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Here's how much prize money France or Croatia will win in the World Cup Final

Abigail Hess

On Sunday, France and Croatia will compete for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, and the stakes are high. National pride, fame and some serious cash is on the table. Here’s how much they stand to win.

In 2017, the FIFA Council announced that the organization’s total contributions to fund the 2018 World Cup would be a whopping $791 million — a 40 percent increase from the previous tournament in 2014. Of this total, $400 million will be used exclusively as prize money for participating teams — a 12 percent increase.

This increase in funding means that France and Croatia can win more prize money than ever before in World Cup history.

The winning team will win $38 million, and runners-up will win $28 million. For a smaller team like Croatia, those funds could go a long way.

According to Time, the prize money is given to each country's national FIFA federation. These organizations determine how the winnings will be distributed and how much each individual player will receive.

The World Cup trophy is estimated to be worth $20 million. While the winners don't get to keep the trophy indefinitely, the fame and publicity associated with winning the World Cup can lead to corporate sponsorships, advertising deals and hefty contracts .

Of course, France and Croatia are not the only teams who will be taking cash home from the World Cup. All teams that advanced to the group stage receive a minimum of $8 million in prize money, as well as $1.5 million to “cover preparation costs.”



Here’s how the prize money breaks down:

17th-32nd place: $8 million

Ninth-16th place: $12 million

Fifth-Eighth place: $16 million

Fourth place: $22 million

Third place: $24 million

Second place: $28 million

First place: $38 million

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