AAPL - Apple Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
205.02
-0.64 (-0.31%)
As of 11:25AM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close205.66
Open205.79
Bid205.10 x 1400
Ask205.12 x 900
Day's Range204.63 - 206.50
52 Week Range142.00 - 233.47
Volume7,178,677
Avg. Volume26,804,075
Market Cap943.313B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.09
PE Ratio (TTM)17.25
EPS (TTM)11.89
Earnings DateJul 30, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield3.08 (1.50%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-05-10
1y Target Est211.18
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • iOS 13: Here are the new security and privacy features you might've missed
    TechCrunch23 hours ago

    iOS 13: Here are the new security and privacy features you might've missed

    In just a few weeks Apple's new iOS 13, the thirteenth major iteration of itspopular iPhone software, will be out — along with new iPhones and a new iPadversion, the aptly named iPadOS

  • Market Realist2 hours ago

    Trump Calls for Revisit of JEDI Contract amid Complaints

    On Thursday, in response to a question about the JEDI contract, President Trump said he'd been hearing complaints.

  • Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid
    Bloomberg2 hours ago

    Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid

    (Bloomberg) -- Netflix Inc.’s biggest earnings surprise in years sent the shares plummeting the day after results were released, leaving analysts and investors wondering why they were caught so off guard.When some companies know that their quarterly results are going to fall short of forecasts, they put out a pre-announcement or update their guidance. But not Netflix.Instead, the company dropped a bombshell with no warning: Its customer growth was roughly half what it projected, and Netflix actually lost U.S. subscribers during the period. That hasn’t happened since 2011, when the company made a disastrous attempt to split up its streaming and DVD-by-mail operations.The fallout on Thursday included the worst stock rout in three years, with the stock declining 10% to erase about $16 billion in market value. Shares in the company are extending declines as the stock fell 0.6% in pre-market trading Friday.“You would think Netflix would want to update guidance or give a pre-annoucement, as I’m sure they definitely knew about this for a while,” said Nick Licouris, an investment adviser at Gerber Kawasaki. “But they probably didn’t want to do it because they were going to take a hit at that time or during earnings -- especially since subscriber numbers are the No. 1 thing analysts look at -- and in earnings you can spin it better than a stand-alone announcement.”Not Necessary?Another reason not to issue a warning: The company met most of Wall Street’s financial estimates, such as sales and profit. It was only the subscriber numbers that really came up short.“Revenue was very close to guidance and profits were actually above, so I’d guess they didn’t think it was necessary to pre-announce a weak sub number when other financial metrics were fine,” said Andy Hargreaves, an analyst at KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.There’s also been a broader shift away from giving earnings warnings, said Huber Research Partners founder Craig Huber.“I have noticed companies in media and internet that I follow do not seem to pre-announce pending negative results with the same regularity as years ago,” he said.Netflix, based in Los Gatos, California, didn’t have an immediate comment.The streaming giant’s tight-lipped culture extends beyond earnings. Unlike traditional media companies, it’s very selective about the viewer information it provides. Third parties try to fill the gaps by providing their own data on Netflix’s audience, but that can prove to be unreliable.Third-Party ServicesThose kinds of data services failed to predict the latest shortfall, Wolfe Research analyst Marci Ryvicker said in a note.“For several days,” she said, “investors told us ‘such-and-such data service suggests domestic adds will come in line; while international might be somewhat soft.’ Wrong. I mean -- right in the sense that international was soft but totally wrong on the domestic subs part.”Netflix remains the dominant paid video streaming service, with its sights set on international expansion to counter slowing growth at home. But rising competition abroad -- such as a U.K. streaming venture announced Friday between ITV Plc and the BBC -- could challenge that growth as well.Netflix also delivers its earnings in an idiosyncratic way. Instead of doing a traditional Q&A conference call, the company releases an “earnings interview” on YouTube with a single analyst. It also issues its reports on its website, not through the paid services that many companies use to disseminate information.Though this week’s stock rout was especially severe, it’s common for Netflix’s earnings to spark a huge share move. The average change on the day after quarterly reports is almost 13%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Compare that with Apple Inc., where it’s 4.4%. Or Microsoft Corp., where it’s 4.1%.There’s another explanation for the huge swings in Netflix’s stock: overreaction. That was the message from Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings this week. It’s easy to “overinterpret” subscriber figures, he said.“Sometimes we are forecast high, sometimes we forecast low,” he said. “We’re just executing forward and trying to do the best forecast we can.”(Adds Friday share move in fourth paragraph, further commentary in 14th paragraph.)\--With assistance from Morwenna Coniam.To contact the reporters on this story: Kamaron Leach in New York at kleach6@bloomberg.net;Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Market Realist3 hours ago

    TSMC’s Earnings Give Semiconductor Investors Hope

    TSMC's second-quarter earnings beat analyst estimates and suggest that the worst could be over.

  • Amazon Is Quietly Becoming a Threat to Spotify and Apple Music
    Motley Fool4 hours ago

    Amazon Is Quietly Becoming a Threat to Spotify and Apple Music

    The e-commerce giant's streaming music subscriber count rose 70% annually over the past year.

  • FaceApp Might Have Your Picture. Facebook and Google Have a Lot More
    Bloomberg5 hours ago

    FaceApp Might Have Your Picture. Facebook and Google Have a Lot More

    (Bloomberg) -- Sure, I like privacy in the abstract. But I’m applying for an apartment in New York City, and I just sent out my only slightly redacted W-2, credit history and screenshots of my bank account to several people just because they said they’re real estate brokers.So I cannot judge the thousands of Americans who sent in a picture of themselves to a Russian-made smartphone application that they hadn’t heard of the day before. FaceApp is a viral app that allows people to create startlingly realistic images of themselves as seniors or as children. And this week, it incited a panic as reports emerged that people using the app were sending their images to a little-known Russian company for doctoring.The scandal is not surprising. Whether it’s a hip thing like FaceApp (literally all it does is age you)—or the age-old torture of applying for an urban apartment—it doesn’t take much to get any of us to hand over our data.I have no idea whether people should be wary of FaceApp in particular. Security researchers have found no evidence that it sucks up all your photos or does anything similarly nefarious. The company said it deletes most images within 48 hours and that it will remove user data upon request.The fact that it’s Russian isn’t enough to discredit it. But Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has called for an FBI investigation. And if we were living in a movie, the all-powerful facial recognition machine that brings humanity to its knees would certainly be built on the back of viral human vanity.It’s interesting to look at the FaceApp panic in the context of the broader privacy conversation around Silicon Valley’s tech giants. At Facebook Inc., the company has argued that its size is part of the reason it’s able to safeguard user data better than smaller, less controllable competitors. And compared to any random app, I’m sure Facebook is fairly responsible. (Listen to this podcast for a compelling argument that the whole Cambridge Analytica scandal might have been kind of overblown.)Facebook’s opponents argue that by breaking it up, its various pieces and their competitors would be forced to compete by offering superior privacy protections. But with so many people so willing to trade their data for convenience (or a discount, or an apartment, or a face filter), the invisible hand of the market probably won’t protect us from tech overreach.The most obvious answer is privacy regulation. This is why we elect leaders to create a regulatory state to watch out for us. I’m not particularly interested in investigating the factory farm that pumps out the eggs that I buy. That’s why I rely on the Food and Drug Administration to keep an eye on things.But in the absence of strong government oversight in the internet world, we’ve had to rely on app stores and other log-in tools to protect us. That has some mixed results. And it means the gatekeepers—Apple Inc., Google and Facebook, in particular—know a ton about us.I’m sure some privacy-minded people will object to this sort of defeatism. Yes, people can take some responsibility for their privacy. As in, maybe do some background googling before downloading an app from a company that you’ve never heard of? But more likely, people will just embrace the post-privacy dystopia. If regulators won’t police the most obvious targets, Apple, Google and Facebook (which has even called for regulations!), I guess the Russians can enjoy looking at our smiling, naïve faces.This article also ran in Bloomberg Technology’s Fully Charged newsletter. Sign up here.And here’s what you need to know in global technology newsWeWork's CEO reaps cash riches without IPO. Adam Neumann has sold $700 million through sales and loans, the Wall Street Journal reports.Trade wars aren't all bad. The markets seem to think that South Korean chipmakers stand to benefit.Grindr struggles under new management. The president of the gay dating app once said "holy matrimony" should be between a man and a woman. BuzzFeed dug into the company's challenges.Worried about making enough money? Getting that dream job? Take a moment to try the Bloomberg Work Wise career calculator and learn how your salary stacks up, and how much your dream job might pay.To contact the author of this story: Eric Newcomer in New York at enewcomer@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bull of the Day: Amazon (AMZN)
    Zacks5 hours ago

    Bull of the Day: Amazon (AMZN)

    Bull of the Day: Amazon (AMZN)

  • Why It's a Good Idea for Apple to Start Paying for Original Podcasts
    Motley Fool16 hours ago

    Why It's a Good Idea for Apple to Start Paying for Original Podcasts

    It may buy exclusive rights for some podcasts to take on rival Spotify.

  • Can iHeartMedia Rise Out Of The Chapter 11 Ashes?
    Zacks19 hours ago

    Can iHeartMedia Rise Out Of The Chapter 11 Ashes?

    iHeartMedia (IHRT), the 1 audio media company in the US, has emerged from bankruptcy and its ownership is now available to the public on the NASDAQ exchange. The debt owners have taken over the firm in a restructuring plan that wiped more than $10 billion in debt off the books.

  • Netflix Suffers Worst Rout Since 2016 on Drop in U.S. Users
    Bloomberg19 hours ago

    Netflix Suffers Worst Rout Since 2016 on Drop in U.S. Users

    (Bloomberg) -- Netflix Inc. shocked investors by reporting a drop in U.S. customers and much slower growth overseas, raising fears that the streaming giant is losing momentum just as competitors prepare to pounce.The shares plunged 10% to $325.21 at the close in New York, the worst one-day drop in three years, after the company reported a loss of 130,000 customers in the U.S. Netflix blamed higher prices and a weak slate of TV shows. It signed up 2.8 million subscribers internationally in the period, roughly half what the company predicted.“Netflix has a difficult road ahead, with looming competition and the removal of popular content,” said EMarketer Inc. analyst Eric Haggstrom. But a stronger lineup of new shows in the current quarter could help attract former subscribers, he said.The quarter represents the biggest black eye for Netflix since 2011, when the company split its DVD-by-mail business from its streaming business. That move raised prices for its customers, and resulted in the loss of more than 800,000 subscribers in the U.S. The company had planned to call the DVD service Qwikster, but it backpedaled on the plan after investors and customers scoffed at the idea.Netflix said the miss is a one-time blip rather than a long-term problem. The second quarter has typically been its weakest time of year: The company missed its forecast during the period in three of the past four years.Netflix looks to add 7 million subscribers in the current quarter, thanks in part to the return of top shows “Stranger Things” and “Orange Is the New Black.”“Our position is excellent,” Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings said during a videoconference call Wednesday. “We’re building amazing capacity for content. Our product has never been in better shape.”Several analysts agreed that the second-quarter disappointment should be only a temporary hiccup for Netflix. Investors should “aggressively buy the stock” on weakness, especially below $325 a share, Loop Capital said.Heavy SpendingFor now, the second-quarter shortfall is renewing investor concern about the company’s heavy program spending and low profitability. Netflix shelled out more than $3 billion on programming in the quarter and another $600 million to market its shows. The company spent $594 million more than it took in and will need to raise money to fund programming.Investors had been forgiving about the spending and the debt -- so long as customers grew at record rates. But the loss of subscribers in the U.S. was the first since the Qwikster debacle, and it suggests Netflix may be running into price resistance or the limits of the addressable domestic market. The company has forecast it can reach as much as 90 million customers in the U.S., compared with 60.1 million currently.Overseas SlowdownInternational results flagged too, with the company missing its own forecast of 4.7 million new subscribers. Europe, Latin America and Asia have been the primary drivers of Netflix’s customer acquisition in recent years, and growth must be sustained if the company is to justify its high valuation.Netflix is introducing a cheaper, mobile-only package in India to attract customers in a big market with price-sensitive customers.Analysts expect the company to have a blockbuster second half because of a heavy release schedule that includes a new season of “The Crown” and movies by directors Martin Scorsese and Michael Bay. Even after the slowdown last quarter, Netflix still thinks it can have its best year of customer growth in 2019.But competition is coming. Walt Disney Co. and Apple Inc. plan to introduce streaming services this year, while offerings from Comcast Corp. and AT&T Inc. arrive in 2020. Those services may not steal users from Netflix, but they will make future growth harder, according to Michael Pachter, an analyst with Wedbush Securities.Just a Preview?“We saw a preview of next year with this quarter,” Pachter said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. “Next year, they’ll have a couple quarters where they’ll lose subscribers.”Another challenge: Competitors are taking back rights to programs that have been popular on Netflix, including “Friends” and “The Office,” to use for their own services. That will force Netflix to rely even more on its original productions.Those efforts have largely been successful. Its shows just earned 117 nominations for the 2019 Emmy awards. But reruns of old shows still constitute the majority of viewing.The slowdown in users overshadowed the company’s quarterly financial results. Earnings for the second quarter fell to 60 cents a share, but beat analysts’ estimates of 56 cents. Sales grew 26% to $4.92 billion, compared with projections of $4.93 billion.The stock had been up 35% for the year at the close of regular trading, nearly double the gain of the S&P 500. The decline spread to related stocks such as Roku Inc., which makes set-top boxes that deliver the streaming service. Its shares fell as much as 2.5%, but closed little changed.(Updates with closing prices)To contact the reporter on this story: Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple Stock Upgraded on 5G Hopes: What You Need to Know
    Motley Fool21 hours ago

    Apple Stock Upgraded on 5G Hopes: What You Need to Know

    Should you take a bite of Apple in 2019? In 2020? (And on what day of the week?) Or is Wall Street making this decision a lot more complicated than it needs to be?

  • US-China Trade Talk Update: Things Are Still ‘Complicated’
    Market Realist21 hours ago

    US-China Trade Talk Update: Things Are Still ‘Complicated’

    The US-China trade deal is reportedly 90% complete. However, it’s the remaining 10% that’s turning out to be difficult.

  • Fund Managers Increased Risk but Still Fear Slowdown
    Market Realist21 hours ago

    Fund Managers Increased Risk but Still Fear Slowdown

    Despite the markets hitting record highs, not many fund managers are in an optimistic mood.

  • Investing.com23 hours ago

    Stocks - Dow Pares Losses as Traders Bet on Fed Rescue

    Investing.com – Stocks ended the day flat Thursday, after paring the bulk of losses as growing expectations for aggressive Federal Reserve easing lifted sentiment following mixed corporate earnings.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet, Apple and Tesla
    Zacksyesterday

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet, Apple and Tesla

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet, Apple and Tesla

  • Stocks - Morgan Stanley, Netflix Fall Premarket; Union Pacific Bounces
    Investing.comyesterday

    Stocks - Morgan Stanley, Netflix Fall Premarket; Union Pacific Bounces

    Investing.com - Stocks in focus in premarket trading on Thursday:

  • Stocks - U.S. Futures  Fall After Netflix Subscriber Miss
    Investing.comyesterday

    Stocks - U.S. Futures  Fall After Netflix Subscriber Miss

    Investing.com - U.S. futures fell on Thursday, under the dual impact of a disappointing quarterly update from Netflix and revived concerns about U.S.-China trade.

  • Qualcomm Fined $272 Million by EU for Predatory Pricing
    Bloombergyesterday

    Qualcomm Fined $272 Million by EU for Predatory Pricing

    (Bloomberg) -- Qualcomm Inc. was fined 242 million euros ($272 million) by European Union antitrust regulators for deliberately pricing some chips so low they could eliminate a smaller rival.The penalty comes a year after Qualcomm was ordered to pay 997 million euros for thwarting rival suppliers to Apple Inc. The EU said Thursday’s fine was 1.27% of Qualcomm’s revenue last year and "aimed at deterring market players" from trying the same thing.The Qualcomm investigation targeted 3G chips for internet mobile dongles sold between 2009 and 2011. Regulators said these were sold below cost to Huawei Technologies Co. and ZTE Corp., "two strategically important customers," in order to push Icera, now owned by Nvidia Corp., out of the market."Icera was becoming a viable supplier of UMTS chipsets providing high data rate performance, thus posing a growing threat to Qualcomm’s chipset business," the EU said.Companies have complained about the slow pace of EU antitrust enforcement in fast-moving technology markets. Icera sought to draw in the EU by filing a complaint in 2010. It was sold to Nvidia a year later in 2011. The EU opened an investigation four years after that.Qualcomm said in a statement it will appeal and “expose the meritless nature of this decision.” It said it plans to provide a financial guarantee instead of paying the fine, until the courts have ruled.“The commission’s decision is based on a novel theory of alleged below-cost pricing over a very short time period and for a very small volume of chips,” Qualcomm’s general counsel Don Rosenberg said in the statement. “Contrary to the commission’s findings, Qualcomm’s alleged conduct did not cause anti-competitive harm to Icera.”Nvidia didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.Apple ChipsLast year Qualcomm was handed the EU’s fifth-largest antitrust penalty over payments to Apple that the EU said were an illegal ploy to ensure only its chips were used in iPhones and iPads. San Diego-based Qualcomm is challenging the fine at the EU courts.Qualcomm, the largest maker of chips for mobile phones, is unique among semiconductor makers in that it gets most of its profit from licensing patents. Makers of handsets pay the company royalties, whether or not they use its chips. That lucrative profit pool has come under attack as governments around the world scrutinized Qualcomm’s business practices.(Updates with Qualcomm response in sixth, seventh paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Stephanie Bodoni.To contact the reporter on this story: Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Christopher ElserFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple Chip Supplier’s Solid Performance Shows Resilience in Trade Fight
    Bloombergyesterday

    Apple Chip Supplier’s Solid Performance Shows Resilience in Trade Fight

    (Bloomberg) -- Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. projected current-quarter revenue ahead of estimates, as the Apple Inc. supplier shrugs off a smartphone slump and U.S. sanctions on Huawei Technologies Co. to ride demand for cutting-edge chips.The world’s largest contract chipmaker expects sales of $9.1 billion to $9.2 billion in the September quarter, ahead of average projections for about $8.9 billion. The Taiwanese company earlier reported a fall in June-quarter net income to NT$66.8 billion ($2.1 billion), surpassing the NT$65.7 billion estimated.TSMC’s solid outlook may allay fears of a persistent global chip downturn as Washington and Beijing clash. Its technological edge in chipmaking may help it grab an outsized portion of demand for advanced high-performance semiconductors, particularly as countries roll out ultra-fast fifth generation wireless networks. TSMC’s business has bottomed and should begin to rebound, Chief Executive Officer C. C. Wei said.“We have passed the bottom of the cycle of our business, and should see our demand increase,” he told reporters in Taipei Thursday. “We see very, very strong demand” in the second half of 2019.Click here to read a liveblog of TSMC’s post-announcement briefingOrders for crypto-mining gear are expected to help TSMC’s third-quarter sales, according to Morgan Stanley, which recently lifted its target price on the stock by 9%. The typical year-end ramp up of iPhone manufacturing and a new chip-product cycle from Advanced Micro Devices Inc. could also buoy the top line.“The guidance shows that management is confident on the recovery of demand in 2H, possibly boosted by new orders from AMD,” Bloomberg Intelligence Charles Shum said. “And, we expect the gross margin can return to 50%” by the fourth quarter.TSMC and its industry peers are grappling with a plateauing smartphone market, efforts by top customer Apple to move beyond hardware, and U.S. tech-export curbs that have hammered No. 2 customer Huawei. It previously reported a 4.5% slide in first-half revenue -- its worst January-to-June performance since 2011.While top executives expressed confidence that things are turning around, they warned of uncertainty springing from global trade tensions. Japan’s curbs on the export to South Korea of certain vital chipmaking materials could hammer industry players like Samsung Electronics Co., and further depress global smartphone demand.“The recent Japan-Korea dispute is probably the most uncertain” factor for TSMC’s fourth quarter, Chairman Mark Liu said.As the world’s largest player in the business of made-to-order chips, TSMC is a barometer for the broader industry as well as Apple, which accounts for about a fifth of its revenue. While uncertainty remains, its better-than-projected outlook underscores expectations the industry is bottoming out after a dismal few years, when consumers took longer to replace their smartphones and Bitcoin prices collapsed.The company on Thursday signaled its intention to invest for the future, saying its spending on capacity and upgrades could exceed $11 billion this year.TSMC’s shares stood largely unchanged before the announcement and have gained more than 12% this year.(Updates with commentary around Japan and Korea from the 7th paragraph.)\--With assistance from Cindy Wang, Gao Yuan, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee and Adela Lin.To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • TSMC Counts on New iPhones for Revival After Trade War Hit
    Bloombergyesterday

    TSMC Counts on New iPhones for Revival After Trade War Hit

    (Bloomberg) -- All eyes will be on Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.’s outlook after the world’s largest contract chip manufacturer suffered its worst sales drop in nearly eight years.Analysts expect the company’s third-quarter estimates -- due today after the close of trading -- to point to a revival after it took a hit from slowing demand amid U.S.-China trade tensions. At stake is the stock’s $35 billion rebound in market value since a January low.Apple Inc.’s ramp up of iPhone manufacturing and a new product cycle from Advanced Micro Devices Inc. are seen by Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts to lift sales, which would also be boosted if President Donald Trump loosens trade restrictions on key customer Huawei Technologies Co.TSMC’s Sales May Swing Back to Growth on Huawei Orders: ReactAnalysts have forecast sales in the period to grow 15% from a quarter earlier, according to the average of 22 estimates compiled by Bloomberg. The company’s shares are up 12% this year, despite being whipsawed as the trade war escalated. They edged 0.6% higher Thursday morning.“The company’s second-half outlook looks to be improving, and third-quarter guidance will probably be strong given that some of the lingering uncertainty has started to fade,” said John Tsai, portfolio manager at Eastspring Investments Ltd. in Singapore. The trade spat between Japan and South Korea may also help TSMC, as Samsung Electronics Co. customers such as Qualcomm Inc. may seek to diversify, he added.TSMC saw sales drop 4.5% year-on-year in the first half, its worst performance since 2011. The company was grappling with the impact of a slowing global smartphone market and efforts by its biggest customer Apple to move beyond hardware. Then the trade war escalated into the U.S. blacklisting Huawei, TSMC’s second-largest customer.Yet its leading position in advanced technology, especially in 5G and artificial intelligence, helped it secure revenue. Chip orders for crypto mining are also expected to help TSMC’s third-quarter sales, according to Morgan Stanley, which recently lifted its target price on the stock by 9%.TSMC investors will also receive a NT$207 billion ($6.7 billion) dividend payout Thursday, according to stock exchange and company statements. The company is aiming for a dividend per share of at least NT$10 to lure value investors, something Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts Robin Cheng and Mike Yang see as possible in 2020. They argue that rising free cash flow justifies a re-rating of the stock.Here are some highlights of 3Q 2019 estimates:Gross margin: 48.3% (19 estimates)Revenue: NT$276.6b (22 estimates)Net income (GAAP): NT$96.04b (20 estimates)Operating profit: NT$103.5b (15 estimates)Timing: release after market July 18(Updates prices.)To contact the reporters on this story: Cindy Wang in Taipei at hwang61@bloomberg.net;Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sofia Horta e Costa at shortaecosta@bloomberg.net, David Watkins, Philip GlamannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Myths to Bust About Breaking Up ‘Big Tech’
    Motley Foolyesterday

    3 Myths to Bust About Breaking Up ‘Big Tech’

    Advocates and opponents of breaking up Facebook, Google and other technology giants are falling prey to some serious misconceptions.

  • Apple-Chipmaker TSMC’s Outlook Shines as Industry Stabilizes
    Bloomberg10 hours ago

    Apple-Chipmaker TSMC’s Outlook Shines as Industry Stabilizes

    Jul.19 -- Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.projected current-quarter revenue ahead of estimates, as the Apple Inc. supplier shrugs off a smartphone slump and U.S. sanctions on Huawei Technologies Co. to ride demand for cutting-edge chips. Bloomberg's Selina Wang has the story.