbid, defaulting on a contract," Sobkowich said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 19, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR)Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

  • Bloomberg

    CN Rail Strike Begins in Threat to Canadian Oil, Grain Cargo

    (Bloomberg) -- About 3,200 workers at Canadian National Railway Co. went on strike at midnight Tuesday, threatening to crimp shipments of oil, potash and grain across the country.Conductors and yard operators at Canada’s largest railway walked off the job after failing to reach an agreement with the company over issues including working conditions and drug benefits, the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference union said.“Unfortunately, we were unable to reach a deal with CN,” the union said in a statement. Workers have been without a contract since July and served a strike notice on Saturday.CN Rail is one of two main rail networks that Canada uses to ship consumer goods and exports of canola, wheat, potash and other resources from the prairies to seaports. The company carries C$250 billion ($189 billion) worth of goods annually and has increasingly been moving into shipping oil amid a bottleneck of pipelines from Alberta’s oil sands.Petroleum and chemicals account for 20% of CN Rail’s revenue, followed by grain and fertilizer with 16%. The strike involves only the company’s Canadian workers and doesn’t include the U.S., where CN Rail operates a rail line from Chicago to New Orleans.About half of Western Canada’s grain elevators are on a CN line, according to the Western Grain Elevator Association while the Mining Association of Canada said its industry is the single largest shipping group by volume on the country’s Class 1 railways. The railway shipped 180,000 barrels a day of oil in September, according to its earnings call.Autumn Harvest“There have been fairly heavy orders of late,” Bruce McFadden, director of research and analysis at grain monitor Quorum Corp., said in a phone interview. “It was a slow start to the season as the harvest was much delayed by weather. But even though it continued to be a difficult harvest there has been a substantial portion of the grain is available now.”CN Rail had been expected to supply 5,650 hopper cars per week for shipping of crops like canola and wheat to the Canada’s ports on the west coast though November, according to CN’s operating plan. In December grain shipping slows down with the weekly car allotment expected to fall to 4,150 cars until March.Canadian Labor Minister Patty Hajdu urged the parties to continue negotiations. “While we are concerned about the impact of a work stoppage on Canadians, we remain hopeful they will reach an agreement,” she said in a statement.Arbitration RejectedA representative for the Montreal-based company declined to comment on the strike. On Saturday, it said it continued to negotiate in good faith and had offered to go to binding arbitration, which the union rejected.Managers may step in to operate trains, blunting the impact of any walkout. Allison Landry, an analyst with Credit Suisse Group AG, said a walkout may crimp CN’s cargo volume, but the labor action probably wouldn’t last long and the impact on the company’s earnings wouldn’t be meaningful.“Historically, rail strikes have lasted a few days, and the Canadian government has been quick to step in and implement back-to-work legislation given the significant threat to the economy,” Landry said in a note to clients.Still, the government may have less leverage to push for a resolution over the next couple of weeks because parliament isn’t scheduled to convene until Dec. 5. That could delay the adoption of back-to-work legislation until then.The Teamsters argue that workers are being forced to operate trains alone from outside the locomotive while hanging on to moving trains with one hand and working a remote-control device in the other, creating a safety hazard. The union is also balking at a lifetime cap on prescription drug coverage and said the company is making it more difficult to take time off and work longer hours.Canadian National fell 1.1% to C$122.46 at 11:28 a.m. in Toronto. It’s gained about 22% this year, compared with the 24% gain of an index of Canadian industrial stocks.(Updates with potential impact on grains, oil, mining from 6th paragraph)\--With assistance from Theophilos Argitis.To contact the reporters on this story: Thomas Black in Dallas at tblack@bloomberg.net;Ashley Robinson in Winnipeg (Non BLP Loc) at arobinson193@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Case at bcase4@bloomberg.net, Jacqueline ThorpeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Canada's largest railroad hit by first strike in a decade
    Reuters

    Canada's largest railroad hit by first strike in a decade

    MONTREAL/WINNIPEG (Reuters) - Thousands of workers at Canada's largest railway went on strike for the first time in a decade on Tuesday, disrupting the shipping of commodities and piling pressure on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's minority Liberal government. About 3,000 unionized workers, including conductors and yardmen from Canadian National Railway hit picket lines, after both sides failed to resolve contract issues at a time of softening demand for freight service. Canada, one of the world's biggest exporters of farm products, relies on its two main railways, CN and Canadian Pacific Railway , to move canola, wheat and other commodities over vast distances from western farms to ports.

  • CN Rail Strike Begins, Threatening Canada Oil, Grain Shipments
    Bloomberg

    CN Rail Strike Begins, Threatening Canada Oil, Grain Shipments

    (Bloomberg) -- About 3,200 workers at Canadian National Railway Co. went on strike at midnight Tuesday, threatening to crimp shipments of oil, potash and grain across the country.Conductors and railyard operators at Canada’s largest railway walked off the job after failing to reach an agreement with the company over issues including working conditions and drug benefits, the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference union said.“Unfortunately, we were unable to reach a deal with CN,” the union said in a statement. Workers have been without a contract since July and served a strike notice on Saturday.CN Rail is one of two main rail networks that Canada uses to ship consumer goods and exports of canola, wheat, potash and other resources from the prairies to seaports. The company carries C$250 billion ($189 billion) worth of goods annually and has increasingly been moving into shipping oil amid a bottleneck of pipelines from Alberta’s oil sands.A representative for the Montreal-based company declined to immediately comment on the strike. On Saturday, it said it continued to negotiate in good faith and had offered to go to binding arbitration, which the union rejected.Managers may step in to operate trains, blunting the impact of any walkout. Allison Landry, an analyst with Credit Suisse Group AG, said a walkout may crimp CN’s cargo volume, the labor action likely wouldn’t last long and the impact on the company’s earnings wouldn’t be meaningful.“Historically, rail strikes have lasted a few days, and the Canadian government has been quick to step in and implement back-to-work legislation given the significant threat to the economy,” Landry said in a note to clients.Government MonitoringStill, the government may have less leverage to push for a resolution over the next couple of weeks because parliament isn’t scheduled to convene until Dec. 5. That could delay the adoption of back-to-work legislation until then.Canadian Labor Minister Patty Hajdu traveled to Montreal on Monday to meet representatives from both sides. In a Nov. 16 statement, Hajdu said the federal government is monitoring the situation closely and “has faith” in the collective bargaining process.The Teamsters argue that workers are being forced to operate trains alone from outside the locomotive while hanging on to moving trains with one hand and working a remote-control device in the other, creating a safety hazard. The union is also balking at a lifetime cap on prescription drug coverage and said the company is making it more difficult to take time off and work longer hours.Canadian National fell 0.2% to close at C$123.76 in Toronto on Monday. It has gained 22% this year.(Updates with workers going on strike.)\--With assistance from Theophilos Argitis.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Black in Dallas at tblack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Case at bcase4@bloomberg.net, Jacqueline Thorpe, Will DaviesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thousands of Canadian National Railway workers go on strike
    Reuters

    Thousands of Canadian National Railway workers go on strike

    "Conductors, trainperson and yard workers at Canadian National Railway are now officially on strike," the union said in a tweet http://bit.ly/2O10KW3. Canada, one of the world's biggest exporters of farm products, relies on its two main railways to move canola and wheat over the vast distances from western farms to ports. The union had issued a 72-hour strike action notice period to the company on Saturday after the talks reached a stalemate, setting the momentum for the first strike at Canadian National in a decade.

  • Midnight strike deadline looms for CN Rail as some 3,200 Teamsters ready to walk
    The Canadian Press

    Midnight strike deadline looms for CN Rail as some 3,200 Teamsters ready to walk

    MONTREAL — About 3,200 Canadian National Railway conductors, trainpersons and yard workers could go on strike just after midnight tonight in a job action that would affect freight services if a deal isn't reached with the company.Passenger rail services in the country's three biggest cities would not be affected, the union said.The Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, the union representing the employees, gave the required 72-hour strike notice on the weekend.The union said it hopes to reach an agreement before the deadline to address safety and scheduling issues, but workers are prepared to walk off the job if their expectations aren't met."Our problem is not with the people in general, but with CN," union spokesman Christopher Monette told reporters on Monday.The union represents workers at commuter rail services including Go Transit in Toronto, Exo in Montreal and the West Coast Express in Vancouver, where passengers would remain unaffected.Exo spokeswoman Catherine Maurice confirmed Monday there would "not be an impact from this potential strike," but added it was monitoring the situation closely.CN said it continues to negotiate in good faith and has offered binding arbitration to ensure train services aren't disrupted.Federal Labour Minister Patty Hajdu said the Federal mediation and conciliation service has been working with the two sides since June and the government is monitoring the situation."I am encouraged to see that both parties are still negotiating," Hajdu said in a statement.The workers, who have been without a contract since July 23, say they're concerned about long hours, fatigue and what they consider dangerous working conditions. They are also fighting against a lifetime cap on prescription drug coverage.The dispute comes as CN confirmed Friday that it was cutting jobs across the railway as it deals with a weakening North American economy that has eroded demand.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 18, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR)The Canadian Press

  • The Canadian Press

    Most actively traded companies on the TSX

    TORONTO — Some of the most active companies traded Monday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (17,025.11, down 3.36 points.)Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Down 59 cents, or 16.43 per cent, to $3.00 on 28.7 million shares.Encana Corp. (TSX:ECA). Energy. Down 26 cents, or 4.51 per cent, to $5.50 on 6.8 million shares.Aphria Inc. (TSX:APHA). Health care. Down 62 cents, or 10.97 per cent, to $5.03 on 6.7 million shares.The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings. (TSX:TGOD). Health care. Down five cents, or 7.14 per cent, to 65 cents on 5.6 million shares.OceanaGold Corp. (TSX:OGC). Materials. Up six cents, or 2.31 per cent, to $2.66 on 4.1 million shares.Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED). Health care. Down $1.51, or 7.44 per cent, to $18.78 on 4 million shares. Companies in the news:Canadian National Railway. (TSX:CNR). Down 18 cents to $123.76. About 3,200 Canadian National Railway conductors, trainpersons and yard workers could go on strike just after midnight tonight in a job action that would affect freight services if a deal isn't reached with the company. Passenger rail services in the country's three biggest cities would not be affected, the union said. The Teamsters Canadian Rail Conference, the union representing the employees, gave the required 72-hour strike notice on the weekend. The union said it hopes to reach an agreement before the deadline to address safety and scheduling issues, but workers are prepared to walk off the job if their expectations aren't met.Aimia Inc. (TSX:AIM). Up 30 cents or 8.3 per cent to $3.93. Aimia Inc. has reached a deal with a group of dissident shareholders to overhaul its board of directors, ending a drawn-out fight over control of the company. The agreement also includes a plan by the company to buy back up to $125 million worth of Aimia's shares by Dec. 30. The deal marks a partial surrender to the group led by Charles Frischer, who had sought to overthrow half of Aimia's eight-member board, and to Philip Mittleman, the company's largest shareholder who was locked in a court battle with Aimia. All of the company's directors excluding Mittleman and chief executive Jeremy Rabe have confirmed they will not stand for election to the board at the company's 2020 annual meeting, to be held before May.Western Forest Products Inc. (TSX:WEF). Down four cents or 3.1 per cent to $1.23. Western Forest Products Inc. says negotiations with the United Steelworkers union representing workers in a long-running coastal B.C. strike ended without resolution on the weekend. The company says no active negotiations are occurring and no future mediation dates have been scheduled after 14 hours of bargaining occurred on Saturday and Sunday supervised by two independent mediators. CEO Don Demens says the mediators informed the company talks were over after it presented a contract offer. The strike which began July 1 affects about 3,000 coastal forest workers employed in Western Forest Products' sawmills and timberlands operations.Barrick Gold Corp. (TSX:ABX). Up 42 cents or 1.9 per cent to $22.33. Shares in Barrick Gold Corp. rose on Monday after the company announced plans to sell its 50 per cent non-operating interest in an Australian gold mine for US$750 million in cash. The deal to sell its stake in Kalgoorlie Consolidated Gold Mines in Western Australia — which includes the country's largest open pit gold mine, The Super Pit, as well as underground and processing works — to Australian gold miner Saracen Mineral Holdings Ltd. was announced on Sunday. This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 18, 2019.The Canadian Press

  • CPP Board: These 3 Stocks Are Worthy of Canada’s National Pension Plan
    The Motley Fool

    CPP Board: These 3 Stocks Are Worthy of Canada’s National Pension Plan

    Air Canada (TSX:AC)(TSX:AC.B) is among the stocks the CPP board has deemed worthy of Canada's national pension plan.

  • Bill Gates Owns Huge Amounts of This TSX Stock: Should You Buy?
    The Motley Fool

    Bill Gates Owns Huge Amounts of This TSX Stock: Should You Buy?

    Canadian National Railway Company (TSX:CNR) is one of North America’s most efficient railroads and investors have become very wealthy over the years by owning this stock. Is this the best stock to buy and hold over the long-term?

  • TFSA Wealth: How a $6,000 Investment Can Turn Into $126,000
    The Motley Fool

    TFSA Wealth: How a $6,000 Investment Can Turn Into $126,000

    It's possible to build a substantial self-directed retirement portfolio. Here's how.

  • CN Rail confirms job cuts as weakening economy cuts into freight volumes
    The Canadian Press

    CN Rail confirms job cuts as weakening economy cuts into freight volumes

    MONTREAL — Canadian National Railway Co. is confirming job cuts as it deals with a weakening North American economy that has eroded demand for railroad transportation.The company said it is "adjusting its resources to demand" but wouldn't say how many people will be affected.It said some employees will be placed on furlough and there will be reductions in both management and union job numbers.In October, Canada's largest railroad operator cut its adjusted earnings per share outlook percentage for 2019 to the high single digits, down from predictions of low double-digit growth.Freight volumes came in below expectations in the third quarter and manufacturing has also fallen off, it said.The railroad also said it was affected by a slowdown in the British Columbia forestry sector, where high log prices and dwindling timber supply have prompted shutdowns or curtailments in more than two dozen mills, and due to the weather-delayed grain crop on the Prairies."As explained during CN's Q3 results, the company is adjusting its resources to demand," said spokesman Alexandre Boule in a statement."This includes the difficult decision of adjusting its workforce to demand levels by placing some employees on furlough and reducing both management and union job numbers due to a weakening of many sectors of the economy. These adjustments have already started to take place across the network." This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 15, 2019.Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR)The Canadian Press

  • Buy Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR): Canada’s Top Dividend-Growth Stock
    The Motley Fool

    Buy Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR): Canada’s Top Dividend-Growth Stock

    Canadian National Railway Company (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) is attractively valued and poised to soar.

  • Is Canadian National Railway Company's (TSE:CNR) High P/E Ratio A Problem For Investors?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Canadian National Railway Company's (TSE:CNR) High P/E Ratio A Problem For Investors?

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll look at Canadian...

  • CN Rail (TSX:CNR) vs. CP Rail (TSX:CP): Which Is the Better Rail Stock for 2020?
    The Motley Fool

    CN Rail (TSX:CNR) vs. CP Rail (TSX:CP): Which Is the Better Rail Stock for 2020?

    Should you buy Canadian National Railway Company (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) or its Canadian peer for 2020?

  • This Dividend Stock Could Double Your TFSA Dollars
    The Motley Fool

    This Dividend Stock Could Double Your TFSA Dollars

    Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) is a solid dividend-growth stock to buy for your TFSA. Here is why.

  • 3 Highly Defensive Stocks to Buy Before 2020
    The Motley Fool

    3 Highly Defensive Stocks to Buy Before 2020

    Here are three stocks that can help to protect your portfolio from the inevitable market drop.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of CNR.TO earnings conference call or presentation 22-Oct-19 8:30pm GMT

    Q3 2019 Canadian National Railway Co Earnings Call

  • TFSA Investors: 3 Stable Growth Stocks for 2020
    The Motley Fool

    TFSA Investors: 3 Stable Growth Stocks for 2020

    Tired of sluggish returns? This trio of stocks, including Saputo (TSX:SAP), could give your portfolio the boost of growth it needs.

  • Retire Rich: How Canadian Couples Can Turn a $20,000 TFSA Into $350,000
    The Motley Fool

    Retire Rich: How Canadian Couples Can Turn a $20,000 TFSA Into $350,000

    Canadian families are trying to figure out how they can retire in comfort.

  • There’s a Safer Way to Play Canadian Oil Than Oil Stocks
    The Motley Fool

    There’s a Safer Way to Play Canadian Oil Than Oil Stocks

    Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) offers energy investors another way to play Canadian oil, plus it pays a safe dividend.

  • 3 Boring, Defensive Long-Term Winners
    The Motley Fool

    3 Boring, Defensive Long-Term Winners

    Looking for boring? Try Canadian National Railway Company (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI), Canadian Pacific Railway Limited (TSX:CP)(NYSE:CP), and Enbridge Inc. (TSX:ENB)(NYSE:ENB).

  • Baystreet

    Stocks in play: Canadian National Railway

    Is sponsoring the transportation by rail of the last known Centurion tank in Canada to be on the front ...

  • Can CN Rail (TSX:CNR) Stock Double Your Money?
    The Motley Fool

    Can CN Rail (TSX:CNR) Stock Double Your Money?

    Buy and hold Canadian National Railway (TSX:CNR)(NYSE:CNI) stock for excellent long-term returns.