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UIL will vote on high school shot clock proposal during Legislative Council meeting

·2 min read

The UIL Legislative Council will meet in Austin on Tuesday to review and vote on rules and proposed rule changes, one of which is a shot clock at Texas high school basketball games.

The full meeting can be viewed live on the UIL Legislative Council Webpage. The athletic portion of the meeting will start at around 9:45 a.m.

A proposal will be to add a shot clock, but only for Class 6A and 5A, the two largest classifications.

In May, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) announced that a 35-second shot clock will be permitted in high school basketball games by state associations beginning in the 2022-23 season.

Only nine states currently use a shot clock at high school basketball games: California, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington.

While Texas isn’t one of them, the UIL follows NFHS guidelines when it comes to high school sports.

The UIL recently conducted a three-year trial that allowed schools to experiment using a shot clock for tournaments, but the UIL said that “the shot clock was not substantial enough to justify pursuing the matter further.”

“The UIL is constantly adapting to changes in the playing rules for each of our sports and we are interested in changes which keep a balance between offense and defense in team sports,” said UIL executive director Dr. Charles Breithaupt in May. “UIL staff has studied the issue of the shot clock in basketball for several years and we do not consider these changes for entertainment purposes. Rather, we study what is best for boys and girls basketball in Conferences 1A-6A.”

Other proposals on Tuesday will be whether to add a two-week period before the regular baseball season for pitchers and catchers to work on fundamentals, a proposal to allow schools flexibility in the strength and conditioning period, a proposal to change the weight of relay points awarded in track, and a proposal to allow Armilla technology to be used on the sidelines for football

Return to dfwVarsity on Tuesday to see the results.

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