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Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited (2330.TW)

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  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, Micron Technology, Power Integrations, Cree and Maxim Integrated Products
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, Micron Technology, Power Integrations, Cree and Maxim Integrated Products

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, Micron Technology, Power Integrations, Cree and Maxim Integrated Products

  • Samsung Heir Sent Back to Prison for 30 Months in Bribery Case
    Bloomberg

    Samsung Heir Sent Back to Prison for 30 Months in Bribery Case

    (Bloomberg) -- Samsung Electronics Co. heir Jay Y. Lee was sentenced to 30 months in prison over bribery charges, a dramatic setback for the world’s biggest electronics company as it tries to move beyond a years-long scandal that inflamed outrage over the cozy relationships between government and business.The Seoul High Court first jailed Lee in 2017 after convicting the billionaire for his role in a corruption scandal that toppled former South Korean president Park Geun-hye. The Samsung Group’s de facto leader served a year in prison, but was released in February 2018 after his original five-year term was cut in half and suspended. The Supreme Court overturned that verdict and ordered a retrial in 2019. Monday’s sentencing, the result of that retrial, sends the top decision maker at the country’s most valuable company back to jail at a time of rising competition and global uncertainty.In the dispute, Lee, 52, was accused of offering horses and other payments to a friend of the former president to win support for his formal succession at the corporation. The Supreme Court upheld a 20-year prison term for Park last week, citing wide-ranging charges including bribery related to Samsung. Lee still faces a second prosecution related to succession.“This is shocking news for Samsung, but Samsung should wrap up this legal wrangling and move forward,” said Chae Yi-bai, a former South Korean lawmaker who has worked at a non-profit shareholder activist organization. “Since Lee already spent one year in prison, there will be one and a half years of a leadership vacuum.”Shares of Samsung Electronics fell 3.4% after the sentencing. An attorney for Lee called the decision “regrettable.” Samsung Electronics declined to comment on the outcome.Why Jail Threat Hangs Over Samsung Billionaire Again: QuickTakeAny void in leadership presents risks for the world’s largest producer of memory chips, smartphones and consumer appliances as it deals with the Covid-19 pandemic, tumultuous U.S.-China relations and intensifying competition in mobile devices and semiconductors. While Samsung’s daily business is run by an army of managers, Lee’s absence may stall or complicate larger investments or strategic longer-term moves. The executive has played an active role at the company, frequently joining government-related and public events after he was released from the prison.“A rocky road is ahead for Samsung with Lee in jail,” said Chung Sun-sup, chief executive officer of Seoul-based corporate-analysis firm Chaebul.com.Samsung is in the midst of several multi-billion-dollar bets that will be crucial to the future of its business. It’s pouring $116 billion into its next-generation chip business that includes fabricating silicon for external clients, betting it can close the gap on industry leader Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. It’s also investing heavily in fifth-generation wireless equipment, seeking to capitalize on the prohibitions against using gear from Huawei Technologies Co.Shin Se-don, an emeritus professor of economics at Sookmyung Women’s University, called the prison sentence “too excessive” and warned that there could be a backlash against the government, given the importance of the Samsung Group to the country.“Lee might be able to manage the company from the jail, but there will be some setback,” said Shin. “The jailing of Lee will give an emotional shock to the people. Samsung is a backbone of our economy and people will be upset about the result.”During the last hearing on Dec. 30, Lee read out a lengthy personal apology over the case -- reiterating pledges he first made in May -- stressing his effort to make Samsung great while pledging not to repeat past wrongdoings, and promising not to pass down power to his children. Lee’s ascension to the chairmanship of Samsung after his father’s death in October is likely to be delayed until he goes free.Separately, he faces another case related to the controversial merger between Samsung C&T and Cheil Industries in 2015, which includes allegations ranging from violation of capital markets law to a breach of duty. Lee will have to attend hearings in that case while serving his time in jail.(Updates with ex-lawmaker’s comment in fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trump Halts Huawei Supply in Final China Blow, Reuters Says
    Bloomberg

    Trump Halts Huawei Supply in Final China Blow, Reuters Says

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. government notified several of Huawei Technologies Co.’s suppliers that it’s revoking their licenses to work with the Chinese company and rejecting other applications in the last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, Reuters reported, citing unidentified people familiar with the matter.Current licensed suppliers that have been notified include Intel Corp., Reuters said. In addition, the Commerce Department indicated its intent to deny “a significant number of license requests for exports to Huawei,” according to an email obtained by the news agency. Representatives for Intel and the U.S. Commerce Department didn’t immediately respond to requests by Bloomberg News seeking comment.The latest move against Huawei is probably the Trump administration’s last strike to weaken the Chinese telecommunications giant and puts the spotlight on how the incoming Biden administration will approach the U.S.-China relationship. Asian chip stocks and Huawei suppliers including Samsung Electronics Co., Tokyo Electron Ltd., Advantest Corp. and Lasertec Corp. slid between 1% and 4% in early Monday trading.Intel was among a small group of companies that the U.S. government cleared to do business with Huawei, which it put on its so-called entity list of national security threats in May 2019. Trump administration sanctions have cut Huawei off from business-critical relationships with the likes of Alphabet Inc.’s Google, which provided the Android software on hundreds of millions of Huawei smartphones, and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. for its cutting-edge chips.Huawei has relied on Intel much less, primarily for its servers and consumer laptop products. A representative for the Chinese company didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.Read more: Trump’s China Inc. Onslaught Leaves Key Decisions for BidenTrump has escalated his campaign to curb China’s technological rise as his term draws to a close. Xiaomi Corp., another smartphone and consumer electronics vendor, was among nine firms added to the U.S. Defense Department’s list of companies with alleged ties to the Chinese military, a move that will restrict U.S. investments in its securities. Other companies include state-owned planemaker Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China Ltd., or Comac, which is central to China’s goal of creating a narrow-body plane that can compete with Boeing Co. and Airbus SE.The profile of the companies targeted, including in the latest announcements on Thursday, is staggering. They include China’s three biggest telecom firms, its top chipmaker, its biggest social media and gaming players, its top two smartphone makers, its main deepwater energy explorer, its premier military aerospace contractor, its leading drone manufacturer and its primary commercial planemaker.While the scope of Trump’s unprecedented actions has roiled markets, the full reckoning of their impact largely hinges on President-elect Joe Biden. His incoming administration will have the power to either keep the restrictions in place, remove them or tighten them further.Read more: U.S. Blacklists Xiaomi in Widening Assault on China Tech(Updates with share action from the third paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.