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South Carolina principal resigns over racially insensitive social media posts

·1 min read

The principal of Greenville’s elite engineering elementary school has resigned after someone told the Greenville County School District about “racially insensitive” posts he made on social media in 2012 and 2013.

A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School, named for a father who sued the district over unequal facilities for Black students, was the first school to be built in a Black neighborhood in decades when it opened in 2010.

Preston Spratt, the principal, was placed on administrative leave on Sept. 23, and the district announced his resignation Tuesday.

The district released a statement from Spratt that said, “My work in education is focused on improving student outcomes, creating community partnerships, and my never-ending belief that all students will succeed when we provide them with excellent teachers. I deeply regret authoring the tweets and appreciate the opportunities I have had at A.J. Whittenberg. I look forward to continuing my mission in a new setting.”

Spratt, who is white, was in his first year as principal of A.J. Whittenberg school. He previously worked in Sumter schools and has lived in Charlotte.

Whittenberg’s daughter Elaine was the first to integrate Greenville County schools in 1964 after he sued the school district the year before. Greenville County schools were not fully integrated until 1970 under order by the federal courts.

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