BA - The Bcing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
379.39
-5.05 (-1.31%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close384.44
Open384.11
Bid378.00 x 1300
Ask379.39 x 1300
Day's Range377.92 - 384.73
52 Week Range292.47 - 446.01
Volume6,853,019
Avg. Volume4,484,728
Market Cap213.487B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.27
PE Ratio (TTM)43.50
EPS (TTM)8.72
Earnings DateOct 22, 2019 - Oct 28, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield8.22 (2.14%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-08
1y Target Est411.14
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Ryanair cuts jobs, offers O'Leary a $111mln bonus
    Reuters Videos

    Ryanair cuts jobs, offers O'Leary a $111mln bonus

    Conflicting fortunes Thursday for Ryanair staff, and the Ryanair boss. Europe's largest budget airline says it plans to cut as many as 700 positions. Some could go at the Dublin headquarters. At least some will be compulsory redundancies. The move comes after the airline said it had a surplus of 500 pilots. It's a different story though for high-profile boss Michael O'Leary. On Thursday (September 19) Ryanair shareholders narrowly approved a bonus scheme that could see him pocket 100 million euros over five years. That's about 111 million dollars. To get the payout O'Leary has to either double profitability or double the share price within the period. One stumbling block to that in the near term: the airline's Boeing MAX jets are still stuck on the ground. The type has been out of operation for months following two fatal crashes at other airlines. Boeing hopes to get the all-clear for U.S. flights before the end of the year. But on Thursday O'Leary said it could be February or March before they're flying again in Europe.

  • Is the Boeing 737 MAX a safe aircraft?
    ABC News Videos

    Is the Boeing 737 MAX a safe aircraft?

    The head of the Federal Aviation Administration will test the 737 MAX software update in Seattle.

  • Flying Back From a Thomas Cook Holiday? Good Luck
    Bloomberg

    Flying Back From a Thomas Cook Holiday? Good Luck

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Off for a bit of late summer sunshine? I hope you didn’t book with Thomas Cook Group Plc. The struggling British tour operator is in last-minute discussions with lenders to try to stave off a collapse because of a funding shortfall of 200 million pounds ($250 million).A company failure would be disastrous for half a million holidaymakers. Bondholders would suffer heavy losses too if Thomas Cook agrees to swap its debt for equity, as has been proposed. Administration might be even worse as debt-owners could get nothing. It’s less of a drama for equity investors. They’ll probably be wiped out either way.  The shares fell as much as 28% on Friday to a fresh low of 3.2 pence before recovering slightly.Repatriating Thomas Cook’s customers would be a massive logistical operation. It would be embarrassing for the company and the U.K. government as about 150,000 of those affected would be Brits.Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc is one of the lenders demanding that Thomas Cook finds another 200 million pounds in backup financing facilities before they will take part in a proposed 900 million pound capital injection intended to safeguard the company’s future. That rescue deal is being led by China’s Fosun Tourism Group, Thomas Cook’s biggest shareholder.Unless a solution is found soon, we may be confronted by TV pictures of crying babies and angry pensioners, complaining about their struggles to get home from their late summer break. As such, the company will want to avoid a collapse at all costs. As well as its worried customers, Thomas Cook employs 21,000 people and has 560 U.K. shops. Its options are limited, though.Finding someone to fund the shortfall is one possibility. Yet Fosun, which has agreed to contribute half of that 900 million pounds of rescue funds in return for 75% ownership of Thomas Cook’s tour operator and 25% of its airline, might be reluctant to stump up more. Selling off assets is another potential way out for the British company, which can trace its history back to 1841. However, big disposals are unlikely given the agreement to transfer those stakes to Fosun.The best hope is persuading RBS and the other lenders to back down on their demands, enabling the financial rescue to go ahead. But that’s a long shot too. The banks have seen Thomas Cook’s funding requirement balloon this year as its trading weakened, and they want reassurance that it can make it through the less busy winter period.Fosun could conceivably pick up Thomas Cook’s tour operator on the cheap after a collapse. But the damage would be so great to the brand that there may not be much point by then. While another rival such as Germany’s Tui AG might cherry pick some assets, it would be one of the beneficiaries of Thomas Cook’s demise anyway.Tui has had its own problems after the grounding of its Boeing  737 Max fleet. But the company has its own hotel and cruise ship brands, leaving it in a stronger position than its troubled rival. With capacity coming out of the market in the event of the Thomas Cook’s collapse, it would be even better placed.  The same can’t be said for any customers left stranded if Thomas Cook can’t find the answer to its funding problems soon. To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Stock Market News For Sep 20, 2019
    Zacks

    Stock Market News For Sep 20, 2019

    Benchmarks mostly closed in the green on Thursday on upbeat U.S. housing market as well as gains in Microsoft.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Johnson & Johnson, Boeing, Broadcom, Anthem and Allstate
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Johnson & Johnson, Boeing, Broadcom, Anthem and Allstate

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Johnson & Johnson, Boeing, Broadcom, Anthem and Allstate

  • Boeing (BA) Wins $157M FMS Deal to Aid Saudi F-15 Program
    Zacks

    Boeing (BA) Wins $157M FMS Deal to Aid Saudi F-15 Program

    Boeing (BA) secures deal to provide the F-15SA Original Equipment Manufacturer Training Program to the Royal Saudi Air Force.

  • Could Boeing Benefit from Airbus’s ‘Back’ Pain?
    Market Realist

    Could Boeing Benefit from Airbus’s ‘Back’ Pain?

    Some airlines have been forced to keep the back seats empty on Airbus’s (EASDY) A320neos due to a problem similar to Boeing (BA) 737 Max 8’s

  • Aviation industry expects double-digit insurance premium hikes after 737 MAX grounding
    Reuters

    Aviation industry expects double-digit insurance premium hikes after 737 MAX grounding

    MONTREAL/NEW YORK (Reuters) - The aviation industry is bracing for double-digit insurance premium hikes for the first time in about 15 years, as insurers wrestle with higher costs from aircraft groundings, including the grounding of Boeing Co's 737 MAX jets following two fatal crashes, insurance executives said this week. Aviation industry premiums have been creeping up since 2017 as companies renew their contracts, in the aftermath of costly plane and helicopter groundings, executives said on the sidelines of a Montreal conference on aviation and products liability.

  • Need To Know: The Boeing Company (NYSE:BA) Insiders Have Been Selling Shares
    Simply Wall St.

    Need To Know: The Boeing Company (NYSE:BA) Insiders Have Been Selling Shares

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. The...

  • FAA waiting for more software details before 737 MAX can return to service
    Reuters

    FAA waiting for more software details before 737 MAX can return to service

    Boeing Co still has a series of steps to complete before the 737 MAX can return to service, including submitting a pre-production version of a software update, Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson said. Dickson met with Boeing executives in Renton, Washington on Thursday and tested revised software in a simulator. The FAA has been reviewing proposed software and training changes from Boeing Co for months and it remains uncertain when Boeing will conduct a certification test flight, a step needed before its best-selling plane can fly again.

  • Baystreet

    New Record High for TSX

    TSX concluded Thursday at an all-time high, as strength in resource stocks overrode weakness in health-care ...

  • Top Stock Reports for Johnson & Johnson, Boeing & Broadcom
    Zacks

    Top Stock Reports for Johnson & Johnson, Boeing & Broadcom

    Top Stock Reports for Johnson & Johnson, Boeing & Broadcom

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Wall Street Gives up Early Gains on Trade Fight Worries

    Investing.com - A strong opening stock rally Thursday faded in the afternoon in part because of worries about the upcoming U.S.-China trade talks.

  • Aviation watchdog may ask Boeing to set up 737 MAX simulators in India
    Reuters

    Aviation watchdog may ask Boeing to set up 737 MAX simulators in India

    India's aviation safety regulator may ask Boeing to set up simulators in India to train pilots on the 737 MAX planes once it clears the aircraft as safe for flying, a senior official with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters. The 737 MAX, the fastest-selling plane in Boeing's history, has been grounded the world over since March in the aftermath of two fatal crashes in five months that killed 346 people. India's Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) will also conduct an independent inspection of the grounded planes once they are cleared for flying by the U.S. regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  • Defense Stocks Set to Gain After Strike on Saudi Oil Facility
    Zacks

    Defense Stocks Set to Gain After Strike on Saudi Oil Facility

    The drone attacks on Saudi oilfields increase the need for Saudi Arabia to strengthen its air defense missile systems. This is good news for U.S. defense majors.

  • Boeing (BA) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Boeing (BA) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Boeing (BA) closed the most recent trading day at $386.41, moving +0.58% from the previous trading session.

  • 3 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy After Fed Cuts Interest Rates for Second Time
    Zacks

    3 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy After Fed Cuts Interest Rates for Second Time

    We searched, using our Zacks Stock Screener, for large-cap dividend stocks investors might want to buy after the U.S. Federal Reserve cut interest rates for the second time...

  • Boeing can rebuild trust after 737 Max debacle: JetBlue chairman
    Yahoo Finance

    Boeing can rebuild trust after 737 Max debacle: JetBlue chairman

    Boeing can repair its image, says JetBlue Chairman Joel Peterson.

  • Lone 737 MAX criss-crossed Canada for pilot checks during grounding
    Reuters

    Lone 737 MAX criss-crossed Canada for pilot checks during grounding

    MONTREAL/PARIS (Reuters) - While the world's Boeing 737 MAX fleet remains grounded after two fatal crashes, a solitary Air Canada plane has been spotted in the skies, shuttling between Quebec and Ontario. In a rare exemption, approved by Canadian aviation regulator Transport Canada, the 11 flights in August and September were partly to maintain the qualifications of senior training pilots, Air Canada told Reuters in response to a query about flight tracking data. A spokesman for Air Canada said the airline was not able to use similar 737s within its fleet "to maintain check pilot authority in alignment with (Canadian aviation regulations)".

  • Boeing Ups 20-Year Projection for Jet Demand in China by 5.2%
    Zacks

    Boeing Ups 20-Year Projection for Jet Demand in China by 5.2%

    Boeing (BA) continues to expect single-aisle jets to be the key demand driver for commercial jets in China, comprising 74% of the total projection.

  • The Trade Dogfight Trump Can Say He Won Fair and Square
    Bloomberg

    The Trade Dogfight Trump Can Say He Won Fair and Square

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Terms of Trade newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Economics on Twitter for more.If President Donald Trump imposes new tariffs on European goods next month, America’s transatlantic allies can’t say they they’ve been blindsided like they have with other trade policies launched from his White House.While some may bristle that the self-proclaimed “Tariff Man” is expanding his trade fight with the European Union, Trump would be acting on the right side of international law in a long-running case pitting Toulouse, France-based Airbus and Chicago-based Boeing. This time he’ll have the explicit authorization of the World Trade Organization, the referee of global commerce.That’s a key distinction from Trump’s tariffs on Chinese goods, or steel and aluminum imports, or the threat of tariffs on foreign cars and parts — instances when he acts based on his presidential authority. It’s also a break from the norm for a leader who has trashed the WTO as the “single worst trade deal ever made” and threatened to withdraw from the organization entirely.Here’s how the international trading system is supposed to work:If a country gets upset with another country’s trade practices, it can file a dispute at the WTO where a panel of experts offers a judgment. If the losing country doesn’t comply with that ruling, the WTO allows the winning country to retaliate. For most of his first term in office Trump has preferred to cut to the chase and levy tariffs that he says are exempt from WTO oversight because they’re necessary to protect America’s “public morals” and national security. But in the instance of Airbus, Trump and his predecessors have pursued and succeeded in a landmark case against the EU that’s been a decade-and-a-half in the making. Last year the WTO ruled that the EU hasn’t ended its illegal subsidies, which Boeing and the U.S. claim give Airbus an unfair advantage, and the WTO will soon green-light new U.S. tariffs on billions of dollars worth of European goods.But the other shoe has yet to drop. In a similar action that’s still winding through the Geneva-based WTO, the European Commission is readying its own tariffs on U.S. exports in retaliation for unfair subsidies given to Boeing. EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom summed up the situation on Monday by saying “both we and the U.S. have sinned” and the time has come to settle the dispute rather than resort to tit-for-tat tariffs.The multi-billion dollar question now: Will Trump see an opportunity to forge a comprehensive aerospace accord with the EU or kick off a transatlantic trade war of epic proportions instead?Charting the Trade WarGlobal trade in services slowed during the first quarter of 2019, according to a new World Trade Organization report, which describes a “broad loss in momentum” among sectors like technology and tourism.Today’s Must ReadsU.S.-Japan deal | Washington has plans to sign a trade accord with Japan in coming weeks, though Tokyo warned any deal must include pledges of no new tariffs auto exports. Plow ahead | Chinese trade officials are coming to the U.S. this week to prepare the agenda for a meeting of top negotiators in October, the Ministry of Commerce said. Chip shot | The U.S. government will need to agree to talks with Huawei as part of a future trade deal with China, a top executive at China’s largest tech company said. Landmark hearing | Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy has been on trial since he became Britain’s prime minister, and on Tuesday his lawyers will defend it in the U.K.’s highest court. Swiss miss | Switzerland’s economy is expected to expand less quickly than the government previously project, slowed by weaker demand from the world’s major economies.Economic AnalysisSpending less | Economic slowdowns, trade wars and the U.S. Huawei ban threaten tech spending. Further easing | The PBOC stepping up stimulus to buffer the Chinese economy from trade war.Coming UpSept. 18: Japan, Italy trade balance Sept. 19-20: U.S.-China talks in WashingtonLike Terms of Trade?Don’t keep it to yourself. Colleagues and friends can sign up here. We also publish Balance of Power, a daily briefing on the latest in global politics.For even more: Subscribe to Bloomberg All Access for full global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, The Bloomberg Open and The Bloomberg Close.How are we doing? We want to hear what you think about this newsletter. Let our trade tsar know.\--With assistance from Brendan Murray and Viktoria Dendrinou.To contact the author of this story: Bryce Baschuk in Geneva at bbaschuk2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sarah McGregor at smcgregor5@bloomberg.net, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • International panel to criticise U.S. FAA's Boeing 737 MAX approval process - WSJ
    Reuters

    International panel to criticise U.S. FAA's Boeing 737 MAX approval process - WSJ

    As part of the panel's findings, the task force will call out the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for what it says is a lack of clarity and transparency in the way the agency delegated authority to Boeing to evaluate certain flight-control features, the Journal reported on Monday. The panel is expected to call for greater data-sharing and transparency among different governments, WSJ reported, with the draft report recommending reviewing and updating FAA guidance and day-to-day certification procedures to ensure the agency's early involvement in new onboard systems. The multi-agency panel is called the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) and includes air-safety regulators from Canada, China, Indonesia, the United Arab Emirates, the European Union, Brazil and the United States.

  • FAA chief to meet with Boeing officials, test 737 MAX simulator
    Reuters

    FAA chief to meet with Boeing officials, test 737 MAX simulator

    New Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) chief Stephen Dickson plans to fly to Seattle this week to fly "newly configured" Boeing 737 MAX software in a simulator and will visit with Boeing officials, the agency said Monday. Boeing plans to revise the 737 MAX software to take input from both angle-of-attack sensors in the MCAS anti-stall system linked to two deadly crashes that led to a global grounding of the plane in March. The FAA confirmed that Dickson, who took over as administrator in mid-August, has no firm timeline for the grounded 737 MAX to resume flights or when Boeing will turn over final documentation.

  • How the 737 MAX Grounding Affects United Airlines Stock
    Market Realist

    How the 737 MAX Grounding Affects United Airlines Stock

    One of 2018’s top airlines, United Airlines stock has struggled to gain altitude in 2019. UAL has returned ~9% YTD, lagging the broader market.