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Lexington County freezes new subdivision applications for six months. Here’s why

Bristow Marchant
·1 min read

Lexington County is freezing new subdivision developments for the next six months, while the county reviews its standards for new development.

The freeze passed its first reading by Lexington County Council on Tuesday, but by invoking a “pending ordinance” rule, council members ensured county staff will not accept any new applications for certain developments.

The freeze will affect any application to develop 10 or more lots for new housing, subdivisions with lots of less than half an acre, or developments with some “attached land use activities.”

No new submissions will be considered for 180 days. During that time, the county council will review its comprehensive plan for the unincorporated parts of the county and how it can better plan for future development in one of the state’s fastest-growing counties.

County Development Manager Rebecca Conway told the council that applications that have already been fully submitted — including “all required applications, surveys, fees, and documentation” — will continue to move through the system.

County staff could still have “development review” meetings with developers on proposals for other projects, “with the understanding that some things may change in the interim,” Conway said.

But even as council approved the motion on Tuesday, members said they wanted to minimize disruptions as much as possible. “The ripple effect of how this affects our economy concerns me,” said Councilwoman Debbie Summers, qualifying her “yes” vote on the initial reading.

While the council has the option to extend the moratorium beyond 180 days, Council Chairman Todd Cullum said he would “Not commit to a day after that, unless some circumstance would call on us to go beyond that.”