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'You're being a baby': This 41-year-old man has no job, no savings and relies on his parents for rent — but refuses work that's 'beneath' him. Caleb Hammer delivers a wake-up call

'You're being a baby': This 41-year-old man has no job, no savings and relies on his parents for rent — but refuses work that's 'beneath' him. Caleb Hammer delivers a wake-up call
'You're being a baby': This 41-year-old man has no job, no savings and relies on his parents for rent — but refuses work that's 'beneath' him. Caleb Hammer delivers a wake-up call

Financial struggles usually arise from personal or professional challenges. Sometimes, however, these struggles can simply be rooted in pride.

On an episode of Caleb Hammer’s YouTube show “Financial Audit,” 41-year-old Brent of Austin, Texas, reveals he has no steady job, no savings and relies on his parents to pay rent. All this in the midst of a nationwide labor shortage.

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Part of the problem is he refuses to accept work that’s “beneath” him.

“You’re being a baby,” Hammer told his guest, who had confessed he turned down a job at a fast food restaurant. “Why will you not accept the jobs that you feel are slightly beneath you?”

Brent — who threatened to walk away from the interview if Hammer continued to deride him — says he refuses to engage with the lower end of the job market, highlighting the mental hurdle of being overqualified.

Job market

Brent once owned an advertising agency that he claims generated $500,000 a year in revenue. Everything was sailing smoothly until his apartment burned down. He had no insurance.

“I just completely broke down,” he said.

Brent claims the trauma distracted him from work and he had to let his clients go to other agencies. He has struggled to land a job ever since.

He might not find something that perfectly matches his creative media background, but the fact of the matter is there are more job openings in the U.S. right now than there are unemployed people. The latest Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data shows there are 6.1 million unemployed workers compared to 9 million job openings.

In January, professional and business services added 74,000 jobs, after last year’s average monthly increase of 14,000. The retail trade sector added 45,000 jobs. The leisure and hospitality sector, which Brent seems to be avoiding, added an average of 39,000 jobs a month in 2023, according to the BLS.

Read more: Here's how you can invest in rental properties without the responsibility of being a landlord

Brent might try his luck finding a job at his desired level in a professional or high-level retail setting while making money in service and hospitality, but he refuses to take a “step down” in the meantime.

“Something better is going to come along and I just know it,” he said.

Hammer wasn’t convinced.

“If your option right now is nothing or something, I’d pick something. Even if that something is not absolutely fantastic,” he said.

Financial situation

Brent says he takes on odd jobs for income, but it’s not enough to pay rent, which is covered by his parents. That makes him part of another unfortunate cohort. One in four millennials say they rely on their parents to pay their rent, according to a survey by OnePoll for the Chartway Credit Union.

Brent’s situation isn’t unusual, but he seems to make it worse with bad spending habits. He acquired roughly $3,000 in short-term, high interest loans and frequently purchases online lottery tickets.

The situation is bleak, but not hopeless, at least according to Hammer.

“What I would do in general is I would just go get a job today. I would start driving Uber Eats,” he said. “I would also just go work a billion hours a week, every moment that you’re not sleeping.”

Hammer also recommends cutting back on gambling purchases, such as the lottery tickets, and online subscriptions. This could give Brent some room to pay off his debts quickly and stop relying on his parents for financial assistance.

“No more spending money on fun” until the debt is gone, Hammer suggested.

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This article provides information only and should not be construed as advice. It is provided without warranty of any kind.