Advertisement
Canada markets open in 2 minutes
  • S&P/TSX

    21,587.88
    -51.22 (-0.24%)
     
  • S&P 500

    5,473.23
    +41.63 (+0.77%)
     
  • DOW

    38,778.10
    +188.94 (+0.49%)
     
  • CAD/USD

    0.7281
    -0.0008 (-0.11%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    80.55
    +0.22 (+0.27%)
     
  • Bitcoin CAD

    89,160.70
    -1,018.03 (-1.13%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,347.61
    -41.79 (-3.01%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    2,331.40
    +2.40 (+0.10%)
     
  • RUSSELL 2000

    2,022.01
    +15.85 (+0.79%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    4.2440
    -0.0350 (-0.82%)
     
  • NASDAQ futures

    19,928.50
    +7.25 (+0.04%)
     
  • VOLATILITY

    12.66
    -0.09 (-0.71%)
     
  • FTSE

    8,181.10
    +38.95 (+0.48%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    38,482.11
    +379.67 (+1.00%)
     
  • CAD/EUR

    0.6782
    -0.0005 (-0.07%)
     

We're now spending three years of our lives on social media

We're a nation of social media addicts (Picture: Getty)
We’re a nation of social media addicts (Picture: Getty)

We’re living in an age where our smartphones have basically become another part of our bodies that we’re seemingly unwilling unable to live without.

But a new study has now shown the true extent of our obsession with technology, revealing that we spend more than three years of our lives updating social media.

With selfies to take and loyal followers to update (or so we think), it’s perhaps not that surprising – and it certainly wasn’t the only surprise statistic generated by the Samsung study of 3000 people.

We also spend more than a year of our lives in the pub – with people in England spending 368 days of their life in a chosen waterhole, closely followed by the 299 days spent by the people of Northern Ireland.

Cheers! (Picture: Getty)
Cheers! (Picture: Getty)

It also seems that the old stereotype of Britain being particularly fond of queuing rings true.

ADVERTISEMENT

The study found that we spend over 235 days of our life queuing, although we’re far too polite to ever mention about the delays being presented in front of us.

Dr Becky Spellman, who led the research, said that the report proved that people were busier now than at any point in history.

‘The ‘always-on generation’ of under 40’s are working longer hours, have their diaries packed with social activities and are glued to multiple screen devices to stay constantly connected to the world via social media’, she said.

MORE: Scientists have identified a gene which supresses your desire to drink alcohol

MORE: A plague pit with skeletons of Black Death victims has been found in Lincolnshire

‘Interestingly as we become a generation of people who find it hard to switch off, our brains are adjusting and making us even better multi-taskers. Our ability to juggle, manage and process information is growing at a substantial rate.’

And with that, we’re off to send a tweet while necking a pint. Cheers!