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Mono contribution to Credit Valley Conservation now $13,000

·2 min read

Editor's Note: This story was first published on Jan. 15. This version corrects the title of Jeff Payne, and clarifies Mono's contribution in the headline. As Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) presented its annual budget to Mono council recently, officials outlined major expenditures while stressing the authority is doing what it can to raise revenue beyond local taxpayers.

For example, about $2.7 million has been invested in the Island Lake Conservation Area’s dam since 2012.

CVC continues to operate and maintain the dam averaging about $338,000 per year, a delegation told council Jan. 12.

“We have been continuing to upgrade the dam and bring it up to safety standards,” said Deborah Martin-Downs, chief administrative officer. “That has cost us a lot of money over the years, but it is almost finished.”

She also discussed variances in the new 2021 budget. The township will allocate about $13,000 to the authority’s general and special levy, signifying a 4.8 per cent increase.

Their operating budget consists of $9.9 million from municipal funding, $5.6 million from internal chargebacks, $2.7 million from user fees and funding from the province. They also generate $4.9 million on their own in an average year but don’t anticipate the same contribution with the ongoing pandemic.

“We don’t just rely on municipal funding,” said Downs. “We generate many of our own fees through our conservation areas and our planning fees. We have alternate sources of funding, through grants and other contributions and areas.”

Downs also announced they have completed their latest strategic plan, delaying its implementation as government changes are proposed to conservation authorities in the province.

CVC director, corporate services and deputy CAO Jeff Payne, meanwhile, said uncertainty over municipal funding makes it hard to plan for the coming year.

“The situation where one municipality might be in and another municipality might be out, is going to make it very difficult as we try to ascertain how to fund staff resources,” he said.

“If funding were to be reduced, we rely on that total bucket of funding to sustain and complement the staff we have. If that starts to decline, then we’re going to be in situations where we may have to make some adjustments to staffing.”

Joshua Santos, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, Orangeville Banner