051910.KS - LG Chem, Ltd.

KSE - KSE Delayed Price. Currency in KRW
496,000.00
+4,500.00 (+0.92%)
At close: 3:30PM KST
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Previous Close491,500.00
Open495,000.00
Bid498,000.00 x 0
Ask498,500.00 x 0
Day's Range487,500.00 - 496,500.00
52 Week Range230,000.00 - 520,000.00
Volume317,964
Avg. Volume580,864
Market Cap39.939T
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.79
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateJul. 22, 2020 - Jul. 28, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2,000.00 (0.41%)
Ex-Dividend DateDec. 27, 2019
1y Target Est453,379.00
  • Reuters

    Electric vehicle startup to unveil truck at former GM Ohio auto plant

    Lordstown Motors Corp will show off its planned electric pickup truck at an event on Thursday as the startup seeks to begin producing vehicles at a former General Motors factory in northeast Ohio. Lordstown Motors, which hopes to start delivering the electric pickup to customers by January 2021 and is still working to raise additional capital, will face significant competition from other automakers. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette will attend the event featuring the pre-production vehicle on Thursday in the politically important state of Ohio.

  • Reuters

    Tesla plans battery manufacturing facility under project 'Roadrunner' -document

    Tesla Inc plans to build a battery research and manufacturing facility in Fremont, California, to be operated around the clock, under a project dubbed Roadrunner, documents from the city government showed. Tesla, which said it currently has a "small-scale" battery manufacturing operation in Fremont, applied for city government approval to build an expanded battery operation. It estimated construction of the project, including the installation of all manufacturing equipment, can be completed in around 3 months.

  • Reuters

    Hyundai, LG Chem draw contest to invest in EV and battery startups

    The companies said they aim to select startups with technological capabilities to help the development of future non-polluting cars through the competition, called 'EV and Battery Challenge'. Hyundai Motor Group, which includes Hyundai Motor Co <005380.KS> and sister company Kia Motors <000270.KS>, has earlier said it plans to deploy 44 eco-friendly automobiles by 2025, including 23 electric vehicles.

  • A Million-Mile Battery From China Could Power Your Electric Car
    Bloomberg

    A Million-Mile Battery From China Could Power Your Electric Car

    (Bloomberg) -- The Chinese behemoth that makes electric-car batteries for Tesla Inc. and Volkswagen AG developed a power pack that lasts more than a million miles -- an industry landmark and a potential boon for automakers trying to sway drivers to their EV models.Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. Ltd. is ready to produce a battery that lasts 16 years and 2 million kilometers (1.24 million miles), Chairman Zeng Yuqun said in an interview at company headquarters in Ningde, southeastern China. Warranties on batteries currently used in electric cars cover about 150,000 miles or eight years, according to BloombergNEF.Extending that lifespan is viewed as a key advance because the pack could be reused in a second vehicle. That would lower the expense of owning an electric vehicle, a positive for an industry that’s seeking to recover sales momentum lost to the coronavirus outbreak and the slumping oil prices that made gas guzzlers more competitive.“If someone places an order, we are ready to produce,” said Zeng, 52, without disclosing if contracts for the long-distance product have been signed. It would cost about 10% more than the batteries now inside EVs, said Zeng, whose company is the world’s largest maker of the batteries.Concerns about batteries losing strength and having to be replaced after a few years is one factor holding back consumer adoption of EVs. Tesla last year flagged it expected to bring into production a battery capable of a million miles of operation, and General Motors Co. last month said it is nearing the milestone. That distance is equivalent to circling the planet 50 times.Anticipating a rapid return to growth for the EV industry, CATL is plowing research-and-development dollars into advances in battery technology. While the coronavirus outbreak will drag down sales throughout this year, EV demand will pick up in early 2021, said Zeng, who founded CATL a decade ago.Car buyers holding back during the pandemic is creating pent-up demand that will be unleashed starting next year, led by premium models, he said. CATL’s customers include BMW AG and Toyota Motor Corp.Zeng’s comments strengthen views that electric vehicles are set to weather the economic slowdown caused by the outbreak better than gas guzzlers. Battery-powered cars will swell to 8.1% of all sales next year in China, which accounts for the largest share of global EV sales, and to 5% in Europe, BNEF predicts.“The pandemic may have a lasting effect throughout 2020, but won’t be a major factor next year,” Zeng said. “We have great confidence for the long run.”CATL struck a two-year contract in February to supply batteries to Tesla, a major boon for the Chinese company as the U.S. electric-car leader has thus far mainly worked with Japan’s Panasonic Corp. and South Korea’s LG Chem Ltd. The deal followed months of negotiations, with Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk traveling to Shanghai to meet with Zeng.The CATL batteries are set to go into Model 3 sedans produced at Tesla’s massive new factory near Shanghai, which started deliveries around the beginning of this year. Batteries are the costliest part of an EV, meaning suppliers of those components have a chance to reap a lion’s share of the industry’s profits.Zeng said he often shares insights with Musk, with the two exchanging text messages about developments in technology and business. CATL is strengthening its relationship with Tesla, with matters such as cobalt-free batteries on their agenda, Zeng said.“We’re getting along well and he’s a fun guy,” Zeng said of Musk. “He’s talking about cost all day long, and I’m making sure we have the solutions.”Zeng said Musk also requested his help in obtaining ventilators for coronavirus patients. The U.S. billionaire delivered more than 1,000 of the breathing machines from China to officials in Los Angeles in March.Shares of CATL have advanced about six-fold in Shenzhen since its initial public offering in 2018, giving the company a market value of about $47 billion. Tesla, by far the most valuable EV maker, has a market capitalization of about $160 billion.A “trigger point” for electric cars will occur once they overtake gasoline-powered vehicles around 2030-2035, Zeng said. That view is more ambitious than that of researchers such as BNEF, which expects the shift to take place a few years later.CATL, which is adding a production facility in Germany, is set to make more than 70% of batteries required by BMW, an early customer, Zeng said. CATL also works with Volkswagen’s Audi unit and is cooperating with Porsche, he said.Zeng didn’t rule out building a plant in the U.S., though he said the company has no specific plans for now.“Our team has made achievements in competing with our global rivals in overseas markets,” Zeng said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • LG Chem share price falls nearly 2% after deadly gas leak in India
    Reuters

    LG Chem share price falls nearly 2% after deadly gas leak in India

    The share price of South Korean chemicals and battery maker LG Chem Ltd <051910.KS> dropped almost 2% on Thursday after a gas leak at a factory operated by a unit in India killed at least nine people, and led to hundreds more being treated in hospital. The leak was brought under control after being discovered by a maintenance worker on the night shift at the LG Polymers plant, outside the east coast city of Visakhapatnam, in India's southern Andhra Pradesh state, according to a company spokesman. Police in India said that nine people died, and emergency services rushed more than 300 people, mostly villagers living nearby, to hospitals.

  • GM reveals 'Ultium,' the heart of its EV strategy
    TechCrunch

    GM reveals 'Ultium,' the heart of its EV strategy

    GM revealed Wednesday a new electric architecture that will be the foundation of the automaker's future EV plans and support a wide range of products across its brands, including compact cars, work trucks, large premium SUVs, performance vehicles and a new Bolt EUV crossover that will come to market next summer. This modular architecture, called "Ultium," will be capable of 19 different battery and drive unit configurations, 400-volt and 800-volt packs with storage ranging from 50 kWh to 200 kWh, and front-, rear- and all-wheel drive configurations. GM's focus on making this EV architecture modular underlines the automaker's desire to electrify a wide variety of its business lines, from the Cruise Origin autonomous taxi and compact Chevrolet Bolt EUV to the GMC HUMMER electric truck and SUV and the newly-announced Cadillac Lyriq SUV.

  • RPT-GM to tout its electric vehicles to investors swooning over Tesla
    Reuters

    RPT-GM to tout its electric vehicles to investors swooning over Tesla

    General Motors Co executives on Wednesday will tackle one of their toughest tasks: Persuading investors that a Detroit automaker can catch up with Elon Musk and Tesla Inc as vehicles go electric. GM is by far the larger manufacturer by volume, and generates more cash and profits.

  • GM to tout its electric vehicles to investors swooning over Tesla
    Reuters

    GM to tout its electric vehicles to investors swooning over Tesla

    General Motors Co executives on Wednesday will tackle one of their toughest tasks: Persuading investors that a Detroit automaker can catch up with Elon Musk and Tesla Inc as vehicles go electric. GM is by far the larger manufacturer by volume, and generates more cash and profits.

  • EXPLAINER-Why automakers are on a drive to sell electric cars in Europe
    Reuters

    EXPLAINER-Why automakers are on a drive to sell electric cars in Europe

    Carmakers are under pressure in Europe to sell more electric cars or face huge fines for breaching new emissions rules aimed at tackling global warming. EU lawmakers also agreed in December 2018 a further cut in CO2 emissions from cars of 37.5% by 2030 compared with 2021 levels - raising the bar just as the fines from the previous target are about to kick in. WHY HAVEN'T ELECTRIC CARS GAINED TRACTION SO FAR?

  • Europe Pushes on With Gigafactory Plan to Rival Tesla
    Bloomberg

    Europe Pushes on With Gigafactory Plan to Rival Tesla

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Germany and France set out a blueprint for a giant battery factory, advancing Europe’s 5 billion euro ($5.5 billion) bid to rival the capacity of Tesla Inc. China to supply the key part for electric vehicles.The announcement at Germany’s Economy and Energy Ministry units underscores determination by European Union nations to catch up with Asian competitors that dominate battery making. Battery cells and add-on electronic devices and software make up as much as half the value of EVs.The facility at Groupe PSA-Opel’s site in Kaiserslautern involves Total SA’s Saft Groupe in a plant that will be named the Automotive Cell Co. The plant will cost about 2 billion euros and will complement a French factory in the Hauts de France region.Germany and France “want to build the best and most sustainable batteries” in Europe, Economy and Energy Minister Peter Altmaier said in a statement from Berlin on Friday. “I’m convinced that battery cells made in Kaiserslautern will set new standards in their CO2 footprint.”Together, the factories will cost about 5 billion euros add production capacity to 48 gigawatt-hours of batteries.Backed by the European Commission, France and Germany dangled subsidies to win over sketics within the auto industry about investing in the technology. While German companies such as Volkswagen AG and BMW AG dominate car manufacturing in Europe, they’ve allowed Asian companies and Tesla to take the lead on making batteries.Contemporary Amperex Technology Co., or CATL, and BYD Co. Ltd. of China are among the leaders in making lithium-ion battery cells, while Tesla has invested in a string of “gigafactories” to supply its luxury electric cars.The European governments also aim to incorporate tighter emission standards in production and recycling stipulations, which may create hurdles for Asian products. European battery cells “won’t be comparable with cheap Chinese products,” Altmaier said last year.The Kaiserslautern factory will be up and running by 2024 and employ 2000 people, Opel’s management board head Michael Lohscheller said. The German and French cell production sites may serve 10% to 15% of demand in Europe, said Altmaier. Germany alone is targeting 7 million to 10 million electric cars on its roads by 2030.Some 13.8 million jobs representing 6.1% of the workforce may be linked to auto manufacturing in the EU. The market for battery cells may be worth as much as 250 billion euros by mid-decade, the EU Commission said.Still, the competition from Asia is likely to be tough.CATL has gained a foothold in Germany in a factory in Thueringia state with a plant with 16 gigawatt-hours of capacity. In 2018, the Chinese company said it aims to be close to the market for for production sites of BMW AG, Volkswagen AG and Daimler AG.LG Chem Ltd is building a battery cell gigafactory in Poland, close to Eastern German car production sites. Tesla Inc. said in November that it will open an electric car production site on the outskirts of Berlin, and Northvolt AB is building a plant in Sweden.(Fixes reference in third paragraph to show factory is at a site, not near headquarters.)To contact the reporter on this story: Brian Parkin in Berlin at bparkin@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net, Lars PaulssonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla partners with LG Chem, CATL for battery supply
    Reuters

    Tesla partners with LG Chem, CATL for battery supply

    Tesla, which has a long-standing battery supply agreement with Japan's Panasonic Corp <6752.T>, said its pact with LG Chem and CATL was at a smaller scale. LG Chem declined to comment, while CATL did not respond to Reuters' requests for comment.

  • Daimler to build 50,000 Mercedes EQC models this year
    Reuters

    Daimler to build 50,000 Mercedes EQC models this year

    Daimler <DAIGn.DE> on Thursday said it plans to build 50,000 Mercedes EQC electric cars this year, denying a report in Manager Magazin which claimed it had been forced to pare back its 2020 production targets due to battery supply problems. Manager Magazin said Mercedes had slashed its production target to 30,000 from about 60,000 because of a shortage of battery cells from LG Chem <051910.KS>.

  • UPDATE 8-GM, LG Chem to build $2.3 bln electric vehicle battery plant in Ohio
    Reuters

    UPDATE 8-GM, LG Chem to build $2.3 bln electric vehicle battery plant in Ohio

    General Motors Co and South Korea's LG Chem said on Thursday they will invest $2.3 billion to build an electric vehicle battery cell joint venture plant in Ohio, creating one of the world's largest battery facilities. The plant, to be built near GM's closed assembly plant in Lordstown in northeast Ohio, will employ more than 1,100 people, the companies said.

  • GM, South Korea's LG hook up in EV battery joint venture
    Reuters Videos

    GM, South Korea's LG hook up in EV battery joint venture

    General Motors is teaming up with South Korea's LG Chem to build an electric vehicle battery factory in Ohio - which would be one of the biggest battery building facilities in the world. Plans for the joint venture were announced Thursday. The two companies will pile in more than $2 billion combined to set up the unit, which will be built near the site of a shuttered GM plant in Lordstown, Ohio. This joint venture is expected to put more than 1100 people to work. Sources familiar with the plan said those employees would likely be part of the United Auto Workers union, which would make this the first unionized battery factory in the United States. GM has come under fire from President Trump for closing factories and shedding jobs. And Democratic presidential candidates joined the picket line with union workers who went on strike demanding better wages and angry about the use of lower-paid contract employees. Like most automakers, GM is looking to bolster sales by investing heavily in electric vehicles and newer self-driving technologies. Construction is set to begin the middle of next year.

  • GM, LG Chem to invest $2.3 billion in EV battery joint venture
    TechCrunch

    GM, LG Chem to invest $2.3 billion in EV battery joint venture

    GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra said Thursday morning that the automaker is forming a joint venture with LG Chem to mass produce battery cells for its electric vehicles, a portfolio that will include a new battery-electric truck coming in the fall of 2021. The two companies said they will invest up to a total of $2.3 billion into the new joint venture and will establish a battery cell assembly plant on a greenfield manufacturing site in the Lordstown area of Northeast Ohio that will create more than 1,100 new jobs. GM has used LG Chem as a lithium-ion and electronics supplier for at least a decade.

  • GM, LG Chem to build $2.3 billion electric vehicle battery plant in Ohio
    Reuters

    GM, LG Chem to build $2.3 billion electric vehicle battery plant in Ohio

    General Motors Co <GM.N> and South Korea's LG Chem <051910.KS> said on Thursday they will invest $2.3 billion (£1.79 billion) to build an electric vehicle battery cell joint venture plant in Ohio, creating one of the world's largest battery facilities. The plant, to be built near GM's closed assembly plant in Lordstown in northeast Ohio, will employ more than 1,100 people, the companies said.

  • Feuding Korean firms risk disrupting electric car battery supplies
    Reuters

    Feuding Korean firms risk disrupting electric car battery supplies

    In 2018, South Korea's SK Innovation beat its larger, local rival LG Chem to a multibillion dollar deal to supply German carmaker Volkswagen with electric vehicle batteries in the United States. With great fanfare, SK Innovation (SKI) broke ground in March on a $1.7 billion (£1.3 billion) factory in Commerce, Georgia, about 200 km from VW's Chattanooga plant, which will be the automaker's electric vehicle hub in the United States. LG Chem (LGC) had other ideas.

  • Coal-reliant Poland's e-car push clouded by EU emissions row
    Reuters

    Coal-reliant Poland's e-car push clouded by EU emissions row

    WARSAW/PRAGUE (Reuters) - Poland is betting on electric batteries to turbocharge its economy, but its dependency on coal could challenge its strategy as the EU seeks to champion European manufacturers that promote clean energy. Eastern Europe's biggest economy is already a centre for auto parts makers such as Michelin <MICP.PA>, Valeo <VLOF.PA> and Denso <6902.T>. As carmakers shift to electric vehicles, spurred by efforts to combat climate change, Warsaw is counting on lithium battery production to carve out a niche in the auto industry's 'green energy' generation manufacturing.

  • Tesla Reaches Preliminary Battery-Supply Deal With CATL
    Bloomberg

    Tesla Reaches Preliminary Battery-Supply Deal With CATL

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc. has reached a preliminary agreement to start using CATL as a battery supplier for cars made in China from as early as next year, and the companies are in talks to expand the relationship globally, according to people familiar with the matter.Following months of negotiations, the companies clinched a non-binding deal after Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk traveled to Shanghai in late August and met with CATL Chairman Zeng Yuqun for about 40 minutes, according to the people, who asked not to be named discussing private deliberations. Though a final agreement is expected to be signed by mid 2020, there is no guarantee that will happen, the people said.The batteries would go into Model 3 cars produced at Tesla’s factory near Shanghai, which is slated to begin operating this year. But the companies still need to iron out details such as how many batteries Tesla will purchase, and separate discussions are underway on a potential global supply contract, the people said. Tesla will use batteries from Panasonic Corp. and LG Chem Ltd. in China in the meantime, one of the people said.Securing enough domestic batteries -- the costliest part of an electric vehicle -- is crucial to Musk’s efforts to expand in the world’s biggest car market. Chinese supply would allow Palo Alto, California-based Tesla to rely less on imports, reducing any impact from tariffs that have fluctuated amid the U.S.-China trade war. It’s also likely to please Beijing, which has prioritized the building of a world-leading electric-vehicle ecosystem.CATL rose as much as 7.4% to 78.88 yuan in Shenzhen trading on Wednesday and the stock headed for its highest close since mid-September. Tesla was little changed Tuesday.Representatives for Tesla didn’t respond to requests for comment. LG Chem and CATL declined to comment, while Panasonic wasn’t immediately available to comment.For CATL, whose full name is Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. Ltd., a final agreement would bolster its profile as one of the world’s emerging battery-making powerhouses. The company, based in the southern province of Fujian, already supplies domestic EV startups including NIO Inc., as well as global carmakers Volkswagen AG and Daimler AG.Tesla has been building the Shanghai plant, its first outside the U.S., for the past nine months, with mass production targeted to start at year-end. The company is also building facilities to eventually make batteries, but in the meantime, it’s agreed to purchase them from LG Chem. The South Korean battery maker won’t have exclusive rights to be Tesla’s battery supplier, people familiar with the arrangement said in August.Should Tesla agree to a global agreement, CATL would become its second such battery partner after Osaka, Japan-based Panasonic.What Bloomberg Intelligence Says“It’s a competitive blow to Panasonic as Tesla was relying on the Japanese battery producer only. But it’s a boon for CATL and LG Chem.”\--Kevin Kim, automobiles analystTesla is likely to try having several strong suppliers, giving it negotiating power as they’ll compete and drive down battery prices, said Kevin Kim, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence in Hong Kong. Having several partners also helps Tesla diversify risks such as faulty batteries resulting in fires.NIO Jumps 37% After Pact With Intel on Driverless Car TechnologyBatteries make up the bulk of an electric vehicle’s cost, meaning long-term supply deals with top carmakers can easily reach billions of dollars. The price of a China-built Tesla Model 3 will start at about $50,000, cheaper than foes including NIO’s best-selling ES6.(Updates with comment from analyst in 10th paragraph)\--With assistance from Kyunghee Park, Kae Inoue, Dana Hull and Gabrielle Coppola.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Haze Fan in Beijing at hfan40@bloomberg.net;Chunying Zhang in Shanghai at czhang714@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, ;Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Ville Heiskanen, Will DaviesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • ‘They Don’t Need Us Anymore’: Auto Workers Fear Electric Unrest
    Bloomberg

    ‘They Don’t Need Us Anymore’: Auto Workers Fear Electric Unrest

    (Bloomberg) -- The milkman went missing thanks to the rise of refrigerators. Switchboard operators were done in by the dawn of direct dialing. And in the car industry, auto workers are deathly afraid the engine assembler will give way to battery builders.Dread over the prospect that plug-in cars -- which have fewer parts and require less labor to build -- will doom auto jobs helped spark the first United Auto Workers strike against General Motors Co. in over a decade. Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV, which are rolling their own battery-powered models to market in the coming years, could face a similar fate if they’re unable to quell the UAW’s concerns that widespread adoption of EVs endangers the employment of 35,000 union members.“There’s a potential for our jobs to be gone -- they don’t need us anymore,” said Tim Walbolt, president of the UAW local representing workers at a Fiat Chrysler transmission components plant near Toledo, Ohio. “It scares us.”For all the buzz generated by Tesla Inc., the EV era is still in its infancy, with zero-emission autos having reached just 2% of global production. GM has extended the UAW an offer to get in on the ground floor, pitching a new battery plant staffed by dues-paying union members in an Ohio town jarred by job loss. But the overture came with a catch: GM wants to pay the workers less, and the facility is unlikely to need as many staff as an engine or transmission factory would.A recent study of electric-vehicle production in Europe by consultant AlixPartners found that it took 40% fewer hours to assemble an electric motor and battery than a traditional internal-combustion engine and transmission.“It’s a bad news story from a labor perspective,” said Mark Wakefield, the head of AlixPartners’s automotive practice. “You would just fundamentally need less people.”Perversely, GM also arguably has uncertainty on its side at the bargaining table. It’s going to want concessions to cushion itself against the risk that consumer adoption of electric autos remains slow. The carmaker isn’t fully utilizing the factory that builds the Chevrolet Bolt EV north of Detroit, and tepid demand for the plug-in hybrid Chevy Volt put the future of the factory that assembles it in nearby Hamtramck in doubt.Collision CourseThe collision with carmakers over electrification is one the UAW saw coming.“Electric, to me, is where the real risk is to our membership,” Jennifer Kelly, the union’s research director, said during a collective-bargaining conference in Detroit earlier this year.It’s almost certain to carry over from the UAW’s talks with GM to negotiations with Detroit’s other automakers. Ford has estimated electric cars will require 30% fewer hours of labor per vehicle and 50% less factory floor space.“Rationalization of the powertrain portfolio is certainly a huge opportunity for all of us as we start this transition,” Joe Hinrichs, Ford’s automotive president, told investors on an earnings call in April.Even Fiat Chrysler, a laggard with regard to electrification, has stoked fear at union halls linked to internal-combustion components plants, where rumors are flying that the company plans to outsource work to lower-paying suppliers.“We cannot help but feel like the left behind stepchildren of the UAW,” Mike Booth, the president of the union’s local in Marysville, Michigan, wrote in a letter to the labor group’s Chrysler council last month. He and other UAW leaders fear that German mega-supplier ZF Friedrichshafen AG, which took over operation of a Chrysler axle plant in 2008, will take work away from the automaker’s machining facility near Toledo and a transmission and castings complex in Kokomo, Indiana.A Fiat Chrysler spokeswoman categorically denied that another company is seeking to take work from the Toledo or Kokomo operations and called them critical to the automaker’s business. ZF will continue to work with the UAW in Marysville, and an arrangement in which Fiat Chrysler licenses technology from the supplier in Kokomo may be creating some confusion, a spokesman said. He declined to comment on Toledo.‘Shrinking Bubble’In August, GM shut down a transmission plant outside Detroit, affecting more than 260 workers as part of a larger restructuring. That may foreshadow other closures as EV production ramps up. The supply chain is where the job risk is greatest, especially for workers employed making engines, transmissions and sub-components that aren’t needed in EVs.Consultant IHS Markit predicts the introduction of new gas-powered engine families will drop to zero in 2022, from nearly 70 in 2011, as automakers shift spending to electric propulsion. The market for a whole range of parts used in internal combustion vehicles -- such as axles, mufflers, fuel tanks and transmissions -- will shrink in a range from 6% to 20% by 2025, according to a study by Deloitte Consulting.“The value chain is shifting and companies and their unions are going to have to figure out how to change themselves or risk becoming part of a shrinking bubble,” said Neal Ganguli, head of the auto supply base group at Deloitte’s U.S. automotive practice.That’s a problem because engines and transmissions currently account for just under half of automaker manufacturing capacity, Credit Suisse auto analyst Dan Levy estimated in a Sept. 23 note to investors. As a result, automakers may face labor, social and political challenges as they transition to EVs, he wrote.‘Rough Time’GM’s EV factory in Lake Orion, Michigan, offers a window into what the UAW is worried about.While the plant is unionized, the automaker staffs it in part with lower-wage employees under a special contract. What’s more, 64% of the fully electric Bolt model’s content is made in Korea, including the battery.One of the biggest suppliers is Seoul-based LG Chem Ltd., which makes cells in South Korea and assembles packs for GM and Fiat Chrysler at a non-union plant in western Michigan with a starting wage for technicians of $16 an hour.That’s close to what Ford pays its entry-level temporary workers, but far below the $28 to $30 an hour for legacy UAW employees. Temp workers at Ford’s engine and transmission plants also can move up into legacy wage brackets, which isn’t the case at LG’s facility.“The move to electric could weaken the union further,” Joshua Murray, a labor expert and assistant professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University. “Certainly, the UAW is going to have to try to organize the battery plants, but I think they’ll have a rough time.”Imported BatteriesNo major automaker entirely outsources engines, in no small part thanks to displacement and horsepower being the source of marketing buzz and bragging rights for decades. EVs are a different story -- even Tesla relies heavily on Japan’s Panasonic Corp. in the making of its battery packs.Batteries -- the single most expensive part of an electric vehicle -- are almost exclusively manufactured overseas and mostly by companies relatively new to the automotive powertrain, such as China’s Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. Ltd. and South Korea’s SK Innovation Co.SK Innovation broke ground earlier this year on a new battery factory outside of Atlanta, which will employ some 2,000 non-union workers. And CEO Jun Kim thinks carmakers will have a tough time replicating what his company does.“There is a difference between the DNA of automakers and battery makers such as us,” Kim said in a March interview. “There are only a handful of battery suppliers that are capable of delivering high-quality products while guaranteeing cost competitiveness.”\--With assistance from David Welch.To contact the reporters on this story: Chester Dawson in Southfield at cdawson54@bloomberg.net;Keith Naughton in Southfield, Michigan at knaughton3@bloomberg.net;Gabrielle Coppola in New York at gcoppola@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    LG Display to replace its chief executive amid mounting losses

    South Korea's LG Display Co Ltd <034220.KS> on Monday said it has named LG Chem <051910.KS> President Jeong Ho-young as its new chief executive officer. LG Display, a supplier to Apple <AAPL.O>, said in a statement that Chief Executive Han Sang-beom offered to step down over mounting losses. LG Display has been struggling with a global supply glut in liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) used in television sets, which has pushed down prices.

  • SK Innovation fuels LG Chem feud with EV battery patent lawsuit
    Reuters

    SK Innovation fuels LG Chem feud with EV battery patent lawsuit

    A feud between two South Korean battery makers escalated on Friday as SK Innovation Co Ltd <096770.KS> said it plans to sue bigger rival LG Chem Ltd <051910.KS> in the United States over alleged patent infringement related to electric vehicles (EV). The proposed new lawsuit by SK Innovation drew a swift denunciation from LG Chem, which called the action "groundless" and said it would seek compensation. The two companies have been at loggerheads since LG Chem sued SK in the United States in April for alleged theft of trade secrets by hiring former LG Chem employees.

  • Tesla to Buy Batteries for Chinese Factory from LG Chem
    Market Realist

    Tesla to Buy Batteries for Chinese Factory from LG Chem

    Today, citing people familiar with the matter, Bloomberg reported that Tesla (TSLA) had agreed to buy batteries from LG Chem (LGCLF).

  • Investing.com

    Stocks: U.S. Futures Rise Ahead of Key Powell Speech

    Investing.com - U.S. futures inched higher on Friday ahead of a speech from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell at the central bank's annual gathering in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.