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Your last chance to spot a lunar eclipse in 2020 is this weekend. Here’s what to know

Maddie Capron
·1 min read

Your last chance to see a lunar eclipse this year is coming up, but it’s going to be hard to see.

The final lunar eclipse of the year will happen overnight Sunday, AccuWeather reported.

Lunar eclipses occur when Earth’s shadow blocks the sun’s light, which otherwise reflects off the moon,” Space.com reported. “There are three types — total, partial and penumbral — with the most dramatic being a total lunar eclipse, in which Earth’s shadow completely covers the moon.”

Sunday’s event will be a partial penumbral eclipse of the full moon, according to EarthSky. That means the moon will move through the “faint outer part of Earth’s shadow,” and will decrease the moon’s brightness, according to The Weather Channel.

The change won’t be dramatic, but it will be visible in North and South America — depending on the weather, according to Space.com

The best time to witness the eclipse is at about 4:43 a.m. on the East Coast, according to AccuWeather.

“It’ll be the faintest of eclipses — nearly imperceptible — so that some of you will swear nothing is happening even while staring straight at it,” EarthSky reported. “Then again … observant people may notice a subtle shading on the moon, even without knowing an eclipse is taking place.”