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Heat wave warning issued for parts of N.W.T.

·1 min read
A heat warning has been issued by Environment Canada for several parts of the Northwest Territories. The extreme weather is expected to start Thursday and last until about the middle of next week for most communities. (Environment Canada - image credit)
A heat warning has been issued by Environment Canada for several parts of the Northwest Territories. The extreme weather is expected to start Thursday and last until about the middle of next week for most communities. (Environment Canada - image credit)

Environment Canada has issued a heat warning for parts of Northwest Territories.

People living in the following communities can expect temperatures to reach or exceed 29 C within the next day:

  • Fort Providence Region (including Kakisa).

  • Fort Simpson Region (including Jean Marie River).

  • Inuvik Region.

  • South Delta Region (including Fort McPherson and Tsiigehtchic).

  • Thebacha Region (including Fort Smith).

  • Wrigley Region.

The high temperatures are expected to start on Thursday and last until the middle of next week for most communities, the notice says. The overnight lows could be between 17 to 20 C.

Extreme heat exposure can lead to heat-related illnesses such as heat-stroke.

Symptoms might include dizziness, fainting, nausea or vomiting, headaches, rapid breathing, extreme thirst and decreased urination.

Children, pregnant women and elderly people are at higher risk of adverse health impacts from heat, along with people with chronic illnesses or who are on certain medications, and those who spend large amounts of time outdoors.

Wearing loose-fitting, light-weight clothing, staying hydrated, closing curtains and windows during the hottest hours, using air conditioners or fans and scheduling outdoor activities for cooler parts of the day may help reduce the risk.

Residents should also remember not to leave children, impaired adults or pets inside a parked vehicle during high temperatures.

People feeling dizzy or disoriented due to the extreme heat are advised to seek medical attention.

For more information on heat waves and health visit Environment Canada's website.

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