7 ways to get kicked off a plane



Your plane ticket is your pass to far-flung destinations—on several conditions. Check your airline's contract of carriage; there, buried in pages of text, you'll find a list of violations that'll get you banned from boarding or even kicked off a plane.







Contracts of carriage vary slightly by airline, but most contracts have some kind of language prohibiting passengers from doing anything that endangers the safety or comfort of fellow flyers. This is all subject to interpretation by airline employees, which is why we often see so many wild stories of passengers getting the boot. So what, specifically, shouldn't you do? The following seven behaviors should be avoided at all costs.

Refuse To Buckle Your Seat Belt

If for any reason a passenger can't or isn't willing to buckle his seat belt, flight crew will probably show him the door. It happened to a 3-year-old boy who wouldn't buckle up on an Alaska Airlines flight. It also happens when passengers are too large to fasten their seat belts. Travelers are required by federal law to wear a seat belt on some phases of all flights. And until recently, passengers of size could bring a seat belt extender on board to help with fit. But in August, the Federal Aviation Administration declared that flyers must be able to buckle up using the aircraft's original seat belt or with an extender offered by the airline, if available.

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